"El jugo tiene sabor a naranja."

Translation:The juice tastes like orange.

5 years ago

74 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/oletuv

"The juice has a taste of orange" was marked down. What is wrong with this?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/wynrich
wynrichPlus
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I agree. I said "The juice has the taste of orange." It seems if "the flavor" is accepted, then "the taste" should be accepted.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jennesy
jennesy
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I agree!

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Melarish
MelarishPlus
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Reported 19/07/15

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AurosHarman

I agree it should be accepted.

If I were going to translate the English sentence, "The juice tastes like orange," I would use, "El jugo sabe a naranja."

See the last segment of this page: http://spanish.about.com/od/usingparticularverbs/a/saber.htm

Apparently the etymological connection between knowledge or discernment, and things having a particular flavor, goes back to Latin: http://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/sapio#Latin

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/marianne.w4

I said. .The juice has an orange taste ...was accepted

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/bal7774

Where is "the" flavor?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/dholman
dholman
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If that's in response to me, I'm talking about the English. When talking about a specific drink (as opposed to for example, one of a range), we talk about The flavour of it, not A flavour of it.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Alano0
Alano0
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I agree. Taste is more common usage in English

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/dholman
dholman
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I would say "the taste of orange" or "the flavour of orange" should be OK, but I wouldn't agree with "a taste of orange". I think "the" is needed, as it is "the" flavour of the drink.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Melarish
MelarishPlus
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"a taste of" usually means it doesn't entirely taste of the same thing, but has a little bit of it. So it would work as well, just a different meaning.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Dan_dos
Dan_dos
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I have the same frickin' question. This translator frustrates me to no end!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MannyOD
MannyOD
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Why "a naranja" and not "de naranja"?

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/adamyoung97
adamyoung97
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I think it's because food/drink of a flavour has it to that flavour... or at least it does in French:

  • La tarte à la fraise = Strawberry pie
  • La glace au citron = Lemon ice cream

However, while in French you need the article as well (le/la) in Spanish you just need a:

  • Jugo a naranja
5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/PERCE_NEIGE
PERCE_NEIGE
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But why on the bottles I buy I can see: "Zumo de naranja"? http://es.wikipedia.org/wiki/Zumo_de_naranja

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/EmmaMitche89062

Yes, orange juice (Spain).

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Tengo_una_alma

Zumo is in Spain. Jugo is Latin American.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ashi97

I am not sure about that thing since you should say Jugo de naranja - this is the correct way to say it.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MannyOD
MannyOD
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Gracias!

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/mikaelf

I would say zumo de naranja for orange juice. Wouldn't often speak of a juice having flavor of a fruit.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Melita2

In North Am, if it isn't 100% juice, it can't be called juice. It is called "drink" or "cocktail", perhaps with x% of juice. Otherwise, it is una bebida que sabe a naranja o a manzana, pero no es un jugo / zumo.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/wmfay
wmfay
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I think this is one of the set things in Spanish. See the list on http://www.elearnspanishlanguage.com/grammar/verb/verbswithprep-a2.html for a list of verbs using "a" before an object.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Kirsten637255

Interestingly, that link is referring to using the verb "saber," not the noun "sabor." "Saber" means to know/taste. According to website, when you use "saber a," it means to taste like. But this sentence used the noun "sabor," which means flavor or taste. Maybe you still use the "a" even when using "sabor," even though it is a different word.

In any event, I would have said this sentence as" El jugo sabe a naranja."

9 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/blue.skies

Gracias, esto es perfecto.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/sjmkeogh

"jugo" is zumo in Madrid, Espana.

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/msobke
msobke
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You are correct, but Duolingo Spanish is not Spanish of Spain, but rather meant to be a kind of hybrid of different South American versions (if I remember correctly from an earlier lesson where somebody reconned this).

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/PERCE_NEIGE
PERCE_NEIGE
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It should accept all the spanish words :-(

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Tengo_una_alma

No.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AurosHarman

It already has a mix of several different dialects, I don't see why it should reject Castellano. Personally, my most extensive practice talking to native speakers has been with madrileños.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/BryceSpringfield
BryceSpringfield
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Because more people speak Latin American Spanish. It would be cool if they had options to solve that problem for people who want to learn the Spain dialect

5 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/PERCE_NEIGE
PERCE_NEIGE
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Why not?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/edmond.Ballerin

I agree

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/craig.zar210

the juice has flavor of orange.....

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/paayzer

Orangey? Never heard that impression. Neither I have heard someone saying: The juice has appley taste... Can you really say like that in English?

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ckoschil
ckoschil
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I think "orangey" is colloquial, just as you would use a dimunitive phrase in Spanish. I agree, this translation is a stretch and I would have expected something more formal, like "The juice tastes like orange"

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/PERCE_NEIGE
PERCE_NEIGE
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They fixed it, the correct translations are now: Correct solutions: • The juice tastes of orange. • The juice tastes like orange.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/biftacular

I think you meant to say "expression" not "impression" And I agree, "Orangey" is not a word you hear very often in english.

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Charley-Farley

you can definitely say 'it tastes orangey' - the same as 'cheesy', 'oniony' 'appley' - anything. Not sure what the dictionary would say - but used a lot in English. Have you never heard of 'cheesy chips'?!

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AurosHarman

-y is a highly productive suffix in English, and is particularly popular for describing flavors.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/learner48

I'm wondering why we don't say 'sabor de naranja' instead of a naranja?

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JimHazlitt

The juice has an orange flavour is accepted. Note - the English/Australian spelling of flavour is accepted by DL.

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Melita2

Canadians too spell it flavour :-)

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Charley-Farley

Good old Canadians!!

