Duolingo is the most popular way to learn languages in the world. Best of all, it's 100% free!

"Él se fue con su mochila al hombro."

Translation:He left with his bag on his shoulder.

0
5 years ago

29 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/Shortsy

Seriously? "he went with his backpack on his shoulder" is not correct??? I'm pulling the little bit of hair left on my head...

5
Reply5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/tmichal2

Good question. "Ir" has the specific meaning of going somewhere, whereas "irse" generally denotes leaving a place. "Él se fue" has the meaning of "he left" while "Él fue" has the meaning of "he went." I hope this helps. A subtle difference, albeit an important one!

29
Reply45 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/cdntinpusher

It helps greatly! Thanks.

1
Reply5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/junevilleco

I thought irse meant "to go away", which was marked wrong...

0
Reply4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/neiht20
neiht20
  • 15
  • 9
  • 6
  • 5

It can mean "to go away" but as in "to leave".

0
Reply4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/CMcV1
CMcV1
  • 16
  • 7
  • 7
  • 3
  • 2

In a present tense it is. "Go away" and "leave" have almost the same meaning.

But this is a past tense so you can say "left" or "went away"

0
Reply4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jjcthorpe

"me voy" normally is thought of as "I'm leaving/I'm going" as opposed to "I'm going AWAY" so I think any variation on that means "leaving" instead of going "away" ie me fui = I left, se fue = he/she left"

0
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/shemp
shemp
  • 25
  • 25
  • 22
  • 12

Duo accepts this translation now.

1
Reply4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Charley-Farley

And I put 'he went with his rucksack on his shoulder' and just waited to lose my last heart, as previously it wouldn't accept rucksack - and yay! Accepted!

0
Reply4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/la.cortadora

Accepted 5/18/2014

0
Reply4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Wonderboy6
Wonderboy6
  • 25
  • 17
  • 15
  • 13

why the preposition 'a'?

2
Reply4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/nvielot
nvielot
  • 15
  • 10
  • 3

Why won't they accept "went away"? This is what irse means, same meaning as "to leave".

1
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/elizadeux
elizadeux
  • 18
  • 16
  • 15
  • 6
  • 6

Report it.

0
Reply1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/WodgerWabbit

Is "He left with HER backpack on HIS shoulder" technically wrong?

1
Reply4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MattShanah4

Good question. Anybody?

0
Reply2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/PansyPurple
PansyPurple
  • 16
  • 14
  • 11
  • 11
  • 10
  • 9

"He went off with his rucksack ..." not accepted. Any thoughts please?

1
Reply3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/elizadeux
elizadeux
  • 18
  • 16
  • 15
  • 6
  • 6

You could try reporting it.

0
Reply1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/rowanash

mochila al hombro can just be translated as 'backpack' right?

0
Reply4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Fluent2B

Mochila all by itself can mean backpack.

1
Reply4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/cdntinpusher

Also, "espalda" is "back" though, interestingly, I inadvertantly found that (and I am not sure how correct Google Translate is) "shoulderS" plural is translated as "espalda". Maybe because if you have something on both shoulders, it is really on your back?

0
Reply4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/elizadeux
elizadeux
  • 18
  • 16
  • 15
  • 6
  • 6

backpack (or rucksack) on his shoulder would be fine.

0
Reply1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Lrtward
Lrtward
Mod
  • 25
  • 25
  • 8
  • 8
  • 660

FYI I put knapsack for mochila and was counted wrong, but I reported it.

0
Reply4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MaxE.Burgess

He left with his backpack over his shoulder. Was wrong. That's just crap.

0
Reply4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/PERCE_NEIGE
PERCE_NEIGE
  • 22
  • 19
  • 13
  • 9
  • 9
  • 6
  • 6
  • 5
  • 4
  • 4
  • 3
  • 2
  • 2
  • 2
  • 2
  • 2
  • 2
  • 2
  • 2

I know it's a little redundant, but I put "he went with his shoulder bag at the shoulder", because they gave "shoulder bag" = mochila, in the hints. What's wrong?

0
Reply4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/elizadeux
elizadeux
  • 18
  • 16
  • 15
  • 6
  • 6

Él se fue = he left but él fue = he went, so that's probably the biggest issue.

Mochila usually means backpack (or rucksack) in my experience. Apparently, it can also translate to shoulder bag or book bag in the UK.

0
Reply1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/norma330

mochila = backpack, ie. pack. What's wrong with pack in this sense?

0
Reply4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jjcthorpe

isn't mochila = backpack, bolsa = bag ( ie handbag/purse or a bag (of groceries)? Would mochila normally be translated as just a "bag"?

0
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/carlos970483

I put He went out with a backpack on his sholder and still got it wrong

0
Reply2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/elizadeux
elizadeux
  • 18
  • 16
  • 15
  • 6
  • 6

Went out = salir

0
Reply1 month ago