Duolingo is the most popular way to learn languages in the world. Best of all, it's 100% free!

"Lo quisiste."

Translation:You wanted it.

5 years ago

27 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/penguinboy561

Idiomatically the past tense of querer means "to try," not just to want.

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Rickydito

penguin: You are correct. "querer" in preterite tense means "tried"/[Reference #1]: EVERYTHING INTERMEDIATE SPANISH by Rosenthiel, 2007: Page 130: "Some verbs actually change meaning depending on whether you use them in the imperfect or preterite.///////Imperfect: I wanted to speak to Matilde: "Quería hablar con Matilde"//////Preterite: I tried to speak to Matilde: "Quise hablar con Matilde".///// [Reference #2]: 500 SPANISH VERBS by Kendris, 4th Edition: Page xxiv: "Some words that express a mental state have a different meaning when used in the preterite". Examples: 4. Quise llamarle: "I tried to call you"/////[Reference #3]: SPANISH NOW Level 2, Barron's 2009: Page 159: Quise llamarlo: "I tried to call you. Thank you, Penguin, for pointing that out.

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/nbqt
nbqt
  • 13
  • 7

I thought it was you loved him, how can you tell the difference between the two?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/alm711

I learned it as "meant to." So "Quisiste llamar." = "You meant to call." Anyone else learn it this way?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/bal7774

Getting interesting, DL

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/fredbach

How many ways are there to say "YOU"?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Daniel-in-BC

= you familiar singular; Ud. (usted) = you formal singular; Uds. (ustedes) = you formal plural (but used widely in Latin America for both familiar formal); vosotros = you familiar plural (used in Spain, but not much in Latin America)

Note that and vosotros have "their own" conjugations, whereas Ud. and Uds. use the third person (singular and plural respectively)

Edited per comments below: vos (different from vosotros) is also used in some places.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ajabrams

Argentina, Uruguay, Bolivia, Paraguay, el Salvador, Guatemala, Honduras, Nicaragua, Costa Rica, some parts of Venezuala, parts of Columbia, and parts of Peru as well as latino Jews all use Vos.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Alkagu
Alkagu
  • 10
  • 10
  • 7

It is Colombia, not Columbia.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Simstyle12

Tu. Ti. Le. Te. Examples Tu y yo son locos. (Subjects) Es para ti or es de ti. (Used with from/for/of) Pasale (cant explain that one lol) A que hora te vas, or Te amo (Dont know how to explain but its a lesson in duolingo)

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/mslinda6357

I'm so confused about "lo" in a previous sentence it was I love him, now it's you want it. How can it be I or you.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ConaireMor
ConaireMor
  • 17
  • 12
  • 10
  • 7
  • 7
  • 5
  • 5
  • 5
  • 4
  • 3
  • 3
  • 3
  • 3
  • 3
  • 3
  • 2

Lo means it or him (it means "it" in contexts where not referring to humans in English, as there are not masculine and feminine nouns in English), it is a direct object pronoun, meaning it is the object the verb refers to. So in "I love him," I is the subject, love is the verb, and him is the DOP, where the "him" you love could be replaced by his name.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Rickydito

mslinda6357: If you could be more specific, I or someone on this discussion page would be glad to help.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/anielsen31

that is a specific question

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ieroplane

that's what he said :P

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/D-PadRadio

Then RUN to him!

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Dutchesse722
Dutchesse722
  • 25
  • 17
  • 16
  • 12
  • 73

I wrote "You loved him" which was also accepted. In which Spanish-speaking countries do they also use "querer" to mean "to love." I've seen "(Yo) te quiero" in movies from Spain translated as "I love you."

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/khaakenajaf

you did like it. you liked it. duolingo is always confusing the helping verbs like "do, does ", plz any1. can elaborate

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/pedrotaylor

What's wrong with 'did you want it'

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/adrianbyrd123

How many different meanings is lo pleade help

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Gaby55161

I understud "lo que hiciste".

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Amyra20

In "lo siento" there is no "it" or "him", it's simply "i am sorry". Can someone explain this please?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ayeshazahd

The "lo" in "lo quiero" comes before the verb, like "te quiero" is "I want you"---so "lo siento" would mean "I feel it" ... Or "i am sorry for it." Hope this helps.

11 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ayeshazahd

Edit: I meant "lo" in "lo siento" in the first line, whoops!

11 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/KieranHecka

Lo siento literally means "i feel it" which, while not translating to "I'm sorry" directly, serves the same function in español.

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Rickydito

Many native speakers, in any language, do not understand everything about their own language. I advise anyone seeking answers to ask for verification from a reputable source, such as a good high school or college Spanish textbook or a reputable website or a real live Spanish teacher. There is a person who often comments on Duolingo discussion pages and claims to be a native speaker,; he thinks he knows more than the books, but is very often not correct in his comments. All comments need to verified. Like the President says: Trust but verify.

5 years ago