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"Ik heb honger."

Translation:I am hungry.

4 years ago

15 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/themdenkmemes
themdenkmemes
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Hi hungry, I'm dad!

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/dpjoseph

To say "We are thirsty" in Dutch, it is "Wij hebben dorst" (correct me if I'm wrong)

"Ik"=I "heb"=have "honger"=hunger

Duolingo is sometimes a bit weird when it comes to comfort in translations but it seems now to impose comfort. Literally the sentence means to me "I have hunger" and I was marked wrong. Is there something I'm missing?

"I have hunger" is perfectly acceptable in English, although a bit unusual for everyday conversation. It's not like saying "Me are hungry".

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MorbidEntree

I think they mark that as incorrect so it will teach us that it is supposed to mean "I am hungry" so we don't get into bad habits or something.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/alfredo-martin
alfredo-martin
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In Spanish, my tongue, is the same way, I'm hungry = "tengo hambre" (I have hunger); I'm thirsty = tengo sed (I have thirst). Although saying those literally: "Estoy hambriento" and "Estoy sediento" also works, but it's less common.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/shell_cocoon

Why the 'G' in honger sounds like 'G' in the word "Good" in english instead the sounds of 'G' in the word "Dag" in dutch?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/LeviPolasak

Sorry if this is late, but in Dutch, g alone makes the hebrew khet sound, but with an n it always makes an ng sound like in English, (see, the word Engels, they say engel, not enkhel)

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/shell_cocoon

Thank you

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/martin43417

Could Ik ben honger translate to I am hungry, too?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/robagio
robagio
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No, in many other languages in Europe, "I am hungry" translates to "I have hunger". But you just have to know that's what is meant.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/katiem415

Many languages say "I have hunger" but in English it would translate to I'm hungry

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/kobajagiprinceza

Why isn't it "het honger" or "de honger" like in "Ik heb het warm."? Or even why is it "het warm" and not "Ik heb warm."? I know honger is a "de noun" but warm is not a noun at all and yet it got the "het". I am really confused.

EDIT:

Wait! I think I got it! If the thing we are feeling is an adjective - we put het in front of it (but het meaning it not het meaning the). If it is a noun, no article is needed. So, Ik heb het warm. literally means I have it hot bringing us to it's I am warm meaning. Is this correct?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Aleasha21

This literally means I have hunger so I disagree that I got it marked wrong..

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/sternnacht

actually my dutch teacher (he lives near Venlo) said that 'honger' too negative is and that 'ik heb trek' correct is.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Gymnastical
Gymnastical
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Might be some weird regional thing. Another Dutch person from Brabant told me something different. He says that trek talks about a food craving, which means you're not actually hungry but do want whatever it is you have the craving for. Honger on the other hand talks about actual hunger. Ask him about whether there's some weird regional thing about that. Individual opinions vary too.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jack484289

Im hungry

4 months ago