1. Forum
  2. >
  3. Topic: Spanish
  4. >
  5. "Ella puede tratar de ir."

"Ella puede tratar de ir."

Translation:She can try to go.

May 5, 2013

73 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Linguismo

Could anyone tell me why the 'de' is here? Is it something to do with changing the meaning of tratar?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Amy.Holland

"tratar de" means to try to "tratar" alone means to treat


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/elliottspoon

Can you give me an example and use "tartar" alone in a sentence.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/kwcIII

I like to put tartar sauce on my fish sanwich


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/FaizaMazhar

This was CLASSIC!!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/amble2lingo

We've had at least one here in Duo which went something like: "Él trata sus empleados muy bien." He treats his employees very well. Another example: "El doctor la trata para la diabetes." The doctor treats her for diabetes.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Kama410

Tell her don't take the Metformin!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Barry681338

Thanks! Starting to understand the idioms when read. Just need to memorize them I guess.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/BoredWithDuoNow

How to use it in the imperative?

Trátalo - treat it

Can it mean try it or would that be pruébalo?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/wadetro

Is "she can try to escape" not as acceptable. Makes more sense to me, even though there is no context.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/rmcgwn

That would be 'ella puede tratar de escapar'


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MauroQuil

It only works for the specific context where the challenge is to leave somewhere. It does not fit the case where the challenge is to get somewhere.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RandallMiles

Since "escape" is one the hints in the drop-down I think it ought to be accepted. I also think that "she can try to go out" should be accepted as that is also one of the hints.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Trholter

I also put "she can try to go out" but it was not accepted, yet it is offered in the drop downs.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mitaine56

randall- all hints are not accepted. They're related words sometimes, but not the correct translation. Stick with the first one, it's always correct.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RandallMiles

Yes, you are right, not all hints are correct. However, the first one is not always correct. I have seen a number of times where none of the hints were correct.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/OmaJennie

That's just stupid. If the definitions in the drop-down are not acceptable (i.e. correct alternatives), they should not be included in the drop-down; and, DL should make an on-site dictionary easily available. Also, the first one is not always correct, And, frequently the first one does not make sense in the sentence.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Trholter

I feel like this is the problem I'm having too - when I'm stuck I try to figure it out from the drop downs but its not helpful. That frustrates me to no end.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DavidMoore622957

That's always the case with dictionaries, especially if they do not provide examples to help you understand how a meaning is applied. This is simply a fact of life with these hints.

On the other hand, when you do check a definition via that mechanism, it signals to Duo that you don't have full command of its meaning and you will encounter more sentences with the word to translate. So, the true value may be training Duo to drill you where you need more exposure.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DavidMoore622957

And they should try to resolve the tensions in the Middle East.

You know, there is a limit to how much can be accomplished behind the scenes of a free language learning program. If you find the "drop-down" hints/definitions to be misleading or of limited utility, you should stop using them as an infallible guide. Apparently, you will be better off.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ktgumbo

I said "she can try to leave" - is there something wrong with that?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AyoTa.SA

Hola, ktgumbo, that would be ''Ella puede tratar de salir'' I hope that may help you ;-) Saludos.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JillHanson

"Ir" means to go. I know I hate that too. For me to go and to leave mean the same things, but to leave is "salir" I believe


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/clawedinvader

To do that, I think that you'd either have to use 'salir', as AyoTa.SA suggested, or use 'irse'.

I'm not 100% sure on how to use 'irse' properly, so it would be great if someone could back me up or correct me, I can translate it just fine, but I sometimes struggle getting the words right myself as I am still learning.

Basically, as far as I understand it, 'ir' means 'to go', whereas 'irse' means 'to leave'. So in order for it to be "she can try to leave", I think that it would be "Ella se puede tratar de ir" (or ''Ella puede tratar de salir'' as AyoTa.SA said.)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/amble2lingo

I think it would have to be "Ella puede tratar de irse" so that the "se" doesn't get mixed up with the other verbs.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/boricua022708

Tratar e intentar... Intercambiables?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/amble2lingo

Sí. Las palabras "tratar de" (no te olvidas el "de") e "intentar" quieren decir las mismas.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/HihotPL

Probar vs Tratar - Difference?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/amble2lingo

"Probar" means "to try" in the sense of to taste, to try on clothing, to test or prove. "Tratar de" means "to try to" in the sense of expending effort to accomplish something.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PALdosSantos

Wouldn't "attempt to go" also be correct?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JesusSaves...

de has to be the most confusing preposition on earth. Or maybe it para.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Arancaytar

tratar vs. intentar?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/amble2lingo

"Tratar" = to treat. "Tratar DE" = to try to and is a synonym for "intentar."


