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"There is no milk left."

Translation:No queda leche.

2
4 years ago

110 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/DougRogers

There is no way anyone could get this right with the definitions given

391
Reply93 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DanD_8
DanD_8
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I was given a choice of three phrases containing words I've never seen :)

98
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Lonewolf969

@DanD8 yup that is the way it is

6
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DanD_8
DanD_8
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It's encouraging that a lot of these idiomatic expressions feel natural now. When I posted my first comment I was at a fairly low level. Sometimes the only way to learn things like this is to see them enough times that you internalize the structure.

144
Reply73 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Sadhuseva

yep , practice makes perfect ... there are not always direct translations for different languages so we must be grateful when there is and patient when its new to us !!

6
Reply9 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MatousAc
MatousAc
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I absolutely agree.

5
Reply1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Carly642226

Good to hear! I noticed the same thing and it is good to know that to learn a language, that is the way it happens and don't get discouraged!

2
Reply17 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/TrillianneShadow

How long between posts?

0
Reply11 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DanD_8
DanD_8
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I'm not sure how long ago I posted both of those comments, but they were many, many months apart.

7
11 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ReneciaMcc

Me as well and none of them included queda.

0
Reply3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/joshuaorjosh33

Try to not rely on the suggestions

55
Reply13 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/PenguiN42

People downvoted you but you're right. The suggestions are a crib that weaken the learning process.

8
Reply2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/onlycookie
onlycookie
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They can do both, it's up to the person using them to decide. I find it actually increases my (personal) learning speed, if I can peek, feeling less punished and being 'rewarded' for the right thing I wrote. This does not always work, but the general trend for me is, I remember the right one better if I peek and then get a 'pling' (connecting it to 'good') for 'right' than if I go blind and get the 'plong' for 'wrong'.

20
Reply22 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MatousAc
MatousAc
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I realize I do that too much. Now i have no correct sense of sentence structure nor vocabulary. I am working to improve this.

3
Reply1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/sgtaal
sgtaal
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I put 'No hay leche' and it marked me correct.

3
Reply11 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/rowith
rowith
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I put "No hay más leche." and was marked correct.

0
Reply8 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Bruce768614

I wrote "No hay leche dejado." and was marked wrong. I had considered your answer and thought surely Duo would not like it.

0
Reply3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ReneciaMcc

I agree, queda was not mentioned anywhere when talking on the words for the answers.

0
Reply3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/CynthiaBal3

What about no hay leche partido

25
Reply4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/eGhost57
eGhost57
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If you wanted to tell someone that, "There is no milk." Then, "No hay leche." would be sufficient. But for this sentence we need to say, "There is no milk left."

As you know, the English word left as several meanings, the direction left, left hand, the passed tense of leave, and in this case remaining. So before you just go grab any Spanish word that could be translated into "left" you need to understand what the sentence is really trying to say.

"There is no milk left." = "There is no milk remaining." = "No milk remains."

Now that you know what we are really trying to say, now that you understand the sense of the English phrase, you choose the Spanish words that convey that sense, not simply any word that can translate into "left." In this case the only choice is Quedar which has the meaning or sense of "to stay / to remain" among other meanings.

12
Reply172 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Joy634551

Thanks for a lovely explanation, Eghost 57, especially "now that you understand the sense of the English phrase, you choose the Spanish words that convey that sense" ....I feel like there can be a certain linguistic arrogance in English speakers who assume that everything should be literally translatable from/into English and get annoyed if it is not.

11
Reply2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DesireeF2

When I see that it's not literally translatable, I'm like "Darn, more words and grammar to remember"... English has spoiled us with Homonyms and Homographs... And I think Spanish speakers are spoiled with the verb conjugations...Trabajas vs. You work...sounds easier to me. LoL

1
Reply2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/tfrager

Thank you for this easy to understand explanation.

2
Reply2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/tanii.xx

I only got this correct the same way i passed spanish in high school - elimination process lol neither 'estudio' nor 'sabemos' made sense so 'queda' was the only thing left. I'm glad i checked the comments though, thank you for this thorough explantion!

1
Reply7 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Jnunez1204

This is very helpful but if i don't remember that word/translation, and it doesn't give me the option...screwed :(

0
Reply1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/eGhost57
eGhost57
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No you're not. Trial and error with teach you over time.

1
Reply1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/reastwoodstone

Isn't partido about leaving/departing. Where quedar is to stay or remain. So its there's no milk remaining. Although I thought no hay made sense to start the sentence. I had 'no hay queda leche.' Which was wrong. Can anyone say why no hay doesn't precede queda here

2
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Drumknott
Drumknott
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I think because "no hay leche" means "there is no milk" and "no queda leche" means "no milk remains," so if you put them together you'd have something like " there is no milk remains," or "there is no milk is left," giving you two active verbs doing the job of one. I don't remember all the correct terminology regarding active/passive verbs, gerunds, participles, etc. but it does come out differently than saying in English, "There is no milk left" or "there is no milk remaining," which I'm guessing was your intention.

