Duolingo is the most popular way to learn languages in the world. Best of all, it's 100% free!

"Do you have pants?"

Translation:Hebben jullie broeken?

4 years ago

24 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/Hall-Robert

My dutch wife says the singular, heb jij broek? is fine too. The English sentence has 4 possible translations, as you can be singular or plural, and trousers can be singular or plural.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AlexLlewel1

It's probably worth using the word trousers rather than pants here as that means underpants in uk

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Susande
Susande
  • 21
  • 13
  • 12
  • 11
  • 93

It's an English (US) - Dutch course, so we're using the US spelling and common words as preferred translation. We try to accept spelling and alternative translations of the other standard English forms (UK, IE, CA, AU, NZ, ZA) as well, but it's possible that alternatives are missing in the accepted answers, because they are not added yet or we don't know them (we only have US and UK native speakers in the team). That's why we're depending on users to use the report a problem button during lessons to report errors and missing alternative translations.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JeffHK
JeffHKPlus
  • 25
  • 20
  • 14
  • 12
  • 11
  • 6
  • 2

Bless you!

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Ikamjh
Ikamjh
  • 22
  • 16
  • 10
  • 7

Why not "heeft jij broeken"?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ccf63
ccf63
  • 13
  • 10
  • 8
  • 4
  • 2

The verb is wrongly conjugated. It should be "Heb jij/je" in this case, because the pronoun comes after the verb.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/iamcivilized

I had this question as a "select all that are correct". I had the option of "Hebben jullie broeken" and "hebben jullie broek" and some other one that was definitely wrong. I was under the impression that pants could imply both a pair of pants (broek) AND multiple pairs of pants (broeken). And so I selected both and got it wrong. Am I wrong in thinking this?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/msmith1047

I think it's because "Hebben jullie broek?" should actually be "Hebben jullie een broek?" to mean "Do you have pants (singular)?" So it's wrong because it's gramatically incorrect.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/iamcivilized

ah. that actually now makes perfect sense thanks!

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/HelenLambe

Why can't it be "heb jij broeken?"

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ChristianW393706
ChristianW393706
  • 24
  • 20
  • 13
  • 9
  • 6
  • 629

Because it is "Hebt jij broeken?"

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/IgorHenriqueA
IgorHenriqueA
  • 22
  • 19
  • 17
  • 13
  • 12
  • 10
  • 9
  • 7
  • 7
  • 7
  • 6
  • 5
  • 3
  • 2
  • 2
  • 2
  • 2

Actually i believe the verb 'drops' the 'T' in case it comes before the subject

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Brijsven
Brijsven
  • 18
  • 13
  • 11
  • 9
  • 8
  • 8
  • 7
  • 7
  • 7
  • 7
  • 6
  • 5
  • 4
  • 4
  • 4
  • 4
  • 4
  • 4
  • 4
  • 4
  • 3
  • 3
  • 2
  • 2
  • 2
  • 2
  • 2
  • 2
  • 2

The 'T' is not always dropped when the primary Subject and Verb become inverted. When inversion (verb placed before the subject) occurs, the 'T' is dropped for most verbs in the 2nd person singular informal (jij/je).

– Inversion occurs primarily under two circumstances:

1,) Questions

2,) When other clauses (i.e. co-ordinating, subordinate, relative) are present. This, however, is beyond the scope of this lesson.

– For the 2nd person singular formal (U) and the 3rd person singular, the 'T' remains intact to the verb during inversion. Compare the following three examples:

• "Gaat u naar de kerk?" -- Are you (formal/polite) going to the church? (notice how the vowel length is maintained with 'gaat' due to maintaining the 'T')

• "Ga je naar de kerk?" -- Are you (informal) going to the church?

• "Gaat ze naar de kerk?" -- Is she going to the church?

– Another example, compare:

• "Ben jij/je (een) student?" -- Are you a student?

• "Bent u (een) student?" -- Are you (formal/polite) a student?

