"Nederland heeft veel stranden."

Translation:The Netherlands has many beaches.

4 years ago

46 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/EkjSieStoltheit

I move that we englishers start calling it Nederland instead of The Netherlands

"This is my friend Piet. He's from Nederland."

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jameschatepa

I wrote the Netherlands has lots of beaches. it's less formal, but sure it's correct as well?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Albert_Morris

I don't have a problem with your suggestion. It's possible the people at Duolingo just didn't think of it as a possible translation. Did you report it as an answer that should be accepted?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Ehsan_Mehmed
Ehsan_Mehmed
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"lots of" for something uncountable i think

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/skyjo77
skyjo77
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Could one write the following: “The Netherlands have many beaches“? Because, a pluralia tantum is of course only in the plural.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Schengis
Schengis
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No, simply due to common usage. In this case, you'd have to use The Netherlands as a single entity, just as you would The Philippines, for example. It also sounds like subjunctive if you say it like that.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/skyjo77
skyjo77
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Thank you very much!

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Schengis
Schengis
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Is there a reason why Holland doesn't work in place of the Netherlands?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/johaquila
johaquila
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Yes. Holland makes up 13 % of the area of the Netherlands and has 37 % of its population. That's a lot, but not enough to make the two interchangeable. Although in this sentence it's actually more correct than in general, since Holland has most of the coastline (depending on how you measure this).

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DanyellWal1

I had no clue!! Thank you. <3

9 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Darren_Islar
Darren_Islar
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I need to say that as native, I never looked at the word "Holland" as only belonging to the provinces with "Holland" in their name. To me it is interchangeable with "Nederland", and no ... I don't live in Noord- or Zuid Holland ;)

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AdamNowek
AdamNowek
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There are only two provinces called Holland in the Netherlands.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/marcuslangford

I would still report it since other questions accept Holland in place of "the Netherlands" (which I disagree with for the reasons given by the other commentors)

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Alex_Kinsey
Alex_Kinsey
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Right or wrong, Holland is commonly used in English to refer to the whole of the Netherlands, so it ought to be accepted. That being said, I prefer to use the Netherlands

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/zach_dooley

I wrote, Netherlands has many beaches. Why is The needed in english?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ofred19
ofred19
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it's just a country that takes an article in English, like "The Papal States" or "The United States". Much like in German "die Schweiz"; it's just something you have to do.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MisterTipp
MisterTipp
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Why are you asking Switzerland to kill itself? Wtf

3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/johaquila
johaquila
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See the terminology discussion of the Wikipedia article on the Low Countries. Also, it's a normal definite article, not a capitalised one. There isn't even a dispute about this among pedants, unlike the case of "[t/T]he Beatles".

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Albert_Morris

The word "nether" means something like lower or below, but is not used very much any more. You need to use an article for places names which include common nouns, and as "Netherlands" means "low countries", this rule applies.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Alex_Kinsey
Alex_Kinsey
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Generally speaking names of countries in English take the definite article if they are plural e.g. The Netherlands and the Philippines (note that its acceptable to use the third person singular of the verb with these) or if the name of the country includes a union or institution of some kind e.g. The United Kingdom, the Czech Republic. The United States is an example of both. Exceptions like the Ukraine are gradually falling out of use. I still prefer to say the Ukraine, but I hear a lot of people say just Ukraine.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AdamNowek
AdamNowek
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It is not "the Ukraine," regardless of what you prefer. The definite article is offensive because it refers to the country's past as a colonised land.

