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  5. "Der Fisch schwamm im Wasser."

"Der Fisch schwamm im Wasser."

Translation:The fish swam in the water.

July 25, 2014

24 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Drachen

Ich höre Englisch und Deutsch ähnlich hier.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Mathso2

Ja, die zwei Sprache sind hier ziemlich ähnlich! I wonder to what degree Germans can understand English?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Ungewitig_Wiht

Not very well I'd imagine what with all the French words and the weird vowels. Probably about as well as an anglophone understands German


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JJ1856

'swam' was accepted, but how about 'was swimming'?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SorrisoMW

Should be accepted, too. This distinction doesn't exist in German.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JJ1856

Thanks SorrisoMW


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Randonneur3

How about 'used to swim'? I am thinking of how the French imperfect works.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/rowschank

German has such a beautiful past tense, but no! They must show their German-ness (Germanity?) and do something so complex to leave a learner confused about Perfect and Praeteritum just as they're coming out of genitive and dative shocks.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Andrew-Macdonald

Correct me if I'm wrong, but modern-day German (or at least in modern day spoken German) the only verbs you need to know the preterite forms of are the modal verbs. For every other verb you can use the perfect instead of the preterite.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Mathso2

From what I've heard, it seems that the perfect is used when speaking, however you can often find the preterite in written forms of modern German. In speech, as you said, it is good to know the past tense of modals and also sein - "Ich bin glücklich gewesen" sounds a bit long winded compared to "Ich war glücklich".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SyamkumarR

What form should I use if the subject was "Fishes"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/-Copernicus-

"Die Fische schwammen im Wasser"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/kiwiintv

"the fish swam in the water" sounds extremely unnatural in english. is it just me?


[deactivated user]

    It sounds fine to me.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SeanMeaneyPL

    As part of a narrative (in a children's book, for example) it could work. The fish swam in the water, all the way to the rock, and then he played with the mermaid.

    Most of the time, though, I would expect "The fish was swimming in the water".


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Wayne____

    I can't think of a better place for them to swim.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/TriggerSmooth

    swim, swam; schwimm, schwamm

    easy !


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Thrym

    So, correct me if I'm wrong, but I understand this sentence as referring to a single fish, rather than a group. A single fish (it) should have no special word ending, but a group of fish (they) should be "schwammen" (strong verb in the sie form ends with"en"). Right?


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/-Copernicus-

    Correct. One fish, as in this sentence, is "Der Fisch schwamm," and multiple fish would be "Die Fische schwammen."


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jon-dan

    Would the German for "The fish swam in water" (without "the") be different?


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/-Copernicus-

    Yes, that would use "in Wasser" rather than "im."


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jon-dan

    Thank you for clearing that up for me..


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RobertHJMa

    'The fish were swimming in the water' Should be accepted, surely?


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/-Copernicus-

    No, "der Fisch" is singular: "The fish was swimming."

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