– Additionally when the primary (finite/conjugated) verb is 'hebben', you may see either of the following forms used with the 2nd person singular formal/polite (depending on the dialect/region):

• "Hebt U/u ... ?"

• "Heeft U/u ... ?"

(Edit: Accidentally included 1st person singular in explanation; cleaned up post and added some formatting)

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/IgorHenriqueA
IgorHenriqueA
  • 22
  • 19
  • 17
  • 13
  • 12
  • 10
  • 9
  • 7
  • 7
  • 7
  • 6
  • 5
  • 3
  • 2
  • 2
  • 2
  • 2

Nice explanation, but you didn't say anything about 3rd person, i guess we never drop the 'T'? And i don't understand what you said about the 1st person, i thought 1st person was never meant to have any 'T' at all

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Brijsven
Brijsven
  • 18
  • 13
  • 11
  • 9
  • 8
  • 8
  • 7
  • 7
  • 7
  • 7
  • 6
  • 5
  • 4
  • 4
  • 4
  • 4
  • 4
  • 4
  • 4
  • 4
  • 3
  • 3
  • 2
  • 2
  • 2
  • 2
  • 2
  • 2
  • 2

Apologies for the confusion -- I did not intend to include the 1st person singular. I edited my post to reflect the 3rd person singular.

Feel free to comment on my profile page if you have any questions or would like clarification. :)

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jayeidge
jayeidge
  • 23
  • 14
  • 13
  • 8
  • 7
  • 5
  • 4
  • 3
  • 8

always?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/IgorHenriqueA
IgorHenriqueA
  • 22
  • 19
  • 17
  • 13
  • 12
  • 10
  • 9
  • 7
  • 7
  • 7
  • 6
  • 5
  • 3
  • 2
  • 2
  • 2
  • 2

i don't know, i saw this 'rule' in an exercise: ''ben je ---'' used instead of ''bent je''

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Brijsven
Brijsven
  • 18
  • 13
  • 11
  • 9
  • 8
  • 8
  • 7
  • 7
  • 7
  • 7
  • 6
  • 5
  • 4
  • 4
  • 4
  • 4
  • 4
  • 4
  • 4
  • 4
  • 3
  • 3
  • 2
  • 2
  • 2
  • 2
  • 2
  • 2
  • 2

Not always. Have a look at my reply to IgorHenriqueA above. :)

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MentalPinball
MentalPinball
  • 21
  • 13
  • 12
  • 11
  • 9
  • 7
  • 6
  • 3
  • 24

Only in the case of je/jij.

4 days ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MentalPinball
MentalPinball
  • 21
  • 13
  • 12
  • 11
  • 9
  • 7
  • 6
  • 3
  • 24

When there's inversion, of course.

4 days ago

https://www.duolingo.com/kealiiballao
kealiiballao
  • 14
  • 9
  • 8
  • 5
  • 4
  • 4
  • 3
  • 2
  • 2

It's ambiguous when you need to translate from English to dutch. The example stated, you have no pants. It could mean two things. The person is wearing no pants at the moment, or has no pants at all in their possession. But in English, pants is both plural and singular. Like sheep. One sheep two sheep. One pants two pants. I posted an error request.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MentalPinball
MentalPinball
  • 21
  • 13
  • 12
  • 11
  • 9
  • 7
  • 6
  • 3
  • 24

Well, actually in English the translation for the singular form, broek, would be a pair of pants/trousers, just like we say a pair of scissors and never 'a scissors', which is completely ungrammatical.

Hope this helps.

4 days ago

https://www.duolingo.com/salems24

'jullie' is used to refer to a group whereas 'je' is used to refer to just one person... how do we know which it is here?

i translated to dutch from english where the phrase was 'do you have pants?'

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Susande
Susande
  • 21
  • 13
  • 12
  • 11
  • 93

There is no context, so you cannot know, that's why all possible correct translations are accepted.

3 years ago