So the Spanish "no queda leche" translates to the English "no milk remains" or "no milk is left," which has the same meaning as when we say in English "there is no milk left."

hope this helps

33
Reply43 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/James_Hadfield

I couldn't understand why queda was a valid answer, this helped me. Thank you!

2
Reply2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/haspiehime

Thank you so much. This cleared up a lot of questions in my mind. I guess i do have a lot to learn...

0
Reply2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Duomail
Duomail
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Incorrect.

0
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Nealbo

Any chance of telling us all why this is incorrect and meaningless?

10
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Duomail
Duomail
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I'm sorry, When I wrote that, I had not much time. Moreover, now I think I used a wrong word . As anyone can see in my profile, I'm not a native English speaker...
I thought "meaningless" as lacking of meaning, as to the language, and I didn't mean to be disrespectful or offensive, so is this word?

The sentence "no hay leche partido" doesn't make sense because:
1. "leche" is feminine, then it'd have to be "leche partida".
2. "leche partida" doesn't have a meaning in Spanish. At most, it sounds a little similar to "leche cortada" (spoiled milk, buttermilk) but has no proper meaning anyway. So it would be like saying "there is no partitioned/split/broken milk", or similar to "milk split" like "banana split" ?

If the Duolingo's hint says "partido" for "left", maybe it corresponds to the past participle of "partir" (to leave) with sense of "depart".

"To be left" altogether is a phrasal verb, so untranslatable word by word separately.

I hope it helps. Took a long time to elaborate...

66
Reply73 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/LexOnDuolingo

"Meaningless," while technically correct, has strong connotations toward "extremely trivial," "futile," or "pointless." I think the word you seek is "nonsensical" or maybe "incomprehensible."

5
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/InternetUser
InternetUser
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>2015

>not partitioning your milk

3
Reply2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Nealbo

Great explanation, thank you :) I think it does come down to the incorrect suggestion of using the past participle of partir by Duolingo.

Queda used to mean "left" in terms of "it remains" definitely does make more sense.

1
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Joy634551

It might help if you think of the Duolingo suggestions as possible translations of that word rather than hints to help you get the question right. The past participle of partir is not incorrect as a possible translation of "left", it simply does not work in this context. Language is complex, Duolingo is an automated program, and it is free. I am deeply grateful to the people who have created and maintain it. What an awesome job!

2
2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/VivianMPatenaude

Could HAY NO ES QUEDA LECHE be correct?

0
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/roycee24

Nope

2
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/cosmopolita61
cosmopolita61
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It should work without partido?

0
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/RominaOrtega1

NO, it shouldn't.

0
Reply2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/mohrchen

Why is no leche queda wrong?

7
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/eGhost57
eGhost57
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because you cannot put the subject between "no" and the verb. The only thing that can go between "no" and its verb are object pronouns.

4
Reply2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/elissaf1
elissaf1
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I think it's because milk is the object rather than the subject. (Spanish seems to have conceptually based roles, rather than positional, as done in English.)

So in Spanish, you omit the subject if there isn't one, whereas in English, we'd need to add something silly, as in "it is raining", despite there being no "it".

(I'm not a native speaker, I'm not sure how accurate my theory is. But Spanish does something similar with indirect object pronouns, ie, treats them as indirect objects based on semantics, even if the direct object is missing. In English, direct/indirect objects are positional, not conceptual.)

2
Reply2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DanD_8
DanD_8
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I thought leche was the subject of queda. Often it becomes quedan to agree with plural subjects. I'm not sure, but on Spanishdict.com their intransitive example seems to fit

http://www.spanishdict.com/translate/quedar

"¿queda azúcar?is there any sugar left?"

If this example is intransitive, then there is no direct object.

2
Reply2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/elissaf1
elissaf1
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That site also has as its first example, quedar as a transitive:

  1. (to remain) a. to be left ¿Quedan asientos para nosotros?Are there any seats left for us?

I'm not certain how seats can be the object, while sugar is the subject of a very similar sentence.

However, these sentences do appear to have a zero-subject in the subject place, although they do agree in number with the noun in the object place. (Colour me confused.)

2
Reply2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DanD_8
DanD_8
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I was taught that zero subject verbs are never plural. :/ I'm not sure.

1
Reply2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/elissaf1
elissaf1
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Well, you are more experienced, and it's still kinda a blur to me. Just on THAT basis I would think you're correct.. But even more so, I agree that the conjugation points out to this being a subject, as you stated earlier.

