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"Él puede impedir el turismo."

Translation:He can prevent tourism.

5 years ago

62 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/severalbees

Only you can prevent tourism.

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/nohaypan

If they are quoting George W Bush, he was trying to say 'terrorism'.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/karimagon

He can do it all by himself. He must get up very early in the morning.

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Fluent2B

Only an obnoxious, armed and dangerous Smokey the Bear can prevent both forest fires AND tourism!

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/krow10
krow10
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Está bien. El oso lo logra. Sin turistas, fuegos en los bosques bajan.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/icallmyselfLee

¡Armas son buenas!

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/risk-free

Thanks Duolingo for the amusement :)

9 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JimVahl

I'm guessing that the sense of "impeder" is closer to hinder or impede than to prevent.

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JimVahl

I looked this up on line and it appears that I am wrong. The first translation of impeder is to stop or prevent, although it can also mean to impede or hinder.

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/PERCE_NEIGE
PERCE_NEIGE
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Thanks! Brilliant. So, the English translation is wrong, I report it! It should be "He hinders the turism", or "He impedes the turism".

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/camillab8
camillab8
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"impede" was not accepted on my first try, so I tried "inhibit." Also not accepted.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Mariajosegrech

Because it is "impide" (él/ella/ello/ impide).

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SGuthrie0

Yes, "Impedir" = "impede." "Impede" has both meanings, depending on context. .

7 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/kstb

Why not "He can stop the tourism?" Granted, the sentence is awkward, but IN GENERAL the sentence is not one we would typically hear.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/PERCE_NEIGE
PERCE_NEIGE
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Is he superman? It's really a weird sentence, I can imagine a context where a man alone can "prevent" tourism, the sentence would make sense in my opinion with "it" instead of "he".

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/EdK4kY

Sólo Kim Jong Un

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Craig877964

Funny!

6 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/michelle596621

Sólo El Chappo. :)

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SGuthrie0

Through 9/11, Osama bin Ladan seriously impeded tourism (impedir), although he did not "prevent" it. (prevenir)

7 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Craig877964

Hello SGuthrie0: This is true.

5 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/martind611973

Think he put that brochure under that ton of garbage?

5 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AngyHelene

Sólo un dictador puede impedir tourimo.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/PeterBushn1

Like Fidel Castro

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/John982085

It was superpower trying to destroy Fidel that prevented tourism in his country, though they have built an airport at Guantanimo.

5 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Craig877964

Hello John982085: The only "tourists" at camp gitmo are terrorists.

5 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JimVahl

Peter, John and Craig: Please refrain from using this forum to express your political views.

5 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Craig877964

Hello JimVahl: Was it ok that I responded to remarks by EdK4kY and SGuthrie0, but not by remarks by John982085?

5 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/gernt
gernt
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"He can impede tourism" was accepted.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/percyflage

El narco? Verdad, y no una broma.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/David_AAA
David_AAA
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I would use "impedir" to mean "obstruct"

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SGuthrie0

"obstruct" = obstruir. "Impedir" = "impede".

For more accurate, correct, translations, it is usually best to stick with the cognate.

And easier, as well. Why try to think up more obscure words when the obvious work well?

7 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Craig877964

Hello SGuthrie0: I love those lines: "For more accurate, correct, translations, it is usually best to stick with the cognate.

And easier, as well. Why try to think up more obscure words when the obvious work well?". Lingots for you.

5 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SGuthrie0

Craig. Gracias. I'm glad you appreciate the point. Some do not.

3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Craig877964

I think that your posts have helped many people trying to learn!

3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/TilEulenspiegel

"El" cannot be translated as "it"? Interesting.

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jindr004
jindr004
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"El" can be translated as "it", but "Él" is "He/him", with the exception of animals where English refers to a bull, or a stallion as 'It" but Spanish recognizes the gender in the pronoun.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SGuthrie0

jindr004. My father had a male horse. He referred to the horse as "he", not it. Our female cats have been "she", and our male cats were "he."

As a child, my wife grew up on a farm and had a favororite male cow, referred to as "he." That was until they ate it.

