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"Son de los años cincuenta."

Translation:They are from the fifties.

1
5 years ago

79 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/Brandon-Rollins

A bit of a quirk to the Spanish language, but I'm glad to know how to be able to reference the fifties, sixties, seventies, etc. But now that leaves the problem of how to reference the 00s. We don't even know in English!

102
Reply5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/tbiggles

They're called the "aughts" in English.

21
Reply4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/zombiesue

Where?

If you said that to me, I would have absolutely no idea what you are talking about

68
Reply4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AnnRon

More when than where. The folks that lived at the turn of the twentieth century referred to the years between 1900 and 1910 that way: 1903 was "aught three"; 1907 was "aught seven." It sounds very old-fashioned to this ear, but I remember hearing it when I was a child from elderly people reminiscing.

43
Reply24 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/The.Other.Caleb

I knew this from watching The Music Man, oddly enough.

1
Reply1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AurosHarman

I definitely refer to that decade as the aughts, for exactly the reason AnnRon notes -- it started as a somewhat humorous imitation of an antiquated way of talking about the 1900s, but then stuck because there was no better term for the 2000s.

16
Reply4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ludwig3655

Actually, a better term for the 2000s is the 2000s.

16
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AurosHarman

In text, maybe. (Or "the '00s".) In speech? "The two thousandses" is ugly, ambiguous (does it refer to the decade, the century, or the millennium?), and has way more syllables to boot.

14
3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/dunk999
dunk999
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"Aughts" is fine, but many people in America, at least, refer to the decade as the "two thousands".

10
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/dunk999
dunk999
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We just say "two thousands" when we use that, the extra "es" isn't used. That would be like Homer saying "Flanderses"

4
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AurosHarman

That still suffers with respect to ambiguity and relative length. "Aughts" is an elegant solution for pronouncing '00s.

5
3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AskarBazar
AskarBazar
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How do you say 191ns? " tens?"

0
1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AskarBazar
AskarBazar
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Could say "twentyzeros"

0
1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/yimantuwingyai
yimantuwingyai
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I've heard it but I predict most people will just say "turn of the millennium" to refer to that period in the future.

3
Reply4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AurosHarman

Too many syllables. And "the aughts" seems to be pretty ubiquitous: http://www.mediaite.com/online/the-aughts-a-decade-of-huh/

3
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/andrewduo
andrewduo
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Not in any English I've ever heard. Noughties (pronounced, but not spelt naughties) is the only thing I've ever heard used.

10
Reply4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AurosHarman

Here it is in the New Yorker, which identifies it as actually the most commonly used term (though sadly rooted in a corruption of "naught"): http://www.newyorker.com/magazine/2010/01/04/what-do-you-call-it

Arguably, a grudging agreement has been reached on calling the decade “the aughts,” but that unfortunate term is rooted in a linguistic error. The use of “aught” to mean “nothing,” “zero,” or “cipher” is a nineteenth-century corruption of the word “naught,” which actually does mean nothing, and which, as in the phrase “all for naught,” is still in current usage.

Of course, it's worth noting that this corruption first appeared in reference to years in the 1900s. Usage of "aughts" for the 2000s was initially a semi-ironic reference to the word's use in period dramas set in the 1910s and 1920s, where characters would be referring to that prior decade. "Back in aught five, mama died of the consumption."

I'm wondering if the frequent co-occurrence of "in" with "aught" might even be the source of the change. "In naught" could be mistaken for "in aught" very easily. Migration of Ns across word boundaries is quite common in English and many other European languages -- e.g. it happened with the word "orange", somewhere along its journey to English, from the Sanskrit root "naranga". http://www.vocabulary.com/articles/wordroutes/the-peculiar-journey-of-orange/

8
Reply13 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Majklo_Blic
Majklo_Blic
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And for the record: nuncle, napron and numpire.

0
Reply2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SteffanieS
SteffanieS
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I've heard 00s called aughts when we reference grades of steel wool in English. It's remote, but used.

4
Reply4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/valgal707

Yes, I've heard of "the aughts". It's just been several generations since anyone needed to refer to the first decade of a century, that's all!

4
Reply14 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/sakasiru
sakasiru
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I once heard "the naughties" for the 00's...

14
Reply4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Purince

I've heard that period referred to as the noughties. But that might be a British thing.

6
Reply4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/bdickson123

Yeah, I have never heard any of this "aught" or "naught" stuff. It's probably a UK term. If I asked a hundred people here on the West Coast of the US if they had ever heard that, I doubt a single one would say yes.

0
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AurosHarman

I live on the west coast of the US, in the SF Bay Area, and if you asked a hundred of my friends I'm fairly certain nearly every single one would recognize it. I've used it in both speech and text (email, FB, whatever) on numerous occasions, and never had anyone bat an eye at it.

From a collaborative / user-contributed source: http://www.urbandictionary.com/define.php?term=Aughts

In the news: http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/article/2010/01/01/AR2010010101196.html

In formal, lexicographer-assembled dictionaries:

http://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/aughts (see definition 3.3) http://dictionary.reference.com/browse/aughts (definition 2.2)

7
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/bdickson123

That's interesting that you have so many friends who would use that word. Everyone I know would most likely know the word, but it just sounds weird when we use it in colloquial speech.

It also might be a generational thing. The language you grew up using will inevitably be different than that I am accustomed to. We have called English the same thing for a long time and will undoubtedly continue to do so, but what it actually is is always changing, like how the water going over Niagara Falls is always different, but the landmark is the same.

