"Ik raak mijn bord aan."

Translation:I touch my plate.

4 years ago

44 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/IriskMike
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what purpose does 'aan' have in this sentence?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/stefott
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'touch' is 'aanraken' in Dutch. So 'aan' doesn't really have a purpose here, it's just part of the verb.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/bazy1

I read a good linguistic explanation for this general concept once. Its not that 'aan' has no purpose, its that in Dutch the meaning of the verb 'to touch' is understood as 'to touch on.' In different languages the way directionality is understood is sometimes different/more/less-specific than in other languages.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/johaquila
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It's actually reach on, because raken on its own means reach. In this case the preposition is part of the verb, but of course there are also verbs and prepositions that just go together well and are still separate.

Things are actually quite similar in English except that a verb and a preposition that changes its meaning completely (e.g. come out in the sense of outing, fall over in the sense of topple) are not considered as a unit.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Common-Wealth
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Good point. I never thought about those aspects of English verbs+preposition in relation to their Germanic ancestry.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Eijei3

Phrasal verbs: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Phrasal_verb

Could this be considered a phrasal verb in Dutch?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/johaquila
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No, it's more than that. In English there are (1) verbs that just happen to be combined with a preposition, (2) phrasal verbs and (3) verbs that have a preposition as a prefix.

In Dutch these exist as well, but there is also (2.5) separable verbs.

Think of it this way: Sometimes (1) a specific verb/preposition combination is used so often that it becomes (2) a phrasal verb; and in Dutch, sometimes a phrasal verb is used so often that (2.5) the preposition becomes part of the non-finite forms (infinitive and participles) of the verb. And sometimes a separable verb is used so often that (3) the preposition becomes part of the verb even in the finite verb forms.

Examples in English: (2) do over, (3) overdo. Separable verbs in Dutch behave as if these two verbs were combined into one as follows:

"Do him over [finite verb form, behaves like a phrasal verb] but don't overdo [non-finite verb form (infinitive), behaves like a prefix-verb] it."

Or let's put it this way: If English had separable verbs, and if look up (or rather: uplook) were one of them, then the following would be correct:

"You should uplook this word. But I know you are not a great uplooker. I think yesterday you looked another word up successfully. I think when you look this one up you will realise that it's actually a nice experience. A bit of uplooking won't do you any harm."

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/RiridJatmiko
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Ooh. I see. Like a trennbare in Deutsch

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ofred19
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Yeah, it's a separable verb. Most Germanic languages have them. For the most part the separable portion of the verb is idiomatic and you're better off memorizing it as one singular verb "aanrakken". For example consider the English sentence "I called my friend up" or "I cleaned up my plate" or "I cleared off the table" or "I pulled a shirt on". Eventually you'll get a feel for how they work and be able to guess what the separable verb means based on the root verb and what preposition they're using.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/carloscids
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Nice explanation

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/FaerieArbear

I am making my plate uncomfortable

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/turner227
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So Dutch has separable verbs like German?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Rhynn
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Yes!

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Jun-Dai
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Yuck :-)

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/petertrainor
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Nooooooooooooo! But thanks :)

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Kreilyn
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I don't understand this verb and neither this sentence..!

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Klgregonis
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And English- although we don't write them as single words _ put up with, (that's something I won't put up with.) get off, (Get this bug off of me) look up (He looks the word up in the dictionary.)

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/johaquila
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These are phrasal verbs. The same thing exists in Dutch and German as well, but separable verbs are different. It's not just that they are written together in certain situations - that would be merely a difference of orthography. Even the order of words is reversed for the so-called infinite verb forms, i.e. the ones which are not marked for person and number. (This definition barely makes sense for English, so what it really means is those verb forms which are not marked for person and number in close relatives of English.) If your examples were separable verbs rather than phrasal verbs, their infinitives and present/past participles (the infinite verb forms) would be:

  • (to) upwithput, upwithputting, upwithput
  • (to) offget, offgetting, offgot[ten]
  • (to) uplook, uplooking, uplooked.
4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/stefandejager

this is why i have a love-hate relationship with the germanic languages

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/anfyddiwr
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Oh god separable verbs. weeps I can't tell you how often I've tried to read a sentence in German, unable to figure out why it makes no sense, before it occurs to me to look at the far end of the sentence for the rest of the verb.

