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"Het kind heeft een vraag over de verkoop van ouders."

Translation:The child has a question about the sale of parents.

2
4 years ago

22 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/eliseugeisler
eliseugeisler
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Is this Calvin trying to sell his father because his polls are low?

70
Reply23 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/schiffmeister
schiffmeister
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This is no weirder in English than it is in Dutch. Strange, strange sentence.

40
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Rekty
Rekty
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What's strange about selling our parents? There is a big business here over Belgium and the Netherlands. We buy, sell and produce parents like little bunnies!

10
Reply311 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/marioesuc

Hahahaha!! You've won a lingot...

2
Reply9 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/christian
christian
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Is there something I'm missing or this just a weird sentence?

18
Reply14 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Simius
Simius
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You know, when kids are tired of their old parents and want to buy a new pair. They need to inform themselves properly before such a purchase...

66
Reply64 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Rhynn
Rhynn
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Exactly :)

14
Reply14 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/PaulineStinson
PaulineStinson
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indeed, don't throw out your old shoes... ;)

1
Reply2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/wataya
wataya
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I guess "verkoop van ouders" could also be interpreted as a legal term. (Just guessing, perhaps a native can comment on that)

Googling the phrase gives me

"Verkoop van ouders aan kinderen wordt algauw volledig als een schenking aanzien"

As to the English translation: yes, weird :)

0
Reply4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Hokusai_1
Hokusai_1
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I am a native Dutch speaker and this sentence is weird in Dutch too, it is just an element of humor in the course, by the way I finished three trees and I found the English-Dutch the most difficult one, that's weird. ;)

16
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Tina_in_Bristol
Tina_in_Bristol
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Dutch was the first course I did, so I expected them all to be this surreal. I've now started Russian, and it's much more deadpan, and even bleak at times. A recent translation exercise was: "I agree, everything's bad, and it's not going to get any better." I'm not sure if course content is a reflection of national character, or just national climate. I'm also learning phrases like: "Welcome to Siberia!", and: "It was minus 20 yesterday". In those conditions, there may well be little to smile about.

16
Reply2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/KiloJam
KiloJam
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Some wealthy Japanese families have a custom of adopting talented adult males if they don't have a son to take over their business. Yet if the person is still not legally an adult, the sentence would be somewhat normal within that context. But again, we're learning Dutch, not Japanese!

13
Reply4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/wucnuc
wucnuc
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Wouldn't that be the sale of a child, if money changed hands?

0
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/schiffmeister
schiffmeister
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Parents are being sold in this case, not children.

3
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AMB408215
AMB408215
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The German-French course is a lot more boring, and also English-Welsh. English-Dutch seems to be special when it comes to humour.

5
Reply2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/OnkelD
OnkelD
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Could this not be "The child has a question about the parents' sale?" if not, then what would be the difference in how to say that? Thanks in advance.

3
Reply1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Spiritman

That would be "de verkoop van de ouders", which would refer to some specific parents. The question says "de verkoop van ouders" which means parents in general (non-specific). EDIT: Just to clarify, in the phrase "the parents' sale", the article ('the') belongs to "parents'", not to "sale".

3
Reply1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/dudrich
dudrich
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So is the child looking to buy or sell?

2
Reply2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/HoareSimon

The kid's just a middle man, a front for an international parent trafficking ring.

14
Reply12 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Spiritman

Savage. (edit: That's a compliment.)

2
Reply2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/monkey_47
monkey_47
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Is "verkoop van..." really correctly translated as as "sale of..." or should it be "sale by..."? To me it sounds like parents are selling something and the child has a question about the sale, not that parents are being sold.

0
Reply1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/El2theK
El2theK
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It doesn't mean sale by, the parents are being sold.

1
Reply1 month ago