"Een hond rent achter een kat aan."

Translation:A dog is running after a cat.

4 years ago

23 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/spanishzacd

If aanrennen means to run after and achter means after isn't this sentence redundant?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/WarmFoothills

The verb is achteraanrennen.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/angelica.d10

according to google is achteraan rennen

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/marcuslangford

They should call it "often wrong Google"

(A star trek:tng joke for those who don't know.)

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/kobajagiprinceza

to chase (after) - to run after

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/bszalay26
bszalay26
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Why is "aan" needed here? Couldn't the sentence be just "Een hond rent achter een kat."?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/johaquila
johaquila
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That would be: "A dog is running behind a cat." It might be accidental, or they might be in a race. A dog that is running 'after' a cat tries to reach the cat so that things can get interesting. A dog that is running behind a cat may be hunting elephants together with the cat and, feeling a bit uneasy about the next step, may gladly give its feline pal precedence.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SingingScientist

I believe (but I'm not sure), that aanrennen is a verb that means "to run after" as in "to chase." Compound verbs like this split apart and the preposition at the beginning, "aan," gets relocated to the end of the clause. It's part of the Dutch grammar/word order. http://www.dutchgrammar.com/ is a good reference.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/skyehoppers
skyehoppers
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Then what's the achter doing there?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/kobajagiprinceza

rennen - to run

aanrennen, rennen ... aan - to chase ...

achteraanrennen, rennen achter ... aan - to chase after ...

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Objectivist
Objectivist
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'achter' means the same as 'after' in this context.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Ikamjh
Ikamjh
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Why didn't it accept my answer of "The dog chases behind the cat"?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/johaquila
johaquila
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It's not proper English. The dog chases the cat or chases after the cat if it tries to reach the cat. It runs behind the cat if it doesn't try to reach the cat. It makes no sense for the dog to chase (i.e. try to reach) behind (i.e. without trying to reach) the cat.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/matanov
matanov
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https://www.duolingo.com/gboycolor

Am I the only one that instinctively writes "hound" for "hond", instead of "dog"?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/grdell

No. No you are not.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/adnejossing
adnejossing
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I always write "Hund" because that is the Norwegian word

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JonesInPublic
JonesInPublic
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"aan" seems to have too many meanings and purposes to remember all of them :D

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jennesy
jennesy
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How come sometimes "achter" means behind and sometimes it means "after"?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/johaquila
johaquila
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If you run after someone, you are behind them.

You may also want to think of the achterdek = afterdeck of a boat as the behind of the boat.

In English, worse things have happened. The original meaning of fast is the same as Dutch vast: firm, fixed, hard, strong. Vestiges still exist, as in fast asleep. If you run fast in the original sense, you run rapidly. This is where the modern sense comes from.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/balage62

Can it be the same origin for "fasten" (your seat belts)?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/johaquila
johaquila
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Yes. Apparently even the verb to fast (abstain from eating) is related, though the connection is obscure even in German.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/WarmFoothills

Nearly all languages have made the connection between time and space (50,000 year before Einstein). Examples:

50,000 years before Einstein - He stands before me. I will see you in two minutes - I am in a house.

4 years ago
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