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"Personne ne veut attacher sa ceinture dans le bus."

Translation:No one wants to fasten their seatbelt on the bus.

May 19, 2020

17 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MCamilleE

Isn't "No one on the bus wants to attach his seatbelt" also right. I think it's more proper English.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/geoffreymayer

I think there's a slight difference. Your version is is specific to the the people on the bus. Duo's version in French and English is general.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/rem-bert

Just a question regarding that general English version: it states 'their' followed by a singular seatbelt, shouldn't that be plural? Like: no one wants to fasten their seatbelts on the bus.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jillhibberd

put on is English for fastening your seat belt. Should be marked as correct


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RodrigoRequiao

Why isn't there "pas" after "veut"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/1VPYwmlp

there is already "personne" (no one) for the negative. it's like saying "no one doesn't want to fasten their seatbelt on the bus"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RodrigoRequiao

I see; I thought that "personne" had the meaning of "someone" in the sentence, which would need the "pas", I guess. Anyway, you're telling me that there is no double negative in French? Because in Portuguese, which is a romance language as French, you can use double negatives (or even triple) without altering the meaning of the sentences, as in:

Não tem ninguém aqui com esse nome não.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AndrewHill1991

The word "personne" is "someone" to my understanding, but the "ne" makes it negative like with "rien/jamais/plus" and all those.

It is basically a word that works instead of "pas" and can come in front or back depending.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DianaM

"Une personne" is "a person":
"Il y a une personne dans la cuisine"
"There is a person in the kitchen"

"Personne...ne" is "no one", or "nobody".

If you wanted to say, "Someone doesn't want to fasten...etc.", I think you might say "Une personne ne veut pas attacher...etc." but more likely "Quelqu'un ne veut pas attacher...etc."


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/titanesk

On a également en français la double ou triple négation. Par ex. : "On peut lui offrir cette robe." ou "On ne peut pas ne pas lui offrir cette robe." qui a le même sens mais la deuxième phrase est plus insistante sur l'impossibilité de l'action. La littérature française regorgent de telles syntaxes. Bon courage Thierry


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SamLaBestia

I was curious, so I tried "Nobody wants to attach his belt in the bus", but that was rejected 10 October 2020.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/geoffreymayer

"Nobody wants to fasten his seatbelt on the bus." is accepted.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Martyn413385

Beware of sweeping generalisations! Keep safe - buckle-up!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/KeithWalde2

Why must 'ceinture' be translated as 'seatbelt' rather than 'belt'? Ithought 'seatbelt' was (with the proper accents) 'ceinture de securite.'


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DianaM

If our word for "seatbelt" was seven syllables long, we'd probably shorten it, too. As I understand it, when the context is clearly a vehicle, then "ceinture" is assumed to mean "seatbelt".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Babbaloo

Is le bus actually pronounced without the "s"???

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