See: http://www.rferl.org/content/Ukraine_Vs_The_Ukraine/1865351.html http://www.businessinsider.com/the-ukraine-2012-6?IR=T

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Alex_Kinsey
Alex_Kinsey
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Ok, I didn't know that. Thanks for the link. I won't use the definite article with it anymore.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SeanMeaneyPL
SeanMeaneyPL
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I don't think you can reasonably expect everyone to understand the politics or history of every state. I'm happy to have an explanation, but your response was a little curt, if you don't mind my saying so, and might have been better received if delivered less sharply. Some feminists call male midwives "midhusbands". Am I going to criticise them for their lack of understanding of etymology? No, but I would, politely, make the point that it is not a justifiable construction in my view. "The Ukraine" is justifiable historically and by habit. I understand that you regard the definite article as designating colonial status, but I'm not convinced. I need more evidence. Even if your contention is correct, you cannot expect everyone to hold the same view. It is essentially political, not linguistic. Please do not misunderstand this as support for Russian domination of the Ukraine. Nothing could be further from the truth. I come from a country that has had more than enough domination from a larger neighbour over the centuries, but I can still accept "Ulster" as an inaccurate description of "Northern Ireland". Most English people would regard Holland and the Netherlands as being synonymous. In a world where insult is perceived everywhere, let me say that no insult is intended.

7 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Dzhocef
Dzhocef
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So if it was only called "Netherland" it wouldn't need the article?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/acastilloflores
acastilloflores
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I bet it wouldn't: See, Holland, Iceland, New Zeland, Poland....

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/marcuslangford

True, but I would hardly call "nether" a common noun.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/acastilloflores
acastilloflores
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We use THE for every country which it's name take a plural form, as far as I can see: the Netherlands, the United States, the Emirate Arab States, the Cook Islands, the Bahamas....

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/peachtree2

(Feel free to remove this if this is already a raging discussion elsewhere, but) Why does Netherlands have to be plural when England is okay being singular? England used to be Angles and Saxons and multiple kingdoms and managed to unify into one land. Why can't Netherland do the same (in English {it already did in Dutch}, or at least be an acceptable alternative within this duolingo)? There was enough struggle for that unity and independence, declare it!

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/johaquila
johaquila
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The nether lands / low countries are much, much younger than the land of the Angles. The following information is from Wikipedia:

  • The term low countries arose at the court of the Dukes of Burgundy, who had to distinguish the two disconnected parts of their possessions: the low countries by the sea and the lands in and near the Alps. That would put it around 1400. So the term is about 600 years old.
  • The earliest documented use of Angle land(s) was around 900. (It seems to have resulted from abbreviating the term Anglo-Saxon lands, since it appears that the Saxons were in all respects much more important than the Angles.) So the term is about 1100 years old.

Just give it a bit more time. Maybe next year.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/twhelan
twhelan
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Why is it "the Netherlands has" not "the Netherlands have"?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/johaquila
johaquila
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It's a borderline case because "the Netherlands" isn't really several countries but just one. Just like there is a complex issue of grammatical gender vs. natural gender in Dutch, there is also the issue of grammatical number vs. natural number in both languages. It's similar for rock groups, football teams etc., with differences between American and British English as to how they are handled.

What all these phenomena have in common: One can't be completely wrong since it's at least acceptable either way. And it's tricky to get it completely right in all cases without learning separately for each word and each context how it's handled.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/NCThom
NCThom
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"The United States is a member of NATO, as is the Netherlands. The United Kingdom is also a member, as is France." Each of these is an individual state, so they each are singular, even if the names of some of them represent plural concepts (states, lands).

Even more fun, "Trinidad and Tobago are neighboring islands. Trinidad and Tobago is not a member of NATO." (The former refers to the two pieces of land each surrounded by water; the latter to the republic (that encompasses the two islands).)

3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/TanteTami
TanteTami
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Why "veel" and not "vele"? "stranden" is plural!

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/johaquila
johaquila
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Veel is not an adjective. Maybe the erosion of inflections happened faster for quantifiers.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/TanteTami
TanteTami
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All right. But there is still something I don't understand. What is right? I learned the saying "Vele handen maken licht werk" (and not "Veel handen maken licht werk" - so which one is right? And if "vele handen" is right, why isn't "vele stranden"?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/johaquila
johaquila
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It's explained at http://taaladvies.net/taal/advies/vraag/1339/ . Apparently, both forms are correct, with veel being the neutral form and vele more formal or stressed. This makes sense under the assumption that vele is the earlier form and veel the more progressive one. Proverbs are slower to change, so "Vele handen maken licht werk" is still the standard formulation.