English is a very malleable language, and sometimes two people in the same area can have completely different interpretations and habits of usage. I can accept this as a minor nuance that is really not important in the long run, but is still fun to discuss.

By the way, good sources, especially the Washington Post article. In addition to providing an example of usage for "aught," it was very interesting.

I suggest that y'all check it out. It's a good read.

5
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/skepticalways

Nice come-back, bdickson and thanks auros, for the time you took to source your commentary. I enjoy seeing word use & origin discussions. I had heard the term "aughts," although it was even before my father's time.

1
2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/irene121212

I am English born and bred still living in London and never heard anyone saying "aught". They say "nineteen o seven ".

4
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Fake_Name

I use "the two thousands", but sometimes people think I'm referring to the century or the milennium...

2
Reply4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/dansmisterdans

A guess: "los años ceros"

0
Reply1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Brahaspatinda

Please can those of us who lost out with poor guesswork have a translation here??

11
Reply5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Shafica

I had a hard time with this, too. Son (they are) de (from) los (the) años cincuenta (50 years). I gave it a wild guess and lucked out.

13
Reply4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/xiape

cincuentas is an adjective, so it's a type of year. I just translated it literally as was done above, and made a guess that the type of year they wanted was the fifties.

6
Reply4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/PatrickJoh3

Thanks Shafica,you helped out

1
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Danlewis1a

How do they get "they are from the fifties " from this?

8
Reply5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/raskolnik

"Son de" is obvious, I'd think, and "los años x" are how you say "the xs." So the nineties would be "los años noventa," etc.

12
Reply5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/sakasiru
sakasiru
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How would I say "they are in their fifties" (= over fifty years old)?

7
Reply4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/PerroNegro

I thought maybe you had to use "tener", but when I searched it on SpanishDict I got the following translations: "son en sus años cincuenta" and, oddly, "Llegar a los cincuenta".

10
Reply4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/sakasiru
sakasiru
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Thank you!

1
Reply4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/rogercchristie
rogercchristie
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I got something similar: Ellos están en sus cincuenta años

1
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/andrewduo
andrewduo
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Could this be "sound of the fifties"? (Like a compilation album).

5
Reply5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/RockinAbs

Why is 'you are from the fifties' marked wrong?

3
Reply4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/dj63010
dj63010
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Ustedes son de los años cincuenta

2
Reply4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JackYakov
JackYakov
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what does the sentence really mean?

3
Reply4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/dj63010
dj63010
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It means they are from the 1950's. That's when they grew up and identify with those times.

5
Reply4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Perseph1955
Perseph1955
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Happy Days! Lost in the '50s tonight.

1
Reply2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MichaelPai19

I assume they are time travellers from the 50's. Which century the sentence is unclear of however.

0
Reply1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/tvoiles
tvoiles
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Why is it "los años cincuenta"? why is cincuenta singular?

3
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/krashman

Doesn't accept "They are from the 50s"

2
Reply4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Paulalock

I put that today and it was accepted.

2
Reply4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/skepticalways

It probably wanted you to spell it instead of using numerals.

0
Reply2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/boydgaryl

doesn't accept 1950s

2
Reply4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/mslinda6357

I missed the class on "they" being assumed before "are".

1
Reply4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/tanataviele

it's in one of the first basic lessons, the very first maybe? try there to review - but since you're now in level 13 I suppose you did already :-) In general you can almost always omit the pronoun with any verb, not just to be.

5
Reply4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/zombiesue

When you conjugate a verb, the verb will include the subject. So Son = they are, sdoy = I am, etc.

1
Reply4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Snoue

why not ' son desde los anos cincuenta'

1
Reply4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/pleiadian_

http://spanish.about.com/od/prepositions/a/de_vs_desde.htm

From what I understand "son desde los años cincuenta" is more of they came from the fifties as if the fifties is a physical location that they physically moved away from or that they are "since the fifties" which doesn't make much sense, or at the very least, it doesn't make as much sense as saying: "son de los años cincuenta" = 'they are (people) of the fifties'.

3
Reply4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/rogercchristie
rogercchristie
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I tried "They are of the fifties". It's "wrong"!

2
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/willbyzx

They are from the fifties. - is correct. a saying that I think we have all heard. - Twenties -thirties - forties - fifties - sixties ====etc.

1
Reply4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/KATEJ15

Oh, flip! I lost my nerve and referenced 'Ya son las once'. Will remember this one!

1
Reply4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/tonibolland

is this case an era is not a location (in time) or you would use estar ...I am confused between where to use ser and estar sometimes!

1
Reply4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/khalil3x6

The suggestions 'threw' me off. I answered:"They're from fifty years ago."

1
Reply4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Samuelbb11

Without context, how is one to know?

1
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/busycat
busycat
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Why is it not "you are from the fifties"?

1
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ElizabethJohn

They are from the fifties

1
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JohnGrunewald
JohnGrunewald
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It was asked in the long thread but not really answered: How would you say "They are in their fifties?" Meaning that their ages are somewhere between fifty and sixty."

1
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Paulalock

I would have thought "Están en sus años cincuenta" but on googling that phrase only got six hits so maybe not, or it's an unusual expression in Spanish. I don't think we have a native Spanish speaker on this thread to confirm one way or the other unfortunately.

1
Reply3 years ago