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What is the best way to use duoLingo?

I am a second-generation Salvadoran-American. Wistfully, I never truly clasped an understanding of the Spanish language as I grew up. I remember learning in High School that the majority of third-generation Latino-Americans know little to no Spanish. A substantial measure of the reason for this statistic is established due to Second-generation Latino-Americans failing to fully grasp a firm understanding of the language for one reason or another. I do not want to contribute to this statistic. In my second semester of college (Spring 2012), I decided to take a Spanish class and genuinely apply myself in the course. When I received my Associates degree in May of last year, I had completed three courses in Spanish. Although I had received an A in all three courses, I had not learned as much of the language as I felt I should have. The material was thrown at me at an uncontrollable rate. I found myself cramming vocabulary words into my head the night before quizzes and tests, just to forget the information as hastily as I had learned it. DuoLingo was recommended to me by a co-worker several months ago, during the intersession between the Fall 2013 and Spring 2014 semester. I am able to control the learning pace, learn at whatever time works best for me, and do not have to worry about any of the pressure associated with maintaining a respectable GPA. This makes learning Spanish kind of fun, and much easier than any college course that I have ever taken. However, I am beginning to wonder if I am using duoLingo properly. I've been consistently going over past lessons to keep them fully strengthened (5/5 gold). Using duoLingo this way has allowed me to remember all of the accumulating vernacular. However, it is seemingly taking forever for me to complete my tree. I've heard from some other members of the duoLingo community that the strategy they use is to pay little attention to the strength of past lessons as they culminate their tree, then go back and relearn forgotten material. In seven months I have managed to assemble 60.2% of my tree. Part of the reason for this taking so long is that I gave up on using duoLingo during the last semester (January-May). Between my girlfriend, job, and rigorous school work, I did not have enough time for duoLingo. I ended up forgetting a lot of what I had learned before the semester and had to relearn it. The next semester is rapidly approaching. I will be sure to stay on top of my duoLingo game during this next semester, but I will most likely be progressing at a snail's pace as I try to juggle keeping a job, girlfriend, and high GPA with learning a language. At first I thought that my strategy would really help me get a good grasp of the Spanish language by keeping all the vocabulary and grammar fresh in my head. Now I am not sure if I am learning better or if I am just learning slower. I am hoping that some other members of the duoLingo community could shed some light on what they think is the best way to learn a new language using the benefits of duoLingo. So feel free to reply telling me how you use the app. Hopefully we can all help each other and develop the best way to capitalize from the perks of this software.

4 years ago

2 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/tu.8zPhLD72zzoZN
tu.8zPhLD72zzoZN
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I like to spend time each day learning something new, reviewing and checking discussions in the language I am trying to learn. I do not try to make everything golden each day, because the fastest way to do that would be the timed strengthen skills. I use that also but it is a very superficial review. When you are far enough along, you may find it beneficial to learn the opposite tree as well: English from Spanish, because you will get to read all the discussions the people are having about English in Spanish. I learn other languages which gives me the opportunity to cross-learn. Since I am fairly fluent in French, I can learn Spanish from French and French from Spanish is a second review + all that valuable discussion from native Spanish speakers trying to learn French. Really, it is important to spend time in immersion though. You can do a search of the discussions for "Spanish films", "Spanish books" and "Spanish sites". These are just some of the sites I use that I discovered through discussions of lessons or the main discussions.

http://dictionary.reverso.net/english-spanish http://spanish.about.com/od/prepositions/a/preposition_de.htm http://www.newsinslowspanish.com/latino/

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WlknUGwKHtw

http://lyricstranslate.com/en/el-carretero-wagon-man.html http://www.scribd.com/doc/187656333/Spanish-Study-Guide-v-18-7-9-14

http://www.spaleon.com/

http://www.bbc.co.uk/mundo/ http://spanishdimension.com/downloads/ijlikh4345milih5345/free_spanish_course.html http://menuaingles.blogspot.com/2009/01/diferencia-entre-to-meet-y-to-know.html https://www.duolingo.com/comment/1473533

https://www.duolingo.com/comment/3580945

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Rob2042

You are trying to do too much. If I were you I would focus on the job, girlfriend and GPA. After graduation I would then take up Spanish and devote the hours each day necessary to learn it.

4 years ago