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  5. "Sie geht nie schwimmen."

"Sie geht nie schwimmen."

Translation:She never goes swimming.

May 5, 2013

88 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Vinnatan

What's the difference between "nie" and "niemals"?

June 18, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JesseSG

I've heard from another comment-er on here that they are largely interchangeable. When one says 'Ich trinke niemals Bier.' They use niemals because it flows better. It sort of makes sense. Imagine saying 'Ich trinke nie Bier' opposed to the former.

June 21, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/christian

They use niemals because it flows better.

Not really. "niemals" is more emphatic than "nie", which is more common.

August 28, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mizzoth

What's the difference between, "Sie geht nie schwimmen," and, "Sie schwimmt niemals"?

I was taught that German doesn't use a "to go + VERB" construction so translating this as, "She never goes swimming," feels like a literal translation from English rather than German grammar.

August 20, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/alivingdoll

After consulting a German... there seem to be a subtle difference between the two. The latter makes one wonder if 'she' is capable of swimming at all, while the former doesn't.

May 17, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Siebenundzwanzig

That's interesting, but wouldn't that make understand something really challenging?

She swims. She is swimming. She is going swimming.

Sie schwimmt. Sie schwimmt. Sie geht schwimmen.

Wouldn't the latter just mean the female is going TO somewhere, in order to then swim? Without that sort of translation, I can see a lot of situations being hard to understand.

April 1, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Hotz196498

the difference would be "she never goes swimming" and "she never swims." what you were taught probably refers to the lack of the continuous aspect, as in to say "she is swimming" you dont say 'sie ist schwimmen' you'd just use "sie schwimmt" she swims/she is swimming. yet you can still "go" do something and that has this equivalent in german that is just fine to say: sie geht schwimmen. does that answer?

August 3, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/not_a_thing

I think the verb here is "schwimmen gehen", similar to "spazieren gehen".

September 9, 2017

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/lidijaposlon

why'' she'' with ''schwimm en ''

July 1, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/OzrenIlic

Only first verb (gehen) changes its form. Second verb is in infinitive.

July 1, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/joshthegreat36

It's similar to how you wouldn't say "she never goes she swims" but instead "she never goes swimming" in English

September 22, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Carla744071

"she" is with "geht". Sie geht. Schwimmen is "to swim". "She goes to swim." Sie geht schwimmen. Ich gehe schwimmen. Wir gehen schwimmen.

February 19, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/liminal

Yes I thought sie was 'they' here not 'she'.. schwimmen is plural isnt it?

December 30, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/minj

In this case it's infinitive

December 30, 2013

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Siebenundzwanzig

If you see "Sie schwimmen, ..." then, yeah, it could be a plural. And if you saw, in this exercise, this: "Sie gehen nie(mals) schwimmen." then it would also be "you are", or "they are".

April 1, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/rehamalassily

schwimmen for " Sie" /she
why not Schwimmt ?

May 3, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/fehrerdef

For the same reason why it is not "she goes swims" in English. "schwimmen" is an infinitive (like "to swim" in English).

February 12, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Alicia.phan

Only first verb (gehen) changes its form. Second verb is in infinitive.

February 12, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Carla744071

Sie geht... Verb after doesn't matter. She goes to swim, we go to swim. "To go" is the conjugated verb. "To swim" stays as it is.

February 19, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AseemKumar

+1

May 14, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MoAl2

cause geht was conjucated, the second verb (comes at the end) is always in it's infinative form, you'll see this usually in verbs like "ich kann urlaub gehen" you don't say geht, regardles of the subject.

August 9, 2014

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SirLingualot

I did some research and, hopefully, this information will make its way into T&N for the current unit (if this exercise does not get moved to a more appropriate place in the "tree" altogether).

As one poster pointed out here, the construction of the sentence actually involves "schwimmen gehen" as if it were one verb (there is a nice write-up about this at http://www.dartmouth.edu/~deutsch/Grammatik/WordOrder/WordOrder.html, or http://www.dartmouth.edu/~deutsch/Grammatik/WordOrder/WordOrder1.html if you want a rather more structured explanation -- both pages cover complements as well as sentence word order and lots of other interesting things). But "schwimmen" here is used as a gerund, which is a verb that is magically transformed into a noun by whatever mechanism a language uses to create gerunds. In German, apparently, gerunds seem to be formed by using the infinitive of the verb.

So in the case of "schwimmen," the verb becomes a gerund, essentially a noun which is actually a verbal complement in this case. It tells us what sort of thing we are "going" for; in this case, swimming. (Note that there are other sorts of predicate complements, and that this is just one sort of verbal complement.)

I did a lot of footwork to figure this out, visiting half a dozen pages, and along with the knowledge I've gathered previously, was able to piece this together. I hope this is (1) correct (if not, please make a statement of why it is wrong and I promise to correct it), and (2) useful to other Duolinguists.

May 26, 2018

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Carla744071

It pretty much means "She goes to swim".

February 19, 2019

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/G.VENKATARAMAN

Than u,danke

May 28, 2018

[deactivated user]

    That makes perfect sense. Thank you. English never uses the infinitive to make a gerund. I think that might be where some of the confusion arises here.

