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"Ik luister graag naar de vogels."

Translation:I like listening to the birds.

4 years ago

15 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/chinmayhej
chinmayhej
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What does "naar" do here?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/WarmFoothills

The same as to in English.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ajpthree
ajpthree
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does the "like" always come after the verb that is liked, as in this sentence?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/WarmFoothills

It can be placed there, but you can usually also place it behind the noun. Ik eet rijst graag. Btw, if you say 'Ik eet rijst graag met kip.' it means that if you get rice, you prefer to eat it with chicken. 'Ik eet graag rijst met kip.' it means that you like the dish rice with chicken.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DogePamyuPamyu

Could it be "Ik luister naar de vogels graag" like gern can go at the end in German?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Nierls
Nierls
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No.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/melo300

But graag ist translated with like to, what does the second to here?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/debrucenator

In the English translation, you're confusing the infinitive marker 'to' (which only precedes a VERB) with the preposition 'to' (which only precedes a NOUN).

Ik luister graag (literally "I listen gladly") = I like listening = I like to listen

In English "like to" is only associated with a verb, not a noun:

When you say, "I like to listen" in English, 'to' is the infinitive marker of the verb. You're not saying, "I like to the birds," you're saying "I like to listen" = "I like listening."

What do you like listening to? = What do you like to listen to?

to the birds = naar de vogels

Here, 'to' is the preposition which precedes a noun in English; just like the preposition 'naar' precedes the noun in Dutch.

Ik luister graag naar de vogels.

(literally "I listen gladly to the birds"), which translates as:

I like to listen to the birds.

or

I like listening to the birds.


Ik speel graag gitaar.

(literally: I play guitar gladly), which translates as:

I like to play guitar.

or

I like playing guitar.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/LuminJordan

I listen to the birds with pleasure

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DimitrieAn

"I listen with pleasure to the birds" is a bit literal, but still ok, no? I start to want to hoard my hearts in this section...

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MartinLexeq
MartinLexeq
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How can we know when to use "aan" or "naar" as "to"? (1. "Ik lees een boek aan haar voor." 2. "Ik luister graag naar de vogels.") Thanks.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/WarmFoothills

It's pretty much random. If you think about it, why would it be "to" in English? It's just as random. You'll will find this in any language, the only thing you can do is just remember it for the next time I'm afraid.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/debrucenator

'aan' is usually used with nouns which could also serve as the indirect object.

you can say either:

Ik lees haar een boek voor. I am reading her a book. / I am reading a book to her.

or:

Ik lees een boek aan haar voor. I am reading a book to her. / I am reading her a book.

whereas you can't ever say:

Ik luister haar graag.

you have to say:

Ik luister graag naar haar.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/IaWE4J

Why 'I listen to the birds with pleasure.' but not 'I am listening to the birds with pleasure'

6 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/debrucenator

Well, if someone does something 'graag' like naar iets luisteren, that's describing something that person habitually likes to do.

Ik luister graag naar muziek als ik teken. I like listening to music while I'm drawing.

If someone is doing something right now and wants to express that they're doing it "with pleasure," they're more likely to say that they 'zit lekker' doing something (and it doesn't always necessarily mean that that person is sitting either.)

Ik zit nog lekker buiten naar de vogels te luisteren. I'm still outside enjoying myself listening to the birds.

6 months ago