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"Je vais emballer les biscuits avec ce papier."

Translation:I'm going to wrap the cookies with this paper.

May 4, 2020

9 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Mike904263

Just for the record, in the UK ones says 'wrap in' not 'wrap with'.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Tantwo

That's more common in Canada too. So should the translation be "Je vais emballer les biscuits dans ce papier"? Or would the French use "avec ce papier"? Does anyone know?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Mike904263

Or even wrap up.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/GraemeSarg

Both are good. I would say "in paper" or "with this/that paper", "but in this paper" works too.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Shannon337947

"J'emballerai..." = "I will wrap..." "Je vais emballer..." = "I am going to wrap..." Your suggested answer is not a direct translation.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ClareKwan

again, I'm and I am are the same, correct?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/effyleven

Yes, Clare, "I am" and "I'm" do have the same meaning. The apostrophe is there to indicate the missing letter.

Note: Duo is very keen on the use of contractions like these, and invariably uses them in its English, doing so even when a native English speaker would not.

This may be true because it is a French course.

In French, the use of contractions (example: l'hôtel) is considered a graceful speaking style, one that flows smoothly. Therefore, using contractions -(wherever possible!)- has become the more formal kind of French language.... even when it is written down.

The opposite is true of English.

While we use contractions in speech all the time, and at all levels of society, we do not write them down unless deliberately indicating an INFORMAL pattern of speech... being "friendly," say.

So, in using so many English contractions as it does, it may be that Duolingo is applying French conventions of expression to the English translations .. and is doing so even when not really appropriate.

This is the conclusion I have come to. If I'm right (!) and I think I am, it is not the only thing Duolingo gets wrong with the English of this course.

Don't get me wrong! Duo is great, and this course is amongst the best. But it does have its "characteristics," shall we say?

I hope this was helpful. :-)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ClareKwan

For a non-native-English speaker, I feel Duolingo brings confusion. I appreciate your taking the time to explain this to me. Merci beaucoup et bonne journée


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/TimODonnel7

Also just for non-native English- speakers, the UK English translation for "biscuits" is biscuits " ; cookies are advertisements on the Internet or sometimes especially big biscuits.

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