"DeNederlandsedraagtgeleklompen."

Translation:The Dutchwoman wears yellow clogs.

4 years ago

18 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/ijz3r
ijz3r
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Second reference to yellow clogs in this skill? First the Foundation for Children Without Yellow Clogs, now this!

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/sobmar
sobmar
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Why is "The Dutch wears yellow clogs" incorrect?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/El2theK
El2theK
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Because Nederlandse refers to a female, the same with Duitse, Engelse, Spaanse etc.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Zimowski
Zimowski
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And how can I say "Dutchman"? Englishman = Engelsman, is a Dutchman - Nederlandsman then?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/El2theK
El2theK
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Nederlander

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Zimowski
Zimowski
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thanks!

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Alonely
Alonely
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How could you just say, "He is Dutch"? We learned how to say "He is Spanish" or "She is American", but what about Dutch?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/El2theK
El2theK
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  • Hij is Nederlands/ (een) Nederlander
1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/grey236
grey236
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How would one say, "The Dutch wear yellow clogs" as just people in general?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/El2theK
El2theK
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De Nederlanders

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AdeKurniawan92

How about "The dutch wears yellow clogs"?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/El2theK
El2theK
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It doesn't work as a singular noun

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/sobmar
sobmar
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OK, but in English the word Dutch can mean both female and male. The same with other nations. In Polish you say "Polak" for Polish man and "Polka" for Polish woman, but in English for both you can say Pole. Also in other DL exercises, for different languages as well, it is always accepted, that in English you don't have such a strong gender distinction and one word can be used both for male and female. Good example is secretary - in Dutch you say "secretaris" for male and "secretaresse" for female secretary and in an exercise DL accepts translation "secretary" if the word in Dutch is "secretaresse", so I don't know why in this case it is different.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/PaCa826187
PaCa826187
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I'm a Native English speaker and I've rarely heard 'The Dutch' used to mean one Dutch person. It usually means the people as a whole in my experience.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/El2theK
El2theK
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With the difference being that in English there are no separate words for secretaris and secretaresse, while Dutchman (http://www.oxforddictionaries.com/definition/english/Dutchman) and Dutchwoman (http://www.oxforddictionaries.com/definition/english/Dutchwoman) do exist. Plus the Dutch normally refers to the people of the Netherlands collectively.

Perhaps a more obvious example. You also say the Spaniard to refer to a single Spanish person and not the Spanish (and yes in this case English does not have a separate word for a male or female inhabitant of Spain).

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/sobmar
sobmar
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OK, I see that for some countries you can use -woman as Frenchwoman etc. Nevertheless, in my opinion both gender specific (Dutchwoman) and general term (Dutch) should be accepted in such situations. The use of "-woman" nouns is quite rare, I think. Honestly, I've never seen it earlier, altough I have been using English for almost 20 years. :)

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Rekty
Rekty
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The fact that you are learning a language forces them to consider the general term Dutch incorrect. It may not be false in general, but here, it is not just a Dutch, it is either a Dutchwoman or a Dutchman. And, in real life, if you have -se in the end, everyone would translate it/consider it as a Dutchwoman, not a generic Dutch. To say Dutch, they would use Nederlander.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/raconteur
raconteur
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i would very much like a reference to the "flying dutchman", come on. a dutchman does mean a man from holland in old english, right?

2 years ago
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