"Fa tanto caldo."

Translation:It is very hot.

May 5, 2013

27 Comments
This discussion is locked.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/siebolt

In fact it says "It is SO hot" and "normal English" for that is "very hot". "Non ho tanto tempo" = I don't have as much time (as I would need to do things properly) >> I don't have much time. Some other example: (ho due euro) > non ho molto denaro. More or less absolute, two euro is just not much. 'Ho tanto denaro" I have (so) much money.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/TheLotanos

Why "fa"? Isn't "è" fit there?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jgbachand

In many languages speaking about the weather is done idiomatically. Italian uses the verb "fare" (which, by the way is also done in French, who use "faire") to speak of the weather. "Fa freddo oggi" = "It's cold today", and the adjective is always in the masculine singular form. "Fa freddo/caldo/fresco/brutto...." BUT a different idiom when you want to say things like, "It's sunny today" = "C'e' il sole oggi." "C'e' il vento" = "It's windy." Hope this helps.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/FernandoPerez202

That's actually true in spanish we say "hace calor". Fa meaning "hace":)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/pguadagnini5994

That is what I thought!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/gizzard123

You'd think that "caldo" is cold. Instead it's hot. Easy to remember, at least.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mfriedenthal

Think of "cauldron".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jgbachand

What I don't understand is why "It is quite hot" is not accepted.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Queen_Ziga

what does this sentence have to do with Numbers practice?!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MadelynWri

I guess "tanto" (much / many) is a quantity measurement.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mimiducky

Yeah, I thought that molto would be used here, not tanto. Can someone clarify?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/BoTreasure

Please could someone explain when to use tanto and molto?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Jkrgeorge

Tanto or molto, what is the difference?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MosesS7

Is the direct translate It do very hot ?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MAUROJOAO

or : it is too hot


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Kayaf

Strangely, some idiomatic sayings of Italian is very similar to Turkish, if only I learnt Italian thru Turkish would have been great. Cos thru English is ineffective sadly. In Turkish we would say, "sıcak yaptı bugün" literally means: something (probobally god lol) made hot today.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/cognoscenti1965

what is wrong with "the weather is very hot"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/huesz

actually it doesnt say it is weather :)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MosesS7

Why not E' tanto caldo ?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MosesS7

does very hot ?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Caterinabella

In Italian, weather "does" something (does hot) rather than "be" something (is hot). I remember this from other helpful comments. Strange but true.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AndyP11

Could I use Così instead of Tanto in this sentence?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/michele.le8

This describes "fa" as "ago," "cut," or "plays." I'm semi fluent in Spanish and get the explanation that it's similar to "hace calor" but don't understand how these provided definitions tie in to this sentence. Did duo just leave out the relevant definition of "fa?"

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