"It" is for impersonal things. By the way, we speak English.

7 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/zadok
zadok
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Would this work? This is the first thing my mind went to: "Ese volcán es muy peligroso recientemente, y él puede impedir el turismo."

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/gernt
gernt
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Not él. That's he or him. It would have to be el without an accent.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/zadok
zadok
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But the volcano is "he" in Spanish, yes, since all nouns are either feminine or masculine? I thought "el" without accent was just for the article, which is definitely not the case here. Is there still actually a distinction between animate and inanimate objects, which animate objects marked as "él" and inanimate "el?"

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/gernt
gernt
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Sorry this is in Spanish, but it's pretty clear cut: http://es.answers.yahoo.com/question/index?qid=20091120131955AA73kl8

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/zadok
zadok
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Hmmm... looking through that, all the examples use "él" as a pronoun and "el" as an article. Through talking to a lot of folk about this, it seems like, though in theory one could, and would, use "él" to refer to a non-human objects, it's generally only used with people. Non-human objects either don't use a pronoun at all or use "este/esta/etc." Does this make sense to you, or do you have any examples of "el" without an accent being used specifically as a pronoun?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/gernt
gernt
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Try this thread and see Talant's entry: http://forum.wordreference.com/showthread.php?t=1892484 . You understand I was just speaking of what Duo might or might not accept, and not what's right or wrong.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/bevdiller

Un oso y una osa están en mi jardín. Él está sentado en el banco y ella nada en la piscina. Is that correct use of "él" for it/the male bear?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/LoesVanBos
LoesVanBos
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Looks like another example of Duo's literal translations. In context, something that prevents tourism would more likely be an "it" that is male in Spanish, like zadok's volcano, or a tsunami, than a single person. Then again, él IS he, and not an it, if we're looking at grammar without thinking about the subject's power. There is no context, so maybe we should just stick to semantics. Or maybe - there is no context, so that makes it even more okay to imagine our own, and use "it" if it fits? I can't decide. Do you think it should be reported?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/supermollusc
supermollusc
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"He can prevent tourism" sounds odd It should be "it"

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SGuthrie0

Be careful not to confuse "él" as a subject, vs. "él" as an object of a preposition. Él as a subject is always "he" if it refers to a person.

Pronouns take the gender of that to which the refer. If the pronoun as an object of a preposition refers to a masculine noun, it will use "él". If it refers to a feminine noun, it will be "ella". If the object of a preposition refers to an indefinite "it", it can be "ello," or "el"

El niño brincó sobre la camA convencido de que había algo debajo de ellA. ¡Olvídate de ellO! Aquí esta el sobre [male noun]. Hay algo dentro de él. Ese insectO parece inocente pero todavía tengo miedo de él.

7 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/captben_71

Why not " He can prevent THE tourism " as a literal translation of el?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JimVahl

Some nouns in English don't require articles in front of them (I'm sure that there's a name for these, but I don't know it). "Tourism" is one of these. So we always say just "tourism" and never "a tourism" or "the tourism".

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/BrianCort

"He can interfere with tourism." Should be accepted. I have reported it.

10 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Ian866281

Would someone send him to Victoria, BC this summer? I'm tired of tourists.

7 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/michelle596621

I think 'impede' would be a better translation.

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JimVahl

Michelle, if you would look above in this thread to about 4 years ago you would find that I made the same comment. However you'll also find that I did some research and changed my opinion. As natural as it seems, translating a cognate to its English equivalent is not always correct.

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SoyRondo

Who is Donald Trump?

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SGuthrie0

He is a person who is impeding tourism to Cuba from the U.S. , after President Obama opened it up. (June 2018)

3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Arsha123
Arsha123
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Why?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Foomancrue

No, "He can stop tourism" ?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/CatherineC462091

empedir d sounds like t T T not d

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/EricRaphae

Sounds like an episode of scooby doo.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Martin788020

Answer is a poorly constructed sentence

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/herbert1985
herbert1985
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Thanks Obama

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/blackbirdfly

the first time i see the word - impedir .. should be written first

5 years ago