"Io arrostisco la carne."

Translation:I roast the meat.

May 7, 2013

27 Comments
This discussion is locked.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ChristianC194

God! The speaker sucks! I am italian and sometimes I don't understand what it say!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/temporalthings

The voice is saying it like "arrosisco". Is that how you say it, even though that's not how it's spelt?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/f.formica

No... Actually, "arrossisco" means "I blush".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/tango-alpha

I agree. The speaker missed a T in the previous question as well. Il posto sounded like il posso. Please report incorrect audio.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/faincut

Go veg, stop pushing me meat... :)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Shawltje

Should have been seitan!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Revilo_N

Is there a rule when ire-verbs use the "isc" and when not?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Alf42

Broil is given as a possible in the drop down and is marked wrong as an answer.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jaye16

always choose the first word on the drop down


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/carolfair

what is arrostisco ... the conjugation for arrostare is arrosto ... I roast. ?????


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ThomasHell2

I think that "arrosto" means "roast", as in "pollo arrosto", roast chicken. "Arrostire" is conjugated similarly to "finire" and "io arrostisco" is correct.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/TitoB.Yoto

My dictionary does not have "arrostare" only "arrostire".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MintySciurus

arrostare is an obsolete verb meaning to drive/chase something away (e.g. flying insects) using a fan made from a bunch of twigs (rosta) or the hands. While arrostire means to roast, toast or grill.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AlexKri

I also don't hear "T" in this word! And, BTW the same applies to "nostre" in some other examples...


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mprdo

Has been corrected as of 09Sep15. "T" is pronounced!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DavidPantalone

Why is "lo" used here? It seems redundant. [I roast it the meat]


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MihailDimitrov

Why 'bake' is not accepted here?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/HaroldWonh

This is a technical point. You roast foodstuffs that do not change their structure when heated; if several materials combine and the structure changes, that is called "baking".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MihailDimitrov

This is awfully confusing for me. One roasts vegetables and meat but bakes fish and potatoes... and basically the procedure is the same. Especially if you never cook the connotation of these verbs is a total mystery... -_


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MintySciurus

Its a good question. As HaroldWonh says, baking can mean cooking something that will transform its shape or structure when cooked, like a cake (or a pizza, since the dough rises during baking). While roasting basically means cooking in the oven (nel forno). Baking can also be used to mean roasting something while it is covered (with a lid, or foil, or pastry, or a sauce, or in its own skin).

https://www.thekitchn.com/whats-the-difference-between-roasting-and-baking-word-of-mouth-211695

"al forno" typically means baked (to the oven), whilst "arrosto" means roasted, but you can also have "arrosto al forno" which means oven roasted.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ilsignoredavid

...and why can't you "fry" meat but you can "fry" fish??? Pan frying steak is a common way of preparing a meat meal.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JIS9E

Is "io" really necessary here? Isn't it included in "arrostisco"? Couldn't we just say "arrostisco la carne"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/XlUi8bZ7

If "arrostico" means "I roast", why do we need "io" in this sentence. This isn't a reflexive sentence.??


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Stefan_Hey

It is not a reflexive verb.
But ”arrostico” means ”(I) roast”
”I” is implied by the conjugation form, which allows to drop a personal pronoun in Italian.
You can use it or omit it, it depends on the context (which we do not know here) so in this case both versions technically should be correct.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/XlUi8bZ7

Thank you Stefan. A lingot for you.

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