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"Yo leo el diario norteamericano."

Translation:I read the North American newspaper.

0
5 years ago

49 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/rmcgwn

There isn't a north american newspaper. I am in Canada not referred to as a norteamericana either. I find these sentences very strange.

15
Reply4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/TilEulenspiegel

Are you new to DL? If so, you ain't seen nothin' yet when it comes to strange translations. DL is run by an American company, so the safest responses (if you don't want to lose a heart here) will be from a U.S. perspective in terms of grammar, vocabulary and common usage.

10
Reply14 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/tu.8zPhLD72zzoZN
tu.8zPhLD72zzoZN
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In the US, we also never say North American newspaper, but from our perspective we do say some things are South American. So, the tables are turned! I wonder if people in South America call both Canadians and US citizens, "norteamericanos." In the US, we just call ourselves "Americans". They probably think that is not specific enough. Although, I would think "Canadians" would be more specific.

9
Reply4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/dj63010
dj63010
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That is true, however, we would not say "I read the South American newspaper" since there is no such animal. Any way you cut it the sentence is strange.

6
Reply4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Momo442057

Haha saunds like cut the rope

0
Reply4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JGarrick62

I've found Canadians sometimes get annoyed when we from the US call ourselves Americans. Maybe we should just adopt estadounidenses from latin America.

1
Reply24 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AnotherJoan

Mexicans are also offended that we call ourselves Americans since America is a continent not just a country. In reality the US is the United States of America, not just America.

4
Reply32 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jzw112
jzw112
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"Americans" from the U.S. will leave a good impression in Mexico if they refer to themselves as "estadounidenses."

0
1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/RaidelGlez

I'm from Cuba and I also dislike that. Any time I hear them call themselves "Americans" I think that US citizen think their country is the only one that matters in the whole continent. Or even worse, they think they own the whole continent.

0
8 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/dj63010
dj63010
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Or maybe they should choose not to be so easily offended.

-2
Reply2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/minimize940314
minimize940314
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that is super arrogant

0
2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/serbioski
serbioski
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Maybe you should just learn to call your selves properly.

-5
2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/RaidelGlez

Indeed we do call both US and Canadians citizen "norteamericanos" at least in my country. And I found it acurate since both countries are in the north part of America.

1
Reply8 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Muyil
Muyil
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It's just an exercise of words.

1
Reply2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/shahrukhs

People from latin america,while referring to something from US,they use the word "norteamericano".

0
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/serbioski
serbioski
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No, we don't.

1
Reply2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/shahrukhs

Really?

1
Reply2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/RaidelGlez

"norteamericano" would include US and Canada. To refer only to the US we would say "estadounidense". At least that's how we do it in my country.

2
Reply8 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/lambisqueiro

...Y México.

-1
8 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/fedor-A-learner

strange and dumb, mexico too is in north america.

0
Reply3 weeks ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ALLintolearning3
ALLintolearning3
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Did you think this course was a Mexican version of Spanish? Then, you were wrong. There are many other Spanish speaking countries that are not in North America.

0
Reply3 weeks ago

https://www.duolingo.com/TravisH44

Native English speakers almost never refer to something as being "North American". In this sentence the paper could be from Mexico, Canada, the US, etc. It just seems so incredibly vague to say the newspaper is North American.

1
Reply5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/drepple
drepple
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I'm a native English speaking North American and I use the term frequently and I think many others do too. My guess is that the less you think in a World-wide context the less you use the term North American.

1
Reply5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SnrFuta
SnrFuta
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I agree. I'm from New Zealand and we use North American to refer to people from the US or Canada. It's mainly so that you don't offend someone by guessing the wrong nationality :)

1
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Howard
Howard
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It's what people say, and it makes as much sense as citizens of the United States calling themselves "American."

1
Reply4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/wazzie
wazzie
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It all depends how you divide up the continents. Standard in the USA is seven continents (North America, South America, Europe, Africa, Asia, Australia, and Antarctica).
While I agree that using North American to refer to people solely from the USA is wrong, calling ourselves Americans is a bit more ambiguous. After all, there is no continent named America. You can be North American or South American.. but American by itself doesn't hold much meaning.
American calling themselves American is no more self-centered than Mexicans calling themselves Mexicans (the official name of the country is The United States of Mexico). It just so happens that our country (closely) shares a name with two continents.
Hell, even Mexicans may have an issue us calling ourselves 'United State-ians' because they are also United States.
I'm really not sure what other countries want us to do. Someone is always going to be upset.

