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  5. "Ik spreek Nederlands."

"Ik spreek Nederlands."

Translation:I speak Dutch.

July 19, 2014

46 Comments

Sorted by top post

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/tu.8zPhLD72zzoZN

Here is the positive version! Yes, I will say it until it is true.

July 27, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/cnano98

that is... a lot of languages

February 2, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/BewilderedBunny

...You took every bloody language option, didn't you?

August 10, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/tu.8zPhLD72zzoZN

.....afraid so....

August 10, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AngryPeasant

Soon my precious, soon ...

July 30, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/R_Andersson

Hoi, Angry Peasant? ❤❤❤ gaat es met Nederlands?

January 14, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/sf2k

why do we say Dutch in English if it's Nederlands in The Netherlands? It sounds like we confused German ("Deutsch") and Dutch as the same word.

April 9, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Susande

Short answer: it's not wrong, but it's linked to some complicated history and no clear distinction between the languages Dutch and German and their predecessors.

Long answer:

I'm no expert, but what I could quickly find about it:

It goes back to the late Middle ages when a early forms of Dutch and German were spoken: dietsc and duutsc refer to variants of the Germanic languages. These terms were mostly used to distinguish both Dutch and German from Roman languages and can apply to either Dutch or German. The distinction between Dutch and (low-)German (Nederlands en (Neder-)Duits) was not that clear.

The English word Dutch is derived from duutsc or duutsch

Also in Dutch the word Duits (current meaning: German) was used to refer to Dutch (Nederlands) up to the 17th century. This can for instance be seen in the Dutch national anthem (sung from the perspective of Willem van Oranje), the second line is:

ben ik, van Duitsen bloed (am I, of Dutch/German blood)

Also see this explanation in Dutch: https://nl.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nederlands_(naamsgeschiedenis)#.C3.9Eeudisk_in_de_volkstaal

October 6, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Alphathon

All I'd really add to that would be that as I understand it the term(s) which ultimately became Dutch in English and Deutsch in German meant something like "vernacular" and/or "of our people". The Dutch used the words mentioned to designate themselves and their language as the Germans do today. We (English speakers) adopted their term as our term for them. However, we already had a term for the region that is now Germany (what was the the Holy Roman Empire), which was derived from the Latin Germania, so we used that instead to refer to Germany, German and Germans.

April 8, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AdrianaVink810

Technically, native speakers call 'Dutch' 'Nederlands' which is also on DuoLingo I believe...

June 19, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/deathofthewest

Does 'Nederlands' specifically mean the Dutch (as opposed to Belgian) dialect of Dutch? Would someone in Belgium, speaking Flemish, say 'Ik spreek Nederlands' (differences in the grammar of the sentence aside)?

November 9, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/OscarHermosilla

As my Belgian teacher says. 'Nederlads' is the official language both in The Netherlands and in Belgium (Flemish region and Brussels) . Flemish is a dialect.

November 13, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/OscarHermosilla

'Nederlands' sorry, I forgot the 'n'

November 13, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ReneeDubuc

I'm no expert, but they would say, "Ik spreek vlaams." "Vlaams" is Flemish for Flemish.

December 14, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Susande

It's as OscarHermosilla mentioned, there's only one language spoken in The Netherlands, Belgium and Suriname. The only odd thing is that there is a term for the group of dialects spoken in Flanders, but there is no term for the group of dialects spoken in the Netherlands.

It's fine to say Ik ben een Vlaming en ik spreek Vlaams just as it's fine to say Ik ben een Brabander en ik spreek Brabants.

August 10, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Nngpi

"there is no term for the group of dialects spoken in the Netherlands" Sure there is, at least in Belgium and most of the rest of the world, it's called 'Hollands'. Of course this is a historical inaccuracy caused by tradesmen from Holland spreading the concept of 'Holland' worldwide, but it is what it is.

February 2, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SeanWWang

what's the difference between, Nederland, Nederlands, Nederlander, Nederlanders

April 5, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/IneseKarav

Nederland is the country, Nederlands is the language, Nederlander is a citizen of NL and Nederlanders is a plural form of Nederlander.

October 6, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Ninaliebe345

I am learning

January 6, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Paultato

Should I completely ignore 'r' in pronouncing "Nederlands"? She's saying it like " needle lands".

September 27, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Susande

Nope. The r is indeed pronounced softly (even very softly by some people), but it definitely is pronounced.

October 6, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PALewis88

So would it be "Ik spreekt niet Nederlands."?

October 20, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/bler

I'm the same level as you, but I would guess it would be "Ik spreek geen Nederlands." The sentence in German would be "Ich spreche kein Niederländisch" or more colloquially "Ich kann kein Niederländisch."

November 18, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AdrianaVink810

"Ik spreek geen Nederlands"

June 19, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/gg_allin_1001

Does the "i" in "ik" have to be capitalized like the English "I" or does it have to not be capitalized? Or could it be written either way?

September 22, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Susande

Nope not like in English, it's just a normal word, so it is only capitalised here because it's the first word of the sentence.

October 6, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/donate11o

I got it wrong for typing "Ik spreek Nederlandse". Is there a reason for this?

December 13, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Nierls

Because Nederlandse means Dutchwoman or is the adjective for Dutch.

The language is "Nederlands".

December 13, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ReneeDubuc

How do you say, "Like a boss" in Dutch?

December 14, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Nierls

"Als een baas", it's actually a sentence in the Dutch course. ;)

December 14, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ReneeDubuc

No way! Which section?

December 14, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/selenaid

Why do we use 'spreek' instead of 'spreekt'?

July 2, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/El2theK

Because it's the 1st person singular.

July 2, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/selenaid

Thank you, I realize it regards to the verb conjugation!

July 2, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/leyciipuccino

Is SP pronounced like in German or just a simple S then P connected?

August 28, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/tu.8zPhLD72zzoZN

Not like in German; scroll up and read all of the moderator Susande's responses. She has already answered this and here is another place to listen to different people saying this very sentence: https://forvo.com/word/ik_spreek_geen_nederlands/#nl

August 10, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/aviatti

Now that's more like it! :D

February 1, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/dont_tread_on_me

nog niet

October 2, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/BridgeToWisdom

I am not an English native speaker so I have this question: Do we also capitalize languages’ names in Dutch?

February 2, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Nngpi

Yes, language names and nationalities are considered proper names/nouns ('eigennamen'), so they're capitalised in Dutch.

February 2, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MegtheEgg58

How do I remember when to use spreek instead os spreekt?

November 23, 2016

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Alphathon

For the word spreken you could think of it as ik and spreek both ending in a k. However, it may be more useful to learn the general rules for Dutch verbs. Generally the 1st person singular form of a verb (that’s the ik form) doesn’t have any ending added to it (so spreek); all other singular forms add -t (so jij spreekt). Plurals add -(e)n and if there is a doubled letter in the middle it becomes a single one (so wij spreken). It isn’t always that simple but usually follows that structure. Important exceptions include hebben, which changes to jij hebt but hij/zij/het heeft, and zijn, which changes to ik ben, jij bent and hij/zij/het is.

November 24, 2016
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