"Losutilizanparamostrarlonegativo."

Translation:They use them to show the negative.

5 years ago

29 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/tylerlucas13

Put simply, "lo" is used before an adjective to mean roughly "the [adjective] thing." This is simply a common construction in Spanish. So if you ever see "lo grande" it's "the big thing." And "lo extraño" is "the strange thing."

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AZ_Dude
AZ_Dude
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That makes sense, thank you

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/crucker1980

Thank you very much

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/elizadeux
elizadeux
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In this case, I think "lo negativo" could be translated as the negative part.

6 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Steve402004

Then this should have transated to "the negative thing"?

5 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/damalojo

What's the function of "lo" and when is it used? If I had been translating from English to Spanish, my first thought would have bee "el negativo."

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Zikosi
Zikosi
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Lo is used as a direct object pronoun for masculine nouns and for cases where the gender is irrelevant/unknown. La is for feminine nouns.

'Él lo quiere' = 'He wants it'

'Lo' is used in this case because 'negativo' is actually an adjective, and when you use adjectives without nouns you have to have a pronoun.

'Lo peor ha pasado' = 'The worst has happened.

The only time you can use 'el [adjective]' is if there is a noun following this. The noun can however be implied, as in,

'Vivo en el tercero [piso]' = 'I live on the third [floor]'

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Robth

Very interesting. Thanks. One thing, would you use "tercer" even if you were only implying "piso", or tercero as you have done.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/azizspanish

The same question as damalojo! Why is it 'lo negativo' and not 'el negativo' or would both be correct?

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/percyflage

Putting "lo" in front changes the word from an abstract adjective to a noun. That's my understanding. "Una cosa negativa" becomes "lo negativo" = "the negative".

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/anneliseped

demonstrate and show are synonyms in this case and should both be accepted

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/catepoe
catepoe
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Why not "they are used" as well as "they use them"?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/circumbendibus
circumbendibus
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I think passive voice is usually expressed with the use of reflexive pronouns. I don't remember all the grammar details, but "se utilizan" would be the key phrase to look for for Duo.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Shortsy

I would never have guessed this

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Rents
Rents
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I guessed this, but I was sure that it's somehow wrong. It is a really weird construction.

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Talca
Talca
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How weird? Very weird.

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/learnTACO32

Why the LO? The explanations below are too vague foe me. Anyone elso out there with an answer

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/BarbaraMorris
BarbaraMorris
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From what I understand of Zikosi's explanation, "negativo" is an adjective, so the Spanish isn't saying "the negative", it's saying something like "showing it [to be] negative", where the "lo" is the "it".

Edit, weeks? later: Ok, I was wrong here. It is saying "the negative".

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Talca
Talca
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From Barrons Spanish Grammar by Christopher Kendris (2001). The Neutral Article LO Lo has idiomatic uses. It is used with a masculine singular form of an adjective used as a noun. Examples lo bueno (the good), lo malo (the bad), lo interesante (what)ever is interesting,

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/henry.s

Could "you use" and "they use" both be used here? Or is "Ustedes" never implicit like "ellos"/"ellas" can be?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/BarbaraMorris
BarbaraMorris
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Yes, they could both be used. "Ustedes" can be implicit. This article is useful: http://spanish.about.com/od/pronouns/a/subject_pronoun.htm

Usually duolingo allows any English pronoun that fits the verb form.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Lihi898543

Since it's then why not use 'los' instead lo

7 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/BarbaraMorris
BarbaraMorris
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The "lo" applies to "negativo", singular. (Adding "lo" to an adjective turns the adjective into a noun.)

7 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Drake254147

What can't Duolingo construct sentences which actually make sense and may prove useful...?

6 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/billmoose
billmoose
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This one works in Photography if discussing a light box. But, yes, the more absurd the better to keep us thinking about sentence structure. "Cats against turtles" for example. There are websites dedicated to that kind of thing.

6 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ChrisDavie19

But doesnt this approach negate the point of duolingo learning approach of learning a useful language simply through repetition. We are given no teaching on sentence structures.

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JesseCanno2

Makes no sense in English

2 weeks ago

https://www.duolingo.com/neal.matulich

Dafuq is this!

4 years ago
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