1
Reply14 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Johngt44
Johngt44
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Wazzie, all due respect man but the latter part of that is tendentious rubbish. There is no comparison with residents of one country shortening their designation to Mexicans (remember Mexican is also an adjective, the rest is not needed; cf residents of France calling themselves French tho full name is something like The Fifth Republic...) and the residents of the US appropriating a whole continent - well, actually two as you point out!

-3
Reply13 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Raguleader

If you're translating the sentence from Spanish, it's possible that the speaker just doesn't know (or care) which country the newspaper is from. If it's in English, it's a safe bet that it's at least North American.

1
Reply2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ALLintolearning3
ALLintolearning3
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Yet, we have no problem saying that something is European.

0
Reply3 weeks ago

https://www.duolingo.com/LonzCat

We here in the US do know that other countries share our continent, but they have real country names. Unfortunately all we have is "America." I like the concept of "ustadounidence" but I doubt it would ever catch on up here --- too many syllables. Our country needs a more functional name. ( I remember once hearing someone suggest we should call ourselves "United Stations." I don't think that'll ever catch on either.)

1
Reply5 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ALLintolearning3
ALLintolearning3
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The problem is that Mexico also begins that way "Estados Unidos Mexicanos" is the official name of the country in Spanish which is their language. So, technically "ustadounidense" could mean USA citizen or Mexican citizen, though in Spanish they usually mean USA.

0
Reply3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Huysan
Huysan
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New York Times

0
Reply4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/GigiKaren
GigiKaren
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What is "the" North American newspaper? Is this one I'm not aware of? Why a specific ...and, obscure paper? One somewhere in the Americas?

0
Reply4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/adelamae

Imagine they're talking about a major international newspaper that has different editions for different parts of the world. "Did you see that great story about Argentina?" "No, I didn't see it. I read the North American newspaper."

0
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Quantum.
Quantum.
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It doesn't really exist- Duolingo just wants to make sure you understand no matter what it says.

0
Reply2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/salinh1198

My answer was correct!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

0
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/200709709
200709709
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why "the" is needed here? unlike "i like chinese food" translated from "me gusta LA comida china"?

0
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/sjr07271989

From comments, and DL sentences, and Google Translate, I've been given this impression:

-->"estadounidense" = means "person from USA" -->"american" (in English) = frequently means "origin from USA" -->"americano" = literal translation of "american," but in south american populations, "american" / "americano" should refer to all people in N. or S. America. -->"norteamericano" = a substitution for the English equivalent of "American" to distinguish from "americano" -->Thus, "norteamericano" = typically refers to "origin from USA" and may be interchangeable with "estadounidense" -->"norteamericano" may even be preferred over "estadounidense" because it is easier to pronounce. -->So, although "norteamericano" literally means "north American" (Canadian, USA origin, Mexican), it's actual use is often in reference to "USA origin"

Is this accurate?

0
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MikaelaP5

Is it wrong to capitalize the "n"

0
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/wazzie
wazzie
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It is. Only names of countries and cities are capitalized in Spanish.

Additional Resource

1
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/WyltonTheWhyte

surely 'A' North American Newspaper would be more appropriate? I hear they have quite a few.

0
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Muyil
Muyil
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My oh my

0
Reply2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ChrissyPackard

..why wouldn't there be a ... de.. in front of norteamerican?

0
Reply2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JeffAnders694718

Why not: "I read the North American Daily."

0
Reply9 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/alexandra630279

En realidad he aprendido muy bien el español lo entiendo y escribo bien si lograste leerlo perfectamente felicidades

0
Reply5 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/sapf05
sapf05
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SHORT QUESTION: Is there only just this one newspaper in the North American area? Or is it just a good example of duolingo's miserable quality? No cost - no worth!

-1
Reply6 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/goldastarr

I thought the name of the newspaper was The Daily North American. That does make sense as a name. Don't be silly.

-4
Reply4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/tu.8zPhLD72zzoZN
tu.8zPhLD72zzoZN
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If it was the actual name of the newspaper, wouldn't it have been capitalized?

0
Reply4 years ago