The source also describes a difference of meaning between veel and vele that corresponds to the different uses of viel (singular) and viele (plural) in German.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/TanteTami
TanteTami
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Thank you, that really helps!

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MentalPinball
MentalPinball
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Hi, johaquila,

Would you mind sharing the url? The link doesn't seem to work for those of us who use the app (or, at least, it doesn't work for me...).

Thanks!

3 weeks ago

https://www.duolingo.com/johaquila
johaquila
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I have changed the link to a bare URL. But this is really a bug that Duolingo staff should fix. Have you reported it?

3 weeks ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MentalPinball
MentalPinball
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Thanks, Johaquila, that's very kind of you. :)

Honestly, I haven't reported it. I'm actually unsure of how to report it.... I mean, it's not a problem with the exercise itself, but with the app. I know that to report it I should include a screenshot....

Something that I also find extremely annoying is that, when using the desktop version, I don't get notifications anymore when someone replies to one of my comments, and I never got any notifications on the app. So... I have to get on the PC, open Thunderbird, check each notification I got there to see if there's anything I'd like to comment on, and only then open the browser and log into Duolingo.... Oh, well.... it's not as if we'd get a hernia out of it, right? It is nevertheless annoying having to take so many unnecessary steps.

3 weeks ago

https://www.duolingo.com/johaquila
johaquila
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We are talking about a bug report for Duolingo's software developers, not a problem report on course content. Submitting a bug report is described at https://support.duolingo.com/hc/en-us/articles/204728264-How-do-I-report-a-bug- . That page links to https://support.duolingo.com/hc/en-us/requests/new as the location where you can actually file a bug. As a software developer myself, I can tell you that screenshots are often useless and it's typically a good description that matters. E.g.:

In forum posts, users can use markup to create links. This works well when working on a computer. However, I am using version [version number of your Duolingo app] of Duolingo's smartphone app for version [version number] of [Android/OS X/whatever] on a [model of your smartphone].

Expected behaviour: In forum posts that include a link, it should be possible to open the page linked to in a browser by clicking the link. If this is too difficult to implement, links should be displayed as the original markup with square brackets enclosing the link title and parentheses enclosing the URL, so that we can manually copy the URL to a browser.

Actual behaviour: [choose the one that applies]

  • Links look like ordinary text, are not clickable, and there is no way to see or use the URL.
  • Links are recognisable by blue text but are not clickable. There is no way to see or use the URL.

I cannot file this bug report for you because I only use Duolingo on computers and so do not have the information that I left out above.

3 weeks ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Raslc
Raslc
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They are just like the beaches in The Caribbean.

With the tiny difference of completely everything.

Maar ze zijn mooi :) op hun eigen manier

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Anna945625
Anna945625
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Why is it wrong to write “The netherlands has GOT veel stranden“? I learnt to use has/have with got afterwards...

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/BenYoung84
BenYoung84
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If you wrote "many beaches" instead of "veel stranden" then that should be accepted.

11 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/HannesDr.M

Only correct: the Netherlands have many beaches. Why do you use this mixture?

6 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/johaquila
johaquila
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English often uses natural number rather than grammatical number. E.g., (with certain differences between American and British English) pop groups or football teams may be treated either as singulars or plurals depending on whether one thinks of the individuals or the entire group - regardless of whether the name is grammatically a singular, a plural or not recognisable as either.

Also, in this particular case, since the adjective nether has fallen out of use and modern English speakers are not aware that the Netherlands used to consist of several countries, they no longer analyse "the Netherlands" as "the nether lands". To them, the name is just a weird anomaly.

According to a quick experiment I did on Google's n-gram viewer, "the Netherlands" is treated as a singular approximately 60% of the time in English books. (No difference between British and American books.)

Dutch has a similar phenomenon with gender instead of number: Whereas German uses grammatical gender most of the time and English always uses natural gender, Dutch is currently changing. Flemish still uses primarily grammatical gender, and northern Dutch uses primarily natural gender. No doubt Dutch dialects are in various intermediate stages.

6 months ago
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