1
12 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Brown_Ciara

I thought it was hay no leche partio?

5
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/elcaltrider

If duolingo is going to teach it might help if they teach proper meanings of words and give correct definitions. Its only because of nice people in comments that explain "why". that is somethimg this app is natively lacking

5
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Ahmeda111

What does queda even mean?

5
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/bluebunny84ppg

Good question Ahmeda111! Queda comes from quedar, which means to have left, to have remaining.

3
Reply2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/eGhost57
eGhost57
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It can also mean "to stay" and from there you can you use it to describe how clothing fits.

  • No me queda bien.

Which literally means, "It doesn't stay well to me." or "It doesn't fit me well."

3
Reply12 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/bluebunny84ppg

And like 15 other things, but in this case, it means to have left.

What other uses are there?

2
Reply2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/eGhost57
eGhost57
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You can use it to state where something is located.

  • El banco queda en la esquina. - The bank is on the corner.

You can use it reflexively to say where you are staying or to give commands.

  • Nos quedamos en un hotel. - We stayed in a hotel.
  • Quédate. - Stay. (I say this to my dog everyday. He taught me Spanish.)

And it's used in a bunch of expressions and other meanings I'm not yet familiar with. http://www.wordreference.com/es/en/translation.asp?spen=quedar

2
Reply2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/barry_boettger

Thank you. I'm also enrolled on-line with fluencia - just did a clothing unit and couldn't make sense of the use of queda.

0
Reply2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/TonyTuseth

How about, HAY no queda leche?

3
Reply14 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Fuddytree

I put "no hay leche" it was incorrect but apparently because I had left a word out: "más" - if I had put "no hay más leche" it would have been correct - hope this helps : )

4
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/debusscs

I was given no hay leche as the correct answer by DL

0
Reply2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/momomomo57

I just used "no hay más leche " and DL was fine with it.

3
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Peacon

I used 'no hay leche' and DL accepted it as correct!

1
Reply2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/faith46
faith46
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Why not "No hay leche que queda ."

3
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/eGhost57
eGhost57
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It's technically correct but it's unnecessarily wordy, which is probably why it's not in their correct answer list. In a real world scenario you'd just say either:

  • No hay leche. = "There is no milk."
  • No queda leche. = "No milk remains." = "There is no milk left."

Both get your point across, only the second directly translates into the English sentence in question.

1
Reply2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/billrbds

Sorry about that post, I take It back.

0
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/roy.leihong
roy.leihong
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Same question.

0
Reply2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/NathanielS562475

Just tried no queda leche ~ DL accepted..

2
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/billrbds

Both Google and Dictionary have "izquierda" in them. As in left hand...ha.

2
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jfurey944

Why is "no hay leche restante" incorrect?

1
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/raymondoboru

I agree; there is no way anyone could get this right from the given definitions and previous exercises.

1
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/44767mt

Google translates "There is no milk left" as "No hay izquierda leche". Is Google wrong? From Spanishdict.com " No hay leche izquierda" Are they wrong?

1
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/strwberryskttles

Izquierda means the direction left, as in turn left or right at the corner. Google is translating the word literally but this sentence uses "left" as in "remaining".

3
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/skepticalways

OK, it seems everything I try is wrong these days; maybe it's because Duo is trying to advance me rapidly from stilted, limited beginner's Spanish to more conversational, idiomatic sentences. However, when "hay" is GIVEN for "there is," what's wrong with saying "Hay es no leche," or "Hay esta no leche," (since it seems that being out of milk is conditional upon present circumstances & not a state of being)?

1
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ChrisWhatever

The problem is that 'hay' is a verb and so is 'es' so you wouldn't use them together. It would be a little like saying 'There is (hay) is (es) no milk'.

1
Reply2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/skepticalways

Gracias, Chris. I look at this months later and see "No hay más leche" is being accepted. At the time I wasn't clear about the verb being there, as you surmised.

2
Reply2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SusannaEDavis420

I put "No leche queda" and it was counted wrong. Does someone know why?

1
Reply2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Talca
Talca
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The verb needs to be next to the negation: No queda leche.

1
Reply2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SusannaEDavis420

Oh, I know that, but I got confused! ¡Gracias, Talca!

0
Reply2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SaffirePullins

I thought quedar was to stay or was it quedarse?

1
Reply2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/elissaf1
elissaf1
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Quedar (transitive) means to be left. Quedarse (reflexive) means to stay.

3
Reply2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/sax51

I put no hay, there is there are, could this be used as well?

1
Reply2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/bobbyd98682

It would have been nice to have queda as a suggestion. I was hoping to have it bring this word to memory :-(

1
Reply1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ngarrang
ngarrang
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No milk remains...got it.

1
Reply1 year ago