"I drink typical English beer."

Translation:Je bois de la bière typiquement anglaise.

May 25, 2020

31 Comments
This discussion is locked.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/LaurieHamm4

Why not typique? I would think typiquement would more usually mean typically.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/LaurieHamm4

Or is the meaning more like "typically English" beer? (Modifying English instead of beer) I guess I just answered my own question??


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mplscurt

But "typically/typiquement" are both adverbs, so they should be modifying the verb. "I typically drink English beer." But that's not the sentence that is being asked to be translated. So why the adverb, and if, for some reason, an adverb is appropriate, why is it not following the verb, which is what Duo usually stresses?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/BrianBoru4

It's appropriate because an adverb can qualify an adjective, as here, as well as a verb. As a general rule you put the adverb close to the word it is qualifying to avoid misunderstanding. If you'd put it after the verb you would have changed the sense. To be fair to Duo, whenever it has said the adverb should follow the verb it is where the verb is being qualified. Ultimately all grammatical 'rules' have to be subordinate to conveying the meaning accurately.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mplscurt

Ah, of course. Well-said. Thanks.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Jojo553168

Yes, you did.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/VeenaHari1

What's wrong in ' Je bois de la biere anglaise typiquement' ?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PATRICKPIZ1

french adverbs precede the adjectives they modify.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Tom692084

"je bois de la bière anglaise typique" should also do fine.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Terri__C

What's wrong with je bois de la bière anglaise typique??


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Martyn413385

There is no such thing as typical English beer!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/GuyWhitehe1

I somehow feel that this should be je bois la bier as it is really expressing a drink preference - I drink English beer rather than lager or wine. Can someone explain to me why I am wrong please.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PATRICKPIZ1

yes, it's a drink preference. i drink english beer rather than german beer, or czech beer, or any other beer. that's why it's typically english. and lager is beer. Harviestoun Schiehallion, Hammerton Islington Steam Lager, Fourpure Indy Lager, and Camden Pils are all typically and actually british lagers.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Paul_in_Victoria

Linguee translates typically as "typiquement" and typical as "typique"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/tUFIfpFd

I can't imagine anyone ever saying a sentence like this in English. Is this style of phrase common in French? What would an English equivalent be?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/GuyWhitehe1

I think we just say I like English beer or I usually/normally drink English beer. What would constitute a typical English beer in 2021 is probably open to debate


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Sally974303

Typical modifies beer, not English so it should NOT be ‘typiquement anglaise’, and Duo should accept ‘bière typique’; there is a difference and they should be more careful!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/commediadellarte

'typiquement' is an adverb, here it COULD describe the verb 'boire'. So the beer drinking person typically drinks English beer. I suppose placement of the adverb is like this then: Je bois typiquement de la bière anglaise. If Duo wants to modify the beer, then it is an adjective, and it should be 'biere anglaise typique' indeed.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/GraemeSarg

The problem is that Duo has used the wrong word in the FR→EN exercise. It should be "typically", not "typical".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/commediadellarte

well yes, adjust it this way or that way: either duo corrects the English sentence-to-be-translated to ""I typically drink English beer." or Duo accepts the French translation of the English sentence as is to "Je bois de la bière typique anglaise.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/GraemeSarg

One day, maybe, if we're lucky. I reported it many moons ago.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PATRICKPIZ1

'...typically english beer.' is accepted.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/GraemeSarg

How can it be? Only responses in French are accepted.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/commediadellarte

why does it have to be 'de la'? if the speaker means that in genereal he drinks beer (but NOT wine), it would be je bois de bierre, no?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/GraemeSarg

No, that would be "la bière".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Polyglot8817

I don't understand what 'typically English beer' would be. Would it be a traditional English beer, like Guinness or a stout?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/GuyWhitehe1

a typical English beer would probably be a bitter - dark warm hoppy. As previous correspondents have said these come in a great variety of flavours (and quality). 60 years back every town had its own brewery and flavours - then economies of scale and marketing hit along with continental lagers. Smaller breweries are making a comeback


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Martyn413385

Hi. As I said a while back, there's no such thing. Guinness is Irish (a type of what is known as Irish stout). English stout is also generally a rich very dark brew. There are so many diverse types of beer and hundreds of brands that the best way is to come and try as many as you can manage, when travel permits! In the meantime you could take a look here: https://camra.org.uk/


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PATRICKPIZ1

if typically english means best seller then budweiser is that beer since it is the most purchased beer in britain. but don't feel bad because that's true here in the US too. it turns out that brits are no better connoisseurs of good beer than americans.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Martyn413385

Haha - well, thankfully it doesn't mean that! According to a quick Google "Carling" (Canadian?) may probably be the top-selling lager, however it depends where you look - and the stats seem to focus on the UK as a whole rather than England. What we are left with is that Duo's statement is at least a good conversation-opener!

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