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  5. "Mo ghlùn ghoirt."

"Mo ghlùn ghoirt."

Translation:My sore knee.

May 4, 2020

7 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DavidGress2

The word "ghlùn" in the audio here sounds like "chorùn". Is this a mistake or just a dialectical difference? (It would help if the home area of the speakers who are recorded the audio files were recorded.)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/silmeth

Sounds very typically, as /ɣɫuːn/, to me. Maybe you hear two syllables because of careful pronunciation (the /ɣɫ-/ part in the beginning is quite long in the recording), but I definitely don’t hear any /r/ there, and the consonant at the beginning, as I hear it, is the voiced /ɣ/ (gh), not voiceless /x/ (ch).


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/TroyLatta

I heard voiceless, actually. But it's been a while since I did this module and forgot a lot of the vocab, so I guess at chulunn, because that's what it sounded like. No idea if that word exists, though.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JohnPMChappell

Definitely agreed. I do hear a brief schwa between gh- and -lùn, but otherwise the qualities are as you describe. For others reading; when you come across something that sounds strange to you, but others, or native speakers, confirm it is proper, this is a clue that you need to "get your ear in". As in, spend time listening to Gaelic and matching what you hear to what is written, and vice versa.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Ethelflead

Knee is lenited because of the 'mo', but why is 'goirt' lenited?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/silmeth

Because it directly attributes the knee, and glùn knee is a feminine noun.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Ethelflead

Tapadh leat gu mòr. I really should've remembered that. I didn't have a thinking head on yesterday eudan bois :)

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