    January 26, 2019

    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/FredNicolas4

    I dont understand this. If is the singular, why Duo uses Schwimmen?

    November 28, 2014

    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/twiztedfate

    because you can't have two conjugated verbs together like that. You already have geht which is a conjugated form of gehen. Therefore schwimmen doesn't get conjugated it stays in it's infinitive form.

    November 28, 2014

    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/andrecsq

    Why "She is never going to swim." is wrong?

    May 7, 2013

    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Aonshix

    Because geht is "to go" in the present tense, not the future.

    May 20, 2013

    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/agentpatsy

    What about "She is never going swimming."? That could be either present or near future but got marked wrong.

    June 10, 2013

    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/username9009

    "She is never going swimming," seems a little awkward to me, and it means about the same as "She is never going to swim," as in, at no point in the future will she swim. "She never swims," on the other hand, means that swimming is something she doesn't do, but it's possible (perhaps unlikely) that she will in the future.

    September 28, 2013

    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/apetruska

    Why is "She will never go swimming" not correct?

    October 15, 2014

    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/twiztedfate

    Will is the verb "Werden" . I believe you would say "Sie wird nie schwimmen gehen" if you wanted to say "She will never go swimming". "she never goes swimming" means at the present time she doesn't, but to say "She will never go swimming" that makes it a future sentence. you are saying she will never in the future go swimming. Hope this helps

    October 15, 2014

    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/apetruska

    I see, thanks!

    October 16, 2014

    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/CappyMcBrit

    I almost translated this as: she walks, never swims.

    Would that be better written as: "Sie geht aber nie schwimmen?"

    November 29, 2014

    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/zeke525

    How come "Sie" (capitalized) does not mean 'you'?

    May 17, 2015

    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/serinabinu

    Check the verb following it. If it was you then it will be Sie gehen. Capitalised Sie is you but a sentence starting with Sie can be either You or she because of the fact that all sentence starts with capital letters. Hence the verb gives the clue to the gender in this case

    June 29, 2015

    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Carla744071

    Because it's "Sie geht", and looking at "geht" we can tell it is third person singular.

    February 19, 2019

    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ErdnaGoogle

    In english, is there a difference between "she goes swimming" and "she is going to swim"?

    August 12, 2018

    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Carla744071

    Yes, but it is small. With no other context, "She goes swimming" probably means swimming is an activity she does often. "She is going to swim" probably means she has plans to swim, or is currently on her way to the swimming pool.

    February 19, 2019

    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/fehrerdef

    "she goes swimming" is present tense and uses "to go" as the main verb, telling that she moves (goes) in order to swim, e.g. by going to a public pool or a river.
    In "she is going to swim" the verb "to go" is used as an auxiliary to form the "near future tense". So there is no "going" in the meaning, but the sentence is nearly equivalent to "She will swim".

    February 19, 2019

    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/eshan943679

    Shouldn't 'nie' be at the end since it is negating 'geht'

    December 17, 2018

    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Hotz196498

    no... secondary infinitive verbs take precedence to go at the end of the sentence... gehen is conjugated at position 2, schwimmen goes at the end. plus nie is an adverb that doesnt follow the same rules as nicht

    December 17, 2018

    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/fehrerdef

    Well, in fact "nicht" is an adverb as well and would take the same position in this sentence "Ich gehe nicht schwimmen".
    The rule is that infinitives and participles go to the very end of sentences, even after "nicht" and similar words.

    January 19, 2019

    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/OzrenIlic

    When do we use "zu" before second verb (infinitive)?

    May 5, 2013

    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/yashkochar

    Is "she never goes for swimming" incorrect? Why?

    March 9, 2014

    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Carla744071

    "for" does not belong. Schwimmen is "to swim" or "swimming".

    February 19, 2019

    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Siebenundzwanzig

    The "for" doesn't belong, although why that is the case, I couldn't explain. It might work in some obscure context, but in this case, it certainly doesn't. "She never goes swimming for her friends." would work, but that's not what this exercise is wanting.

    April 1, 2014

    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Alvishy

    I wrote "never", and had it wrong. But when I press the "nie" word, which I know to mean means never, it says "never". But my translation was still considered wrong, and I was told it should mean "not"...

    December 1, 2014

    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/twiztedfate

    what was the exact answer you put? because the translation is "She never goes swimming". Did you word it another way? or have a spelling mistake? because it definitely means never, it wouldn't mean not.

    December 2, 2014

    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MartinaDzim

    Pfft... stupid

    March 16, 2016

    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/lllEwoklll

    i want to ask, why is never or "nie" after "gehen'? can anyone clearify?

    January 24, 2017

    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Pronkman666

    Why is it schwimmen and not schwimmt

    March 25, 2018

    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/harytomi

    Nie = niemals

    December 25, 2018

    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/OutCider

    Why now it's not correct "she never go to swim"?

    February 6, 2019

    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/fehrerdef

    you cannot use "go" for a 3rd person singular (he/she/it), you need "goes"

    February 6, 2019

    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/OutCider

    How do I know here that SIE is SHE and not THEY...