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Spanielle2

Strange, the word 'flavoured' got marked as wrong in my answer, with 'flavored' showing up in the "correct" answer. A bit annoying! Reported it anyway....

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/llanaraymaker

'flavoured' (UK spelling) was not accepted for me...how strange!

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/VinayakGar7

Can sabor be used to say something like - orange tastes good?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/RosieStrawberry

Jugo = Zumo in Spain!!! I tried jugo, but nobody understood me....

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ceaer
ceaer
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It's been updated to accept "The juice has an orange taste"

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Talca
Talca
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The juice tastes orange. Wonder if DL accepts that...

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Charley-Farley

That sounds more like the colour. The juice tastes blue!

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Talca
Talca
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Orange is not only a color--it is also a flavor.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Daniel-in-BC

"The juice is orange flavored." was accepted. (29 Jan 2014)

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Objectivist
Objectivist
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That's what I wrote. Someone correct me if I'm wrong, but I believe you can't use 'orange' as an adverb, thus making the above sentence incorrect?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Filjan
Filjan
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It is an adjective here.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/joe814027

Quit trying to change spanish into how you feel it should work. Spanish is spanish it is what it is.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Amodia
Amodia
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I like the taste of green personally :P (Joke)

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AurosHarman

I don't think you can use "verde" to translate the English word "greens" (as in collard greens, mustard greens, etc). Those are types of "verdaduras" (which can also mean vegetables in general). So "verde" does not have a flavor. "Naranja", on the other hand, as a noun can be both the color and the fruit.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Amodia
Amodia
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Thank you for answering :) I was trying to make a joke on the fact that Naranja means the fruit and color. But seeing how this is a place for language I guess it can be hard for people to recognize it as a joke instead of a mistake :P

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/PERCE_NEIGE
PERCE_NEIGE
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The juice has a taste of orange, is it correct?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Lxstimpson

The juice tastes like an orange should be accepted since the article an makes orange a noun and not an adjective - isn't that what Duolingo says for it's spanish articles?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jbriz13

Can someone explain why it wouldn't be "El jugo tiene sabor COMO naranja"?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Justin885116
Justin885116
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porque no lo es

el jugo tiene sabor DE naranja

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/12pinkrose

I put "the juice tastes like an orange". WHAT IS WRONG with that? Does anyone know???

11 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Beto330368

So it's wrong if you give the flavor the definite article, and it's wrong if you give it an indefinite article? Too bad it isn't written in Greek, that way you could give it a neutral article! This is maddening!

10 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jaques743588

"The juice tastes like oranges". or "...tastes like orange juice". that is what this native English speaker would say

5 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/arturohiero

The translation is incorrect: "The juice tastes like orange" is an impossible sentence in English, since "orange" is use as adjective. Possible correct alternatives are: tastes like orange juice, tastes of oranges, has the taste of an orange.

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/culluc

Now please... '' tastes like orange'' is perfectly acceptable. ''You should try this lubricant, it tastes like strawberry'' ...lol ...is just another example...

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/PERCE_NEIGE
PERCE_NEIGE
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https://www.duolingo.com/Talca
Talca
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I respect your concise undertanding of English, but in conversational English: The juice tastes orange. is perfectly understandable and better than the approved translation The juice tastes like orange. I am more interested in the preposición A used here in the Spanish sentence. I can`t say that I have seen that form used in this way before.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/BenLyle

I think arturohiero is correct. You wouldn't say "It tastes like orange" because that would sound like the color. You would probably say, "It tastes like oranges," pluralizing it to avoid confusion. "mmm. . .tastes like oranges!" You can say "Tastes like strawberry" because there's no confusion with the noun strawberry. Interesting English quirk that I'd never noticed before.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Talca
Talca
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Orange is a flavor as well as a color. I say: It takes like wine. It takes like rum. It takes like watermelon. It tastes like garlic. It takes like orange. Duolingo's answer means it is not orange, but it tastes like orange. In other words, it has a citrus flavor, but not orange.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/BenLyle

It's weird, isn't it? But after a Google search, I can't find one instance of "tastes like orange", but many of "tastes like oranges". Here's one: http://gizmodo.com/5825909/orange-juice-is-artificially-flavored-to-taste-like-oranges.

It's a strange thing, but I think the oranges, plural, helps us know we are not talking about the color but the fruit, a problem that, for instance, watermelon doesn't have. If you can find an instance where "tastes like orange" is used in the sense that you mean it, post it here. I haven't done an exhaustive search, by any means!

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Talca
Talca
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Here is the solution. Blindfold a friend and hand him some food and say, "What does this taste like?" When he tastes the quince, he'll say, "It tastes like lemon." But it is not a lemon, it is a quince.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/dejota333

I agree with arturohiero too. I've never heard anyone say that something tastes “like orange," "like strawberry," “like lemon,” or even “tastes orange/strawberry/lemon.” All sound very unnatural and ungrammatical. In these examples, “orange,” “strawberry,” and “lemon” are nouns, not adjectives. Single nouns need an article, the indefinite article in this case, before them. So you can say that it tastes like “an orange,” “a strawberry,” or “a lemon.” When the nouns are plural, they cannot take an indefinite article, so you would say that it tastes like “oranges,” “strawberries,” or “lemons,” but you cannot say that it tastes like “orange/strawberry/lemon”. If you want “orange” or “lemon” to function as an adjective, you have to add a “-y,” making it “orangey” or “lemony.” I’m don’t believe there is a way for “strawberry” to become one, outside of it being used as a noun adjunct, which is the only other way that they can become adjectives as in “orange juice,” “lemon bar”, “strawberry jam” where they describe the nouns “juice,” “bar,” and “jam” respectively.

5 months ago
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