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"Finalmente la puerta se ha abierto."

Translation:Finally the door has opened.

0
5 years ago

48 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/thepkl

I do not understand the 'se' here

22
Reply5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/k3nd0
k3nd0
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It's reflexive. Who opened the door? The door has opened itself. It sounds silly but "se" is used when the implied direct object is the same as the subject. If "Ella" had opened the door you wouldn't need it.

50
Reply55 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/davidrosa.tt

question.... then does this literally mean finally the door has opened itself

3
Reply4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/k3nd0
k3nd0
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Not literally no. Linguismo gives a better response in stating that "se" is used for the passive construction.

22
Reply4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/rogercchristie
rogercchristie
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We should note that (as dougconnah said) the passive voice would be "The door has been opened", and DL accepts this version .

5
Reply11 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ChrisWhatever

That's what I said and it was rejected (2 Jan 2017)

0
1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/s_helmer

Thanks, hope I can remember this rule in the future.

3
Reply4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Wyatt386954

Would you still use "se" if you had context in a paragraph, or does it only pertain to the sentence?

0
Reply4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Linguismo

Also, the 'se' creates the passive construction- the se replaces the agent when it is unknown or unncessary

32
Reply25 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/dougconnah

Yes. My "The door has finally been opened" was accepted.

4
Reply4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Bonifaciu
Bonifaciu
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My "Finally the door has been opened." was accepted too.

1
Reply2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/david.godfrey

I'm not sure I understand that. What do you mean?

1
Reply4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/John__Doe
John__Doe
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I believe Linguismo means se here indicates passive voice, the door has been opened. by who? we don't know, thus the se for the unknown who

7
Reply4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jmiker54
jmiker54
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It is not reflexive it is passsive voice. A reflexive action is one the is done to oneself by oneself. The action starts and ends with the same person. A sentence in passive voice is an action that is done by some unknown force or we are not told how the action took place. Se is always placed in front of the verb never attached to the infinitive, and always used in the third person singular, so no te's or me's. whereas reflexive uses me, te, nos, os and se.

28
Reply83 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JGarrick62

It's the passive se. If it helps you can think of it as '<some unnamed thing> has opened the door." This may explain it better:

http://www.spanishdict.com/topics/show/87

12
Reply24 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/philippe.e

At last the door has opened is also correct

4
Reply5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DeanG6
DeanG6
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'Finally' seems a better translation for 'finalmente' than any of the alternatives. Why not just use it?

3
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/gernt
gernt
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Why better? Because the derive from the same root? "At last" carries the meaning at least as well.

2
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DeanG6
DeanG6
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Yes because they come from the same root. It's a simpler, cleaner, perhaps most literal translation with the least chance of a personal bias changing the meaning. And because it's easier to work with DL by choosing the most obvious translation rather than struggling to teach the Owl alternate ones. But that's just me. To each his own. Cada loco con su tema. ;)

6
Reply13 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Shirlgirl007
Shirlgirl007
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I agree, there is enough to remember without striving for other alternatives, plus I like to think of it as staving off Alzheimer's, keep it clean and clear up there.

2
Reply6 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/t8rn8r
t8rn8r
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Thank you!

1
Reply2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Pigslew
Pigslew
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But not accepted, Philippe.e, as so often.

0
Reply4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/gernt
gernt
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Still not accepted as of Halloween 2014.

0
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/rogercchristie
rogercchristie
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So would "Finally he has opened the door" be "Finalmente, ha abierto la puerta"?

3
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AndreasWitnstein
AndreasWitnstein
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Yes, or “she” or “you [formal singular]”.

2
Reply2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jmiker54
jmiker54
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I think it looks good.

1
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/gernt
gernt
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If it were preceded by "Él se rindió y...". I think at least a little context is needed to supply the missing subject based on searching Linguee for "ha abierto".

0
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SanaBau
SanaBau
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The suggested translations for "se ha abierto" include "has opened up", yet this is marked as wrong. Reported.

2
Reply4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/HarpoChico

I was playing safe here so that I would not be marked wrong. But I think 'se ha abierto' has a passive meaning in this context and should be translated by 'has been opened'. Passives are rarely used in spoken Spanish and French. Usually the reflexive 'se' structure is used.

2
Reply2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/joolsbelhaven

I wrote "Finally the door has been opened" and it was accepted. I notice that the course doesn't have a section on passive verbs.

0
Reply2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/gernt
gernt
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The passive is used a lot in both languages. Se utiliza la pasiva mucho en ambos idiomas. Maybe a section could be created by some kind volunteers, he says passively.

1
Reply2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Jonfonseca

Why "abierto" and not "abierta" as in "la puerta"?

1
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/gernt
gernt
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La puerta está abierta porque la puerta se ha abierto. It's the difference between using it as a modifier and using it as a verb.

8
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jmiker54
jmiker54
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Gernt is right, you always use the past participle when forming the Present Perfect.

4
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Spanishmakeup
Spanishmakeup
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"Love is an open dooooooorrrrr!"

1
Reply2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/keyboardo

No. Please. Just let it go.

1
Reply1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/BenjaminGosling
BenjaminGosling
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What is wrong with my 'at last' instead of 'finally'?

1
Reply2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/gernt
gernt
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Nothing except that it may not yet be included in the list of accepted answers.

1
Reply1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jameslucas129
jameslucas129
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"The door has opened finally" was not accepted.

0
Reply2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Dusty325699
Dusty325699
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Nice transition for passive sentences

0
Reply2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Pato_Tonto
Pato_Tonto
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"We have but one choice; We must face the long dark of Moria..."

0
Reply2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AltheaVet

So if you DID want to say "Finally, the door opened itself" how would that be different?

0
Reply1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/heartegg

Quoted from: Anonymous immigrant getting through Trump's wall, circa 2020

0
Reply1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Ido236021

at last instead of finally? why not?

0
Reply1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/amble2lingo

"Por fin" is probably a better translation for "at last." The two phrases are roughly equivalent, but I don't know why you were tempted to use anything other than "finally" when you have a nice semi-cognate like "finalmente."

0
Reply1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/bamburm

what is wrong with "at last"?. It means the same thing in English.

0
Reply1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/blairparki

If i actually knew how grammar works then i would be able to understand when something is a verb or adjective or any of the other language nonsense that makes it so hard to make a sentence, but i don't so most of the time when someone starts to explain something and say " its a noun" basically it is just gobbledejook to me hahahaha

0
Reply5 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/rogercchristie
rogercchristie
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It is very difficult to explain how languages work without using the vocabulary of grammar. I do appreciate that that makes it difficult if you haven't done much grammar before. And Duolingo does assume we understand the basics of grammar.

I suggest you find some good grammar websites and start from the beginning --- "A verb is blah, blah, blah", "A noun is etc etc", even if you already know some of it. Even if you do already have some basic grammar it will be time well invested. And it doesn't take long to skim through the basics when you already have some knowledge (which you clearly do - even though the way we talk about it may not be familiar).

I started learning Spanish and revising my rusty old French four years ago. Even though I had studied English grammar (and Latin and French - albeit numerous years ago!), my confidence that I knew it all already was sadly misplaced. It wasn't long before I was checking my understanding and finding several large holes! And four years on, I still check the grammar websites regularly. It is a lot easier now I know my way around them.

I dare say I could recommend some good grammar websites, but I suggest you start like I did. Google "English grammar" and see what it throws up. You will soon learn how to spot the rubbish ones and build up a favourites list for the ones worth going back to. (PS: other search engines are available!)

1
Reply15 months ago