    February 6, 2019

    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/fehrerdef

    from the verb form. If "sie" is plural it can't be "geht" but "gehen".

    February 6, 2019

    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/30Minutes2

    Is it normal for when you click on the button it says you're wrong before you can actually answer?

    July 3, 2019

    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SarahClark409739

    If nie and niemals are interchangeable, how do we know which the question is asking for?

    July 18, 2019

    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/fehrerdef

    It doesn't matter. Both are accepted. But I'd prefer "nie", "niemals" sounds a little more declamatory.

    July 18, 2019

    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/GregoryEva8

    Ah I finally get it now. 'Nie' is coming after the verb in this sentence as 'geht' is the key word here with 'schwimmen' being in its infinitive form.

    September 3, 2019

    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/fehrerdef

    Still not the complete story. That it comes after the verb is by chance. There could be lots of things in between.
    The rule is that adverbs like "nie", "nicht" go to the end of the sentence, but still before any infinitives, participles and second parts of split verbs (and maybe some adverbial determinations).
    When there are no objects or other other adverbials they end up after the verb, but this is only a coincidence.

    As an example, take e.g.
    "Sie geht in den Sommermonaten, wenn sie sowieso Ferien hat, ├╝blicherweise nie schwimmen.
    ("In the months of summer, when she is on vacation anyway; she usually never goes swimming".
    (verb and "nie" marked bold, the infinitive in italics)

    September 3, 2019

    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Ali.M2

    Can we say: " Sie geht schwimmen nie? "

    October 7, 2019

    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/fehrerdef

    No, that's not a possible word order. Participles and infinitives go behind adverbials like "nie" or "nicht".

    October 7, 2019

    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DibyenduBi

    "Schwimmen" is used for plural form, then why here it is used for "she"?

    November 22, 2019

    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/fehrerdef

    It is not a plural form here, it is the infinitive ("to swim").

    November 27, 2019

    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Shantanu_nandy

    She doesn't go to swim - i got it incorrect... Anyone can explain?

    December 8, 2019

    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/andreita2388

    ok, nie and niemals mean the same, but we have to use them in order they have sense in a sentece

    August 27, 2013

    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/bugraaydin1

    She never goes to swimming. This is counted as wrong, why?

    March 5, 2014

    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Aonshix

    Because in English, we go "to" nouns, not verbs. If it were Swimming Practice that would be fine, but it's incorrect (although a super common error to make) to say "go to [verb]".

    March 5, 2014

    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/bugraaydin1

    "swimming" is a noun. verbal noun/gerund. in case you don't know that.

    March 6, 2014

    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/OgnjenG.

    Yes, but u don't use preposition "to" with gerund... http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gerund#Examples_of_use Also in some cases, usage of gerund and form "to+infinitive" may really differ, like for example Stop smoking! Stop to smoke.

    October 31, 2014

    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SirLingualot

    Each language follows its own rules for forming gerunds, just like nearly every other part of speech. In English, we (usually) add +ing to the verb stem: Swim -> swimming. In German, (from what I know), we use the infinitive: schwimmen -> schwimmen (there is no transformation).

    The wiki page you cite is for English (and maybe some other languages) only.

    May 26, 2018

    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Aonshix

    Thanks :D, always nice to learn something about your mother tongue. Treating them like verbs'll still probably work in this case though.

    March 7, 2014

    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/bugraaydin1

    as u said, swimming is a verb in that case and i found a link that saying it "doesn't" <even if i knew that surely. > :P. By the way, native English speakers are the most starving ones in grammer over the word. :P i am certainly not the judge here. :)

    March 7, 2014

    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/bluesharkgeek

    Lol i said shwiven and it said i was right

    February 28, 2016

    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MarcTF

    Why is it schwimmen and not schwimmt?

    May 1, 2017

    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Teresinha

    That "w" in "schwimmen sounds like "u" or "v"? I cannot distinguish.

    August 22, 2013

    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/nateVONgreat

    yes, sometimes "w" sounds like "V" and sometimes "U", I suggest listening to radio/tv/movies/etc' to get a good idea of all german pronunciation and talking.

    November 15, 2013

    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Teresinha

    Thanks, nate!

    November 17, 2013

    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Shadee1

    it's "v"

    October 20, 2013

    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Teresinha

    Oh thank you!

    October 21, 2013

    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/CaptainOwl

    I am not native english speaker, could "she does never go swimming" be right ? Danke

    August 28, 2013

    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mfelix

    No, this sounds awkward.

    September 22, 2013

    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/minj

    'She does not ever go swimming' would be correct English.

    Does is only used with negations/questions or when additional emphasis is in order: 'She does go swimming'.

    I don't think I've ever heard anyone use such emphasis with 'never' though. So you better not do that.

    November 13, 2013

    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Siebenundzwanzig

    I think, in that sort of example, it's more common to use the contracted form: doesn't

    I remember once using an none-contracted form of doesn't, and I got some weird looks and comments. xD "You're posh aren't you." or something. Yes, that's what "it is" in England! If you speak properly, you're automatically posh! So forget grammar, speak like yoda and you'll do very well, socially. :P

    April 1, 2014

    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ELIH123456

    hi

    September 29, 2015
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