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"Ella tiene buen oído."

Translation:She has a good ear.

5 years ago

33 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/AndreasWitnstein
AndreasWitnstein
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A better translation is “She has good hearing.”

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jonbriden

Agreed. Reported 21 May 2014.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MarekBajt
MarekBajt
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Still not acceptable.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/sneuberg

Not accepted 11 Aug 2014

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/danielinform

"She has good hearing" is now accepted. :-)

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Lisagnipura

Andreas: Yes, definitely, better! "She has good hearing".

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/nueby
nueby
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She has good hearing must have cost a whole lot of hearts. Still rejected on 5 October 2014, "corrected" to She has good ears.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AdrienneOrlando

I was wondering if that would be accepted; apparently it was flagged in 2014.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/rogercchristie
rogercchristie
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As explained down the page, "She has a good ear" is the correct translation and it is accepted by DL.
"She has good hearing" would be "Ella tiene buen audición" .

It would be clearer if the sentence was something like "She has a good ear for music" - "Ella tiene buen oído para la música" , or "She has a good ear for Spanish" - "Ella tiene buen oído para el español" .

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SraDPhx
SraDPhx
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http://www.wordreference.com/es/en/translation.asp?spen=o%C3%ADdo

"UN buen oído" = A good ear

"buen oído" = good hearing

C'mon!

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/alezzzix
alezzzix
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Not everything has to be literal, remember that Spanish does not distinguish between a/an and one, so to say that somebody has "un buen oído" might be implying that there is something wrong with their other ear.

  • Un buen oído = One good ear
1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JudieElisabeth

Good hearing is a much better translation. DL needs to be more consistant regarding whether to translate something literally or translate the meaning as in natural speaking.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/phemsworth

She has a good ear in English has a different meaning than she has good hearing. She has a good ear has more to do with the ability to distinguish pitch and tone and not the simple ability to hear. This is the limitation of learning this way; the translations are not natural and sometimes not accurate. I still get annoyed when I write "be able" for poder and the translation accepted is "can".

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/mccomish
mccomish
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Hi again Phemsworth - I wouldn't get caught up too much with these minor glitches because the algorithms cannot detect these nuances - I think any native speaker will very quickly recognise the difference. Considering it's free, it's not a problem. I paid hundreds of pounds learning with Rosetta stone and nothing sunk in because it was basically a giant "pointing at pictures" quiz. I can honestly say that this course has given me an excellent grounding in Spanish - my only problem being that it cannot possibly prepare you for the Andalusian accent - nice though it is. Hence I can say more than I can understand when people speak to me. For example a waiter here, instead of saying "Le gustan las tapas" they dispense with the "s"s and say "Le gu'tan la tapa" and Whisky is "wiki" - takes a bit of getting used to.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Jeffrey855877
Jeffrey855877
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Yes and yes.

"Good ear" is a term of art familiar to musicians concerning the ability to accurately hear (and learn) pitches, tones, chord progressions - it's particular apt for jam sessions (jazz, country fiddling, whatever). It's also apt for people who are good at learning languages.

And Duolingo is definitely better than Rosetta Stone, which you still have to pay close to $200 USD for - although that's for 2 years on-line.

Now: Does having (a) good ear mean the same thing in Spanish?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/phemsworth

You are right! It is free and there are a lot of pluses. By the way, if you get used to people dropping "s" s, you'll be fine in the Caribbean. I have had 2 Cuban teachers (at Instituto de Cervantes here in NY) and they all drop their "s"s and people from the Dominican Republic and Puerto Rico do the same! Good luck to you!!

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/mccomish
mccomish
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You too - the world suddenly becomes a brighter place when we make the effort to speak each other's languages.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Adriano732737

Also here in Murcia, Spain "s" s are dropped, so "dos" becomes "Doh" and "doce" becomes "doth", so is 2 or 12 centimos required? i have also noticed that "ouw" somehow replaces "ado" with some past participles as in pasado "pasouw"

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/EmmaMitche89062

I didn't know about that, cheers. I have been to Murcia twice, but it was just before I started learning Spanish. Go figure (I'm a Brit, but this expression fits).

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SLL3
SLL3
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Does this imply that the other ear is bad? Could this also mean she has a good ear for music?

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AndreasWitnstein
AndreasWitnstein
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No. Yes.

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/dcrand
dcrand
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why no indefinite article?

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AndreasWitnstein
AndreasWitnstein
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In English, we use either the metaphorical expression “She has a good ear.”, with an indefinite article; or the literal expression “She has good hearing.”, without an article. The Spanish word for “hearing” is ‘oído’, and ‘Ella tiene buen oído’ is used without an article, just as in English. Spanish also has a separate word for “ear”, ‘oreja’, but that only refers to the “pinna”, or outer ear, so it doesn't make for a good metaphor of “hearing”. The Spanish word ‘oído’ is also used for the organ of hearing.

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/dcrand
dcrand
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In English we achieve the same effect by using the plural: she has good ears. Rarely taken to mean that she has good earlobes! And the original question is of course long gone but I do not recall any hint giving "hearing" as a translation.

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AdrienneOrlando

¡Exactamente qué yo pensaba!

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/mccomish
mccomish
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Still not accepted. 5th Aug 14. Is there a reason this has not been accepted. Is there another, more accurate translation for "good hearing"?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AndreasWitnstein
AndreasWitnstein
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What's still not accepted?

Another common translation for “good hearing” is ‘buena audición’.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jjcthorpe

she has a GREAT ear is not accepted either....?? i reported it.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/zeeuw

Even free language courses need to be accurate. To date, March 2017, "she has a good hearing" is not accepted as correct.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/rogercchristie
rogercchristie
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Probably because it is wrong. Please read the other comments.

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/HarpoChico

So careful what you say when she's in earshot...

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SeanPatric908907

"She hears well" was not accepted.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/RobertKinzie

DL told me I was wrong cuz "You used the singular "ear" here, instead of the plural "ears". " wassup?

10 months ago