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"Fruit is zoet."

Translation:Fruit is sweet.

4 years ago

13 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/grubymis
grubymis
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zoet - sweet

het zout - salt

One vowel, so much difference :)

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Susande
Susande
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And zuid = south (a d at the end of a word is pronounced like a t).

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/UnitarioRe

It is like "Schildpad", This word almost makes me crush up my head against my keyboard, for Sch, though, Finally I got it!!!!

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/nSSn
nSSn
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I had to break it in s-child-pad for my brain to even process it. After that I haven't forget it :P

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/moidekar
moidekar
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I can't figure out how to pronounce 'fruit'. Is the audio faulty?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/WarmFoothills

It sounds fine to me. The pronunciation of ui is explained here: https://www.duolingo.com/comment/3732990.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/moidekar
moidekar
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Very helpful. Bedankt!

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/CleanComfort

Is the "f" meant to sound like a "sch" sound? Because it hasn't for any other question, but that's what this one sounded like.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AlejandroS586382
AlejandroS586382Plus
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Not sure if anyone can answer this but here goes...

From my understanding, Fruit is derivative from Latin "fructus" and as such English and French retain such. My question is there a germanic word for "fruit" in nederlands such as "Obst" in German?

Just curious :)

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/debrucenator

vruchten (plural)

I have also had trouble with this word 'fruit' (as opposed to 'vruchten') in Dutch.

Just sticking to the literal (plant) meaning of the word, I think the difference in Dutch is that 'vruchten' can refer to the flowering parts of any plant which produce fruits, vegetables, nuts, beans, etc. In English, the word 'fruit' can, in a more technical sense, be used in this way. But generally speaking, the word 'fruit' differentiates citrus or other sweet fruit, like apples, bananas, grapes, oranges, strawberries, pears, etc. from vegetables. I know the Dutch word for vegetables is groenten, and I am just now learning the Dutch word 'fruit' (pronounced like "frout" in English) has the same meaning as the English word 'fruit' (pronounced like "vroet" in Dutch), referring to sweet fruit. All this time I thought the word for that was 'vruchten.' It's confusing because the Dutch words vrucht, vruchten and fruit ("frout") are all the same in English: fruit ("vroet").

I asked one of my online Dutch tutors and she explained:

Bij vruchten praat je over de vruchten van een plant, de bloemen die daarna een vrucht vormen. Fruit is de verzamelnaam voor wat je eet. 'Om gezond te blijven is het goed om veel groente en fruit te eten.' 'Heb je fruit gekocht op de markt? Ja, ik heb appels en peren gekocht. Ik leg ze nu op de fruitschaal.

translation:

When you say 'vruchten,' you're talking about the fruits of a plant, the flowers which subsequently form a fruit.

'Fruit' is the collective name for what you eat. "To stay healthy, it's good to eat lots of fruits and vegetables."

– Did you buy some fruit at the market?

– Yes, I bought some apples and pears. I'm putting them in the fruit bowl now.


She just now went on to explain (this makes things much clearer for me):

vers fruit = fresh fruit

gedroogde vruchten = dried fruit


One day I came across the word peulvruchten, referring to the various dried beans and vegetables that can be stored for long periods of time for cooking. 'Peulvruchten' literally translates as 'legumes' in English. But 'legumes' is not such an everyday word in English as 'peulvruchten' apparently is in Dutch. In everyday English, dried beans, lentils, peas, chickpeas, etc. — any bean or vegetable that comes dried that you have to soak and boil in water to cook — we tend to refer to them collectively as 'dried beans' (even though some of them are obviously not beans at all). We don't tend to go around using the word 'legumes' in everyday speech.

Another one, just sticking to the food meaning, is 'vlees.' Maybe a hundred or so years ago, the word 'flesh,' referring to the edible muscle tissue of animals, namely beef, was more common in English, but now we tend to say 'meat.' 'Vleeswaren' is, I think, the Dutch word for 'lunch meat.'

But when I hear 'waren' in the context of food, I think of silverware. In the US, we tend to call metal utensils (knives, forks and spoons) 'silverware' even though they're usually made out of stainless steel, and rarely made out of silver. In England, the commonly used word is 'cutlery.' I think the Dutch word is 'bestek.'

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Science_Yay

Well, in German there also is the word 'Frucht' = 'fruit', though I don't know about other words for 'fruit' in Dutch

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Malaikah4

I thought she said zout

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/debrucenator

'Fruit' klinkt als "frout," maar volgens mij klinkt 'zoet' in die opname als, nou ja, 'zoet' ('zoot' of 'suit' in het Engels).

2 years ago