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"Paul takes care of product delivery."

Translation:Paul s'occupe de la livraison des produits.

April 13, 2020

19 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/plafond43

Why has product being translated/accepted as plural? Produits?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Sitesurf

"Product delivery" is a noun adjunct construction where "product" is used as an adjective, hence its singular form.

But the man surely delivers more than one product and it shows in the French translation where "produits" is and remains a noun, and in the plural:

  • La livraison des produits = the delivery of the products

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/GraemeSarg

And what if the company only makes one product?

That would need to be "la livraison du produit".

Surely it is better to use "la livraison de produit" which covers both.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/GraemeSarg

Actually it looks as if "produit" might only be usable as a mass noun when it means "income", not when it means "output", which seems a bit weird. Is that right?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Sitesurf

I'm not sure about this but I seem to remember that in accounting terms, "produit(s)" can come in the singular or the plural depending on what you are talking about.

"Produit" (product or produce) is a mass noun when you treat it as such, as in "étaler du produit sur la surface", meaning "some of it".

A guy in charge of delivering things will probably deliver several or many, even if the company is a mono-product manufacturer; otherwise, it'll go bankrupt.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/GraemeSarg

But in Anglo-American corporate speak we would talk about delivering "the product" regardless of how many product lines there are, and job functions (not just titles) are usually labelled in corporate speak.

I guess that hasn't filtered into French yet.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SamSuitt

The immediately preceding example for translation was "Paul s'occupe de la livraison de produit." The correct translation was the exact sentence here. Yet the answer here is "..... des produits." What the heck are we to make of this contradiction? Which is correct? How is it possible for BOTH to be correct for the exact same sentence?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/GraemeSarg

Your recollection appears to be faulty.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/gdobei

Paul s'occupe de la livraison DE produits

also accepted (not sure if that's correct)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Sitesurf

It is correct and actually the best translation for "product delivery".

  • "La livraison des (= de+les) produits" is a possessive case and should be the translation for "the products' delivery".

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/QamarMunir

wouldn't it be simpler to accept that duo is wrong!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Sitesurf

That's exactly what I explained.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/QamarMunir

In English some people say 'beating about the bush'.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Sitesurf

The OP was not sure if Duo was wrong. I explained why Duo's translation was wrong. Now @gdobei and possibly others reading the discussion know for sure how to differentiate a noun of noun from a possessive case.

Did you expect me to answer, "Yes, DL is wrong"? Sentence discussion forums are not meant to distribute good and bad points but to contribute to deepening users' understanding of the target language.

By the way, I am not on Duolingo's payroll. I am a volunteer Moderator and Contributor.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Bekir978479

why de la this time?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/GraemeSarg

Because it is "of" + "the".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/brooklynlola

Can you use prendre de soin? I did (Paul prend soin de la livraison des produits.) and got it wrong, so I'm assuming this is the wrong context for this choice, but would love to know for sure.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Sitesurf

"Prendre soin de" is a set phrase.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/GraemeSarg

I think the question was whether it's an appropriate set phrase or an inappropriate set phrase.

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