"De directeur wil koffie met melk."

Translation:The director wants coffee with milk.

4 years ago

20 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/hetechocomel

Moet het niet "wilt" zijn, aangezien het hier om de derde persoon gaat?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MathLing
MathLing
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4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/amuzulo
amuzulo
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I just looked at dict.cc and saw that directors can be either directeuren or directeurs. Are they interchangeable or is one more common than the other?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/hetechocomel

I never heard anyone say directeurs, directeuren is the common form.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/fhitlord
fhitlord
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I gots me a question for conjunctions here, honestly. Which would be correct: "De directeur wil koffie met melk als suiker" or, "De directeur wil koffie met melk en suiker"?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/El2theK
El2theK
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The latter, with the first one you are saying he wants coffee with milk as sugar.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/FritzGraven

Kan je niet slechts zeggen "De directeur wil een latte."?

1 year ago

[deactivated user]

    Have you received a reply to this? According to the Memrise app "latte" is "koffie met melk" in Dutch.

    9 months ago

    https://www.duolingo.com/FritzGraven

    Thanks! My thoughts exactly. Why use many words when one word will do.

    9 months ago

    https://www.duolingo.com/olyakorikosha

    Why 'wil' not 'wilt' referring to a third person?

    9 months ago

    https://www.duolingo.com/El2theK
    El2theK
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    Third person singular for willen = wil

    9 months ago

    https://www.duolingo.com/Amir_Khosravi

    and "The director wants latte" is not correct ha? :/

    4 weeks ago

    https://www.duolingo.com/DavidLamb3
    DavidLamb3
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    I haven't tried this, but could this be translated, "The director wants white coffee"? Before people started using the word "latte" for coffee with milk in the UK, it was always "white coffee". Coffee without milk was "black coffee".

    8 months ago

    https://www.duolingo.com/El2theK
    El2theK
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    Not every coffee with milk is a latte or a white coffee etc.: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_coffee_drinks#With_milk

    Before you ask, it is very unlikely that all these types of coffee that contain milk will be added.

    8 months ago

    https://www.duolingo.com/DavidLamb3
    DavidLamb3
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    But the very source you gave the link to includes the following: "White coffee (UK) 'White coffee' is the British alternative to a 'black coffee;' it is any form of black coffee with fresh cold milk added. Sometimes, hot milk (boiled or not) is used instead of cold."

    So here in the UK at least, "white coffee" does indeed mean any coffee with milk, hence my question.

    I don't know about latte. (A sign of my advancing age, perhaps?)

    8 months ago

    https://www.duolingo.com/El2theK
    El2theK
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    Sure white cofee is coffee with milk. So is, latte, latte machiato, cappuccino, café au lait, flat white, Galão, Cortado etc..

    Hence, as I said, not every coffee with milk is a white coffee. Let's not complicate things with all the different types of coffee that can be created by adding milk.

    8 months ago

    https://www.duolingo.com/DavidLamb3
    DavidLamb3
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    Sorry, I think you missed the point of what I was saying. Yes, there are other terms apart from "white coffee" which can be used for coffee with milk. I certainly wasn't trying to "complicate things with all the different types of coffee that can be created by adding milk." My point was that all coffee which is described as "white coffee" is some kind of coffee with milk, and my original question concerned whether "white coffee" was an acceptable translation of the Dutch "koffie met melk". Apologies for any misunderstanding.

    8 months ago

    https://www.duolingo.com/FritzGraven

    White coffee can also mean coffee roasted with palm oil margarine.

    8 months ago

    https://www.duolingo.com/DavidLamb3
    DavidLamb3
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    It may for all I know be used a a technical term for such coffee. A quick Google search tells me that this is called "Ipoh white coffee". If I went into a cafe and asked for a white coffee, I really don't think the waiter or waitress would bring me coffee roasted with palm oil margarine! I maintain that the phrase "white coffee" used in everyday British English, means coffee with milk, or possibly cream.

    8 months ago

    https://www.duolingo.com/sofia451451
    sofia451451
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    David Lamb, I understand you. And it is not correct to say coffee with milk but white coffee. Im agree with you

    6 months ago
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