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"De jongen eet een citroen en een limoen."

Translation:The boy is eating a lemon and a lime.

July 19, 2014

9 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JohanndeBoer

In English, the second "a / een" could be left out and the sentence would have the same meaning. Is that also the case in Dutch?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/CHUSA1999

No, saying "a lemon and lime" does have a slightly different meaning. It either implies that the lemon and lime are one (like in a soda) or that the lime is something that using "a" with would be grammatically awkward, such as when it is used to mean limestone. "A lemon and a lime" establishes that the two are different entities.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/joarhagland

How is "hij eet" compared to "hij eten"? When should the latter be used (if ever)?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/EthanGraha2

eet is for the singular, eten is plural:

ik eet / wij eten jij eet / jullie eten hij/zij/het eet / zij eten

think of it like eet is eats and eten is eat. i, you, he/she/it eats. we, you (all), they eat.

therefore, hij eten is saying (singular) he (plural) eat and is grammatically incorrect. should be hij eet.

hope this helps :)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/joarhagland

How is "hij eet" compared to "hij eten"? When should the latter be used (if ever)?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/marcuslangford

"Hij eten" should never be used because "eten" means food as well as eat, so: "he food" or "he eat"

Whereas "hij eet" only means "he eats/eat"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/IkyTony

How can you say " boys eatS a lime and..." Makes no sense...


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/marcuslangford

De jongens eten een citroen en een limoen


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jytou

Got burnt by the singular "jongen" as well... it's not "boys", it's "boy" :)

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