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"Did you think to buy a dozen eggs?"

Translation:Tu as pensé à acheter une douzaine d'œufs ?

April 29, 2020

25 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/scuddycat

Is someone able to explain why the à is required. Acheter is "to buy" so this seems like it's saying: to to buy. I'm always forgetting this. Perhaps understanding the reasoning would help me.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/doublelingot

You have to forget this reasoning quickly, otherwise you'll make a lot of mistakes. I translate the sentence into two steps:

  • Did you think to (think about)... Tu as pensé à/Vous avez pensé à
  • buy a dozen eggs... acheter une douzaine d'oefs.

The first step (penser à quelque chose) is essential for a better understanding (quelque chose = buying a dozen eggs). Good luck!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/IanOSullebhain

I did it without the à and marked wrong. Pourquoi.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/VeronikaNie

Why can't 'twelve eggs' be translated as 'douze oeufs', but it has to be 'une douzaine'?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/IreneUnseen

Although I am not an expert, I would think the meaning is slightly different. i.e. - a dozen eggs (une douzaine) is a set of 12 eggs all together, not meant to be separated during purchase, whereas 12 eggs (douze) would imply 12 individual eggs selected individually.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/BenkPl

Does une douzaine means exactly 12 (or does the English dozen mean about 12)? In all other cases like une dixaine, une centaine it means about that many.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Tina991719

https://www.lawlessfrench.com/vocabulary/approximate-numbers/ has a very good explanation. But I think in this situation since the item discussed is eggs (which commonly come in dozens or half-dozens) it probably means exactly twelve. In Canadian English when we say dozen, we mean exactly twelve.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/BenkPl

thanks. is "douze oeufs" rarer in actual usage than "une douzaine d'oeufs"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/roOodie

If I remember correctly, a carton contains10 eggs in France instead of 12.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MariaIramendy

Does the verb penser always go with the prep. a


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Lng52-._

Marialramendy: "penser" means to think; "penser à" is "to think about". Same for "réfléchir" (to reflect); "réfléchir à" (to mull over, to think about).


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/roOodie

Penser de is used for an opinion.

Qu’est-ce que tu penses de ce livre ? => What do you think about this book?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/GraemeSarg

And yet you used it (successfully!) in your response above, which is most definitely not an opinion!

I don't think that it should have been accepted.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/XnossisX

Would "Have you thought about buying a dozen of eggs?" also be an acceptable translation in this case?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/GraemeSarg

That's really a question for the FR→EN exercise, not for here, but I believe that would be "penser de", not "penser à".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RussellHod2

Very disconcerting for the audio to switch between the male and female voice from word to word.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Sofia551326

Weird English sentence indeed. "Did you think to buy" wtf


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/roOodie

It's a little more for the preppy class people.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/IllparlerFrench

True. Sounds weird but not grammatically wrong


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Lng52-._

Sofia551326: Yeah. Better statement would be, " Did you REMEMBER to buy...?"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/GraemeSarg

It's synonymous (IMHO).

The secondary meaning of "penser à" is to remember.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Lng52-._

Why not "As-tu" (instead of "Tu as")?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/roOodie

As-tu pensé d'acheter une douzaine d'œufs ?

Accepted.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/GraemeSarg

I don't believe that "penser de" is correct in this context.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/stupefaite

Je suis d'accord, as far as I know it would mean: what's your opinion about buying 12 eggs ?

Edit: I checked; there is no pensé d(e) in the list of acceptable answers.

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