"Air a' Ghàidhealtachd."

Translation:In the Highlands.

June 1, 2020

10 Comments
This discussion is locked.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PhilipWhitaker

I can't make out the difference between the sound of a' Ghalldachd and a' Ghàidhealtacdh no matter how hard I listen. Both sound like a Yell-doch to me...


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/nKur5ZgK

What does this mean literally? The Gaelic area?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/silmeth

Yes, roughly the Gaeldom, the domain of Gaels.

Its Irish cognate – Gaeltacht – is a word used for officially designated Irish-speaking areas where the language has always been spoken traditionally and still is the daily language of significant part of the population.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Slobkra

I’ve heard both ‘air a’ Ghàidhealtachd’ and ‘anns a’ Ghàidhealtachd’, is there a difference? If so, how are they different?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Cliff309953

Why is 'air an' translated the same as ' ann an' ?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/FiferWD

When is "air an" used in place of "ann an" and why? Is this an arbitrary thing like "is" and "agus"? A lot of confusion with alternative words. Sometimes I go to the Learn Gaelic dictionary and find a list of words and examples that all mean the same thing in English. Sometimes the word used by Duo is not in the dictionary at all. Very frustrating.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PhilipWhitaker

My understanding is that ann an is used when you are literally inside something, like a school, church etc. whereas air an is used when you are "in" something that you can't be physically inside, such as a country or place.

It is similar to the French phrases dans l'église, meaning in(side) the church compared to en France, meaning in France.

In summary, I think it's English that it's confusing, because in can be used both literally and figuratively, whereas other languages use separate phrases.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/FiferWD

Thank you! Math fhèin!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/FiferWD

Sorry, "air a'" not "air an".

Learn Scottish Gaelic in just 5 minutes a day. For free.