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/CrocodileBird

What is the meaning of this?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/yougotiger

Hotel California? Last lines of the classic Eagles song: "You can check-out any time you like, But you can never leave! " (http://www.azlyrics.com/lyrics/eagles/hotelcalifornia.html)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Mizz_Nix

I put "she can try to go out" and DL marked it as wrong.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/manosdefie

A lot of verbs in this sentence.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ginagillen

what is wrong with "she may try to go"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/amble2lingo

So far in these lessons, Duo has been consistently adamant about using "can" for "poder."


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ginagillen

thanks amble2lingo


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Tacotore

She can try to leave shouldv'e been accepted right?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/TrillianneShadow

The infinitive "salir" means to leave


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/thefluent1

Why not intento or intenta?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/amble2lingo

You could use "intentar" here (Ella puede intentar ir), but you would have to use the infinitive, not a conjugated form of the verb.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/CaptainPringle

"She can try to leave" is wrong?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/amble2lingo

I think you would need to use the reflexive form of "ir," "irse" to mean "leave." "Ella puede tratar de irse" = She can try to leave.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AQU2

It is a little strange that this is in a lesson before they cover the verb ir. I would have expected these to be in a different order.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jallenq

Why is there a de? isn't de --of?


[deactivated user]

    Why not "Leave" instead of go?


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/amble2lingo

    You'd need to say: Ella puede tratar de irSE. Ir = to go. Irse = to leave.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/bweera

    Shouldn't it be "Ella puede tratar a ir". According to what I have learnt so far.. 'a' is "to". de is "of" or "from". I find learning Spanish is very confusing with this program


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/amble2lingo

    Spanish prepositions are difficult because there isn't always a one-for-one correspondence to English and a preposition can change the meaning of the verb it follows, which is the case here. "Tratar de" means "to try to." Take a look at the following link. Scroll down to "tratar de" and look at some of the others. Don't try to digest the whole page at once, but be sure to bookmark it to refer to it when you need it.
    http://users.ipfw.edu/jehle/COURSES/vrbsprep.htm

    I don't think Duo was ever meant to be a stand-alone program. It needs to be supplemented by other resources: these discussions, a good dictionary, maybe a good grammar book, and the internet. There's a lot to learn. Keep at it!


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DavidMoore622957

    A lingot for your sage advice.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/LCarminati

    Does someone knows if "Ella puede tratar de ir" has the same meaning than the portuguese expression "Ela pode tratar de ir"?


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Lynne926934

    Try and go or try to go are same in English English. It's idiomatic use.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mikepedrosa

    to leave is not accepted ? why?


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/sawone

    leave, go same thing


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/akili.alex

    Ir alone is go?


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/CannonWolf

    If one of the listed definitions of IR is (to) escape, why isn't "She can try to escape" accepted?


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/TrillianneShadow

    Mmkay... Seguro. Eso no es escalofriante en todo.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/angi1234

    She can try to walk? Why is this not accepted?


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/amble2lingo

    "Ir" basically means "to go." For "to walk" you would need to use "caminar" or "andar."


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/novalsi

    Why not "she can try to go out"?


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/amble2lingo

    If DL had meant "to go out," I think they would have used "salir" instead of "ir."
    http://www.spanishdict.com/translate/salir
    http://www.spanishdict.com/translate/ir


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AlanS.6

    When I hear the expression "tratar de hacer X", it usually has a warning tone (at least in the American Spanish) that this exercise doesn't quite convey: "She'd better go," or "She'd better be able to go."


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Song-of-Sunlight

    Why is "go out" given as a translation of ir if it's marked as incorrect?


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/_LilM_

    When hovering over the words, it says "She can deal with it". It really confuses me when I get it wrong every single time and it has a different translation. It's like a whole different meaning :[


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Tarek_C

    Can 'intentar' work here Instead of 'tratar de'?


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DavidMoore622957

    Most definitely.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/CarolynH.3

    These exercise are the WORST I've had because word definitions or phrases vary do much, I don't know which one to use!!!!!

    Learn Spanish in just 5 minutes a day. For free.