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"Wir tragen den Fernseher in den Garten."

Translation:We are carrying the television to the garden.

May 11, 2013

16 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MikeHoy

is 'the garden' not in the dative case, and therefore 'in dem Garten?'


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/olimo

A simple rule: use Dative when talking about place and Accusative when talking about direction. "Wir tragen den Fernseher in dem Garten" means "We are carrying the television in the garden", i.e. inside the garden. With "in den Garten" the direction to the garden is shown.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/philster043

Thanks for putting my raised eyebrow at rest. Makes sense.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/lannisturd

der Fernseher (TV set) vs das Fernsehen (TV)? Why is the latter marked wrong?,


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/WirreGedanken

I believe Das Fernseher = the actual physical object for showing programmes and Fernsehen is the form of entertainment - 'Television programmes


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/bacchio66

Thanks. Very useful. For the Italians out there, Fernsehen=televisione (the media), Fernseher=televisore (the appliance)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MurrayDouglas

I cannot understand many of the relevant & important aspects of this article.

If someone who speaks very little of the language they are learning is confused about some aspect of it, an explanation presented entirely in that language is not helpful.

Do you see the problem here?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/WirreGedanken

I do understand that while the intention is good, it can be frustrating. If you are still a bit confused about the difference between the two meanings (Fernseher/Fernsehen) then perhaps this might help, even though it does kind of repeat parts of what others have already contributed on this forum.

A Fernseher/TV is the physical appliance (Gerät) with which you can have:
Flat-screen TV - Flachbildfernseher
Remote control - Fernbedienung
a manufacturer - Hersteller

Ich habe mir einen neuen Fernseher gekauft. I bought a new TV.

In contrast, Fernsehen, is used to cover the broadcasting media, or the act of watching TV

Ich habe gestern einen Film im Fernsehen angeschaut.

There is a discussion about this on Youtube by Deutsch mit Marija, but it is in German. If you display the auto-generated English subtitles, you can get the basic meaning. In it Marija explains how it is a common mistake. Marija does a good job of explaining the difference, particularly from 0.20 to 3.20


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SydneyBlakem

Silly place for a TV.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RosettaY

I wrote, I think, it was very correct: "We are carrying the television set in the garden", but Duolingo did not want to accept that! )-:


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JoannaTrea

@RosettaY - There are two parts of your answer which differ from Duolingo's preferred translation.

(1) "the television set" looks fine to me. If anyone else uses this, let us know if it was accepted - and flag it up (report button) if it wasn't.

(2) "in the garden" may well be the problem. The German uses the accusative case, indicating the action of moving into the garden. Movement in, that is, within the garden, is regarded as being essentially located within one space and would require use of the dative.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RosettaY

Escuse the late answer, but the German preposition "in" can be applied with both the dative and the accusative.

Direction = in den Garten - in the garden stands with with the accusative with the question "wohin?" You do not need "into", that is only an additional stress for "in hinein"

Place = in dem Garten. Der Fernseher steht im Garten. "The TV is in the garden"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Linda995763

Would "Wir tragen den Fernseher zu den Garten" be okay" Is "in den" better than "zu den"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RosettaY

For the preposition "zu" you need the dative = zu dem Garten, not the accusative.

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