Have any of you read Mark Twain's essay on learning German? The whole thing is gut-bustingly funny, but there's a paragraph devoted to separable verbs that's especially amusing, and applicable here.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/PaulineStinson
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Haven't read it yet, but it sounds interesting!

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/smcunning

I really wish that the 'Tips & Notes' section would include information about separable verbs. That would be so helpful!

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Brendanjones1

Agreed! Shouldn't have to turn to the comments to understand why I'm wrong.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Lull0000

I just want to say that I'm really happy to see that the separable verbs are identified in this course. For the German course, an example like this would just tell you that "raak" means reach, so then you would type something like "I reach to my plate." and get it wrong because you're not informed that "aanraken" is a word. That was one of the most frustrating things in that course that I complained about constantly, so it's great to see this one was designed to eliminate that issue. Great job!

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SkillsInPills

I got this wrong because I didn't know what the hell it was talking about. I didn't see it given as "aanraken" on the mouse over.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/stripedkitty
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Well, the only place I saw that aanraken was a word was above, in the discussion. The sentence translates the word 'raak' as touch. Then, at the end of the sentence, you see that 'aan' is 'on' and it's like the situation you had learning German ('I touch my plate on' ; 'I touch on my plate'). The tips explained placing or not placing a 't' at the end of a verb, something much easier to figure out than these split verbs, I think.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/BryanHoa
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Does "raken" mean something by itself ?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/johaquila
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It can mean lots of things, in various contexts:

  • come, get (raken, raakte, is geraakt)
  • meet, touch (raken, raakte, heeft geraakt)
4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/BryanHoa
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and can it be associated with other prepositions ?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/johaquila
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According to a Dutch rhyming dictionary:

aanraken (touch), afraken (lose), losraken (disjoin, refloat), opraken (run out, peter), vastraken (entangle), wegraken (be/get lost), zoekraken (get lost)

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/dbassi
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Sometimes the verbs are split up like that in Dutch. The prefix comes at the end and the stem/root verb is left to function directly as the word.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Nagwense

So you can't say 'Iemand raakt aan iets.' it must be 'Iemand raakt iets aan'?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/dbassi
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I don't think so. You could probably say 'Iemand aanraakt iets' or what the exercise said.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Rhynn
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No, you wouldn't be able to say 'Iemand aanraakt iets'. It's always 'Iemand raakt iets aan'!

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Arturo_Z
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I don't awnderstand this sentece at all!!! Please help

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/johaquila
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I guess your problem is with the separable verb aanraken. It's explained in some of the other posts. Aanraken means touch, but it consists of aan = on and raken = reach. So basically in Dutch they say on-reach for touch, and then even do weird things with the two constituents on and reach:

Ik vind het leuk, mijn bord aan te raken. = I like [it] my board on to reach. = I like to on-reach my board. = I like to touch my board.

Ik raak mijn bord aan. = I reach my board on. = I on-reach my board. = I touch my board.

English used to have this as well, and there are still some remnants left.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/GisellaSB

Dish and plate !

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/malcolmissimo

I guess you mean that "dish" should be accepted as well as "plate". I got this marked wrong. Or is there a more correct word for "dish"?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/RuiSoares13

Once the word aan is present ....i think it should be " i touch on my plate "

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/El2theK
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The verb = aanraken, which separates to Ik raak aan.

Aanraken = to touch

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Rendi405

I couldn't understand the meaning bcuz of the "aan" at the end so I made a joke by translating it into "I hit on my plate"

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/eman908424

why at the end "een"

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/johaquila
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It's een, not aan, from the separable verb aanraken: "Ik raak aan."

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/BewilderedBunny

Is there a reason this keeps marking me wrong? I keep trying to type it in, and it says it's wrong. Even copied and pasted the answer. Didn't work out.

1 year ago
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