1. Forum
  2. >
  3. Topic: Scottish Gaelic
  4. >
  5. "My daughter is well behaved."

"My daughter is well behaved."

Translation:Tha an nighean agam modhail.

May 2, 2020

13 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Agatha631151

Why not : mo nighean?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SerraK90

I belive "mo nighean" refers to a romantic relationship ("my lass") rather than daughter.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Darkmagess

Yeah it bothers me that daughter sounds like a possession.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Alasdair723757

What is wrong with "mo nighean"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Dorothy146333

Me too, Duo accepts mo for father and brother, is it just the feminine relations?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ian15167

I'm puzzled, too. Why not 'mo nhighean'?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MargaretBo781581

Why is modhail sometimes mhodhail is it the male/female thing ?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/phoenix7777777

All I could find so far was 'modhail' for behaved and 'mì-mhodhail' for naughty... which would mean that adding 'mi-' causes the lenition?

modh (“good manners, breeding, civility, courtesy”) +‎ -ail


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SrGI2aed

Yes, mì- causes lenition, and is similar to negative prefixes like "mis-", "dis-" in English. As the stressed syllable of a Gaelic word is usually the first syllable, the hyphen is used to show that the stress stays on the first syllable of mhodhail rather than on


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/TrevorStri5

Why is it an nighean rather than just nighean I wonder? Can't see anything in the tips about that


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Cait_Sraa

I'm guessing it is because of "MY daughter", so you'll have to consider the "agam" as well here. In Gaelic, when you'd like to indicate that something "belongs" to you, you follow this pattern: "an ... agam". As we've seen in previous lessons, the same goes with "my husband" for example: Tha an duine agam ann an Afraga a Deas.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Darkmagess

But it doesn't apply to son. A daughter you own and a son you don't, seemingly.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Cait_Sraa

oh, I see. thank you! I didn't know that it doesn't apply to all nouns.

Learn Scottish Gaelic in just 5 minutes a day. For free.