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  5. "Mon beau-père raconte souven…

"Mon beau-père raconte souvent des mensonges."

Translation:My father-in-law often tells lies.

May 13, 2020

10 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/kwasi1507

I said "My father-in-law often lies" It should've been accepted...


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Sitesurf

To tell lies = dire/raconter des mensonges
To lie = mentir

My father-in-law often lies = Mon beau-père ment souvent.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/kwasi1507

Yeah but they mean the same thing, don't they?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/tachyonashley123

Yes, but they probably want to be sure you know the meaning of "raconte".

Usually if a literal translation is possible, that's what Duo is after. Not always, but usually.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Seth_UJ_Herning

They do mean the same thing, and I feel "My father-in-law often lies/lies often" is more natural. Will report it.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Gerry-H

I did the same, and I would agree that the two are identical in meaning. For that matter, "he often lies" would be equally correct as "he lies often."


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/howcheng

Identical in meaning, but not in syntax/grammar.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Alice713006

Someone didn't have to write 'I must not tell lies' over and over again in the headmistress' office...


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Graham914003

'tells' is hardly necessary in English if 'lies' is used as a verb.

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