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"Cada cosa requiere su lenguaje."

Translation:Each thing requires its own language.

5 years ago

36 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/anniewicker

I don't understand this sentence. Everything requires its own language, but there is no possesive 'propia' or something to indicate that. Can it be, everything requires its language?

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Rickydito

Rule 99. "Do not translate literally" This is an idiomatic expression. It can't be translated word for word.

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/anniewicker

I understand not to translate literally, it a basic foundation of learning a language. It does not help me understand why this sentence functions this way.

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Rickydito

annie: What don't you understand?

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/PhillipMcN2

@Rickydito
Also to every interested reader

Announcement: I am here today to disagree with Rickydito.

In this same forum thread, Rickydito made three posts five years ago which basically say the same message.

Unfortunately, not enough advanced language learners have read the three posts by Rickydito; and consequently, not enough people have down voted his three posts. I advocate that readers down vote his three posts. I mean the three posts that make the same erroneous point.

"Rule 99" is dogma.

Instead of devotion to dogma, I recommend a process of translation that includes multiple steps. The first step in the process is to translate literally. The remainder of the steps can be discussed in a different forum thread. Let's move forward to my next point.

Regarding the assertion that the featured Spanish sentence of this exercise is an idiomatic expression:

No it is not an idiomatic expression unless you believe that the featured Spanish sentence is a genuine (real) Spanish expression and that there are no errors. I need to explain why the featured sentence is not a genuine Spanish expression without errors.

In some cases, it takes a very long time for Duolingo to correct errors in the exercises. For many years, this exercise has not been corrected. This exercise currently has an error. It is an error of omission because the Spanish sentence is currently missing a word. I mean this Duolingo exercise is bugged.

"Cada cosa requiere su lenguaje." ...Currently this is the featured Spanish sentence of the exercise.

On the other hand:
Cada cosa requiere su proprio lenguaje. ...This sentence is illustrating the correction for the bug in the exercise.

In the future after this Duolingo exercise is corrected, can you all see why nobody in this forum thead will need to talk about the issue with translating literally anymore?

3 days ago

https://www.duolingo.com/eshewan

"Everything requires its language" is accepted now

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/david.godfrey

What does this sentence even mean??

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/BillEverett
BillEverett
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I think there is a similar English saying: "Different strokes for different folks."

A comment on the inevitable and tolerable variety of people and their ways - http://www.dictionary.com/browse/different-strokes-for-different-folks

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/mattnag
mattnag
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I wonder the same thing. Perhaps it refers to electronics that must each be programmed in its own coding language. That's just an uneducated guess though.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/pdhaigh
pdhaigh
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Why could this not be translated as "Everything requires your language"?

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Rickydito

pdhaigh: Literally, it could, but this is an idiomatic expression and only has one meaning.

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/suezq
suezq
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That is all I needed to hear- idiomatic expression. Thanks I will try to learn it.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/PhillipMcN2

@Rickydito
Also to every interested reader

Scroll up until you find my previous reply to Rickydito.

After you read my earlier post, please remember to come back to this location for the purpose of down voting each post by Rickydito.

3 days ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Daphne177862

That's what I put and it was marked correct, but it makes no sense.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/VirtualLearning

Cada=Each

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Rickydito

Rule 99. "Do not translate literally" This is an idiomatic expression. It can't be translated word for word.

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/PhillipMcN2

@Rickydito
Also to every interested reader

Scroll up until you find my long reply to Rickydito. You find it near the top of the page.

After you read my earlier post, please remember to come back to this location for the purpose of down voting each post by Rickydito.

3 days ago

https://www.duolingo.com/paolomar77
paolomar77
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what's the difference between everything and every thing?

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SMAGringo

Everything: all of them; every thing: each one of them

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/recluse118

Everything is spelled together. Every thing should be written as everything.

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/LydiaSande

everything spelled as one word means todo...every thing as two words means cada cosa... two different things

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MaDhyan
MaDhyan
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I totally agree. In English we would say 'each thing' (cada cosa), not 'every thing'. So 'Each thing requires its own language' is obviously the correct translation of this phrase. (I translated it as 'Everything has its own language', which was accepted but it was pointed out that I had missed the space between 'Every' and 'thing'.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/tecalai

I'm a native English-speaker and I used "everything." I also considered "each thing," but "everything" seemed more natural to me. I was a bit puzzled by the meaning of this sentence.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/nohaypan

I think paolomar77 has asked an interesting question, and I agree with Lydia that there is a distinction between "everything" and "every thing," albeit a small and not very crucial one -- and one that may not be relevant to the original Spanish sentence. In any case it is misleading to suggest that "every thing" cannot be written in English, e.g. "each and every thing" cannot be written without the space.

"Every thing has its own voice" is slightly more emphatic than the alternative, suggesting that you have thought carefully about each thing before coming to that conclusion, while "Everything has its own voice" might be a generalization which admits of exceptions.

The same distinction exists between "everyone" and "every one." Dickens concluded "A Christmas Carol" with the sentence "God bless us every one" rather than the relatively bland "God bless everyone." (Unfortunately his sentence doesn't work without the "us").

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/LydiaSande

If this is an idiomatic expression with only one correct translation, then perhaps duo needs to mark idiomatic expressions so we can recognize them. Without knowing that, this sentence could be translated literally in several ways.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Talca
Talca
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There should be a branch on the tree for idiomatic phrases and another one for verbs that work like gustar.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/mattnag
mattnag
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I'm not sure when you posted that comment, but there is now a branch for Spanish idioms, but it's a bonus skill that costs 30 lingots.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/travelingplans

I understand that this is an idiomatic expression - but what does it mean?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/tecalai

It doesn't even seem idiomatic as it is a fairly direct translation, but I am with you. I really am not sure what it means.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/PratitiShi

lengua or lenguaje?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SMAGringo

It is interesting that on these idiomatic expressions, Duo translates each word separately, giving no hint that it is idiomatic, and not a word for word translation. If you used each of the words in the drop down, in any combination, you would not get the "correct" answer.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Solvind
Solvind
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Also known as "aptum" in rhetoric.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/KyleFenorme

Say whaaaat?

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/YeseniaSal457479

"Su" does not mean "your"!!!! "Tu" means "your," Duolingo

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SMAGringo

Actually, "su" does mean "your" also..not the familiar "your", which is tu, but the formal singular (usted) and the plural "your" (ustedes)

2 years ago