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"Onze namen zijn niet Willem en Saskia."

Translation:Our names are not William and Saskia.

4 years ago

26 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/slackbeard
slackbeard
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that sneaky niet in there

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Nalex-01

Is it usually that sneaky ?

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JohnWelch2

PLOT TWIST

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/LICA98
LICA98
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Saskia is a common name?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Saskiyeaaaaah

My name is Saskia :)

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/vam1980
vam1980
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Yeah, it's a common name, although it looks like it's had it's most popular days in the past (http://www.meertens.knaw.nl/nvb/naam/is/saskia). If you look on the 'Verspreiding' (=distribution) tab, you can see that it's mostly common in big cities.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/lukman.A
lukman.A
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Yes it's a common name, at least, in Indonesia.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/vertices

What's the difference between using 'niet' or 'geen' to indicate a negative?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SnekpitTom
SnekpitTom
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If you know German or are doing the German course also, "geen" is the equivalent of "kein", meaning you have no amount of something, e.g. "ik heb geen water", "I have no water/I do not have water" , whereas "niet" is the equivalent of "nicht", meaning a negation of the previous statement, e.g. "ik heb de water niet", "I do not have the water". As far as I can tell, "geen" is only used when speaking of an indefinite quantity, and as soon as you change to definite form, you use "niet" to negate, but I'm only a beginning Dutch learner, so maybe a more experienced speaker can clarify on this matter? Dag! :)

6 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/israellai
israellai
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Dutch possessives, how I love you. No endings at all, just like English, just like home.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Remi1771

I think "Our names are neither Willem nor Saskia" should be accepted, anyone knows why not?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/vam1980
vam1980
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"Neither....nor...." is translated in Dutch as "noch....noch....". This construction is not applicable in this sentence.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ajpthree
ajpthree
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so I'm assuming "Saskia" has no english equivalent? (no hint under the name)

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Lavinae
Lavinae
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Even though Sasha may come close, it's not a real equivalent.

Wiki quote:

The name is often said to be of Dutch origin, which originally meant "a Saxon woman" (alteration of "Saxia").

From what I can tell by other descriptions of the etymology, this is the commonly held origin of the name. The term or name 'Saxon' is then itself derived from 'Sahsa', which means 'knife' or a type of 'sword'.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ElCoronelEsponja

Perhaps not a direct equivalent, but "Saskia" is used in English as a given name.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/lisax33

Isn't it in negative sentence "and" become "or" ?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JPChiUS
JPChiUS
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Not necessarily. They could be saying that their names are not that combination - "our names are not William and Saskia. They are William and Bertha!"

7 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jennesy
jennesy
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Frustrated that "William" doesn't count as the Dutch translation!

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Schani_

I would expect person names not to be translated.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jabramsohn
jabramsohn
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I'd think it would depend. If there is a well known equivalent, such as with Willem and William or Roos and Rose, then both should be accepted. This would apply to many European and Biblical names.

If there is no traditional or well known equivalent, then of course only the original can be accepted.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Jun-Dai
Jun-Dai
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I guess it does now--it just accepted it for me.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Merlijntje

"Our names aren't Willem and Saskia" should also be a right translation in my opinion.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/El2theK
El2theK
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It is already accepted

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/frankmp40

what's the difference between ons and onze

11 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Simius
Simius
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"Ons" is for het-words, "onze" for de-words.

6 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ZacharyMat179991

Why is niet in that part of the sentence?

3 weeks ago