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  5. "Di dove sono?"

"Di dove sono?"

Translation:Where are they from?

May 12, 2013

34 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Briguy84

Why is di in front of dove?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ashlward

From where are they = where are they from


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Nonna602151

Why isn't it "da," which usuallu means "from"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/KarenHJensen

Why can't this be translated as From where are they?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/aobWX6yP

Literally, you could translate this sentence like that, but it is not correct English. If you want to convey the meaning of the Italian sentence, the translation is "Where are they from?"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Bennycatcat

Ah , but it is correct English. In good, pedantic English, a sentence should not end with a preposition.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/laurelteaches

Why can't this be Where am I from?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/xyphax

duo accepts 'from where am I'


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/gene10111

Di dove sono io, Di dove sono loro. Which of them ?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Cangurina777

"Da dove vengono"? Where are "they" from?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/EdithWillc

Maybe i am oldfashioned, but I was taught never to end a sentence with a preposition. Therefore it should be: "From where are they?" However, DL does not accept this answer.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Roan866446

The rule against ending sentences with prepositions is a good example of unwarranted prescriptivism. Those who invented it were insufficiently knowledgeable about the history of English as a Germanic language. The term preposition ("a preposed word") itself is only a general description. The rule was influenced by grammatical theory based on Latin--and English is not Latin...But careful writers, aware that the "rule" still has many supporters, try to avoid "trouble." But "from where are they?" is not natural English!...In highly colloquial French, one hears "c'est la fille qu'il sort avec..." 'She's the girl he goes out with', as opposed to "c'est la fille avec qui il sort."


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Dan878472

That is not and has never been a rule. Multiple academic sources support this contention. Here is one: https://www.merriam-webster.com/words-at-play/prepositions-ending-a-sentence-with Still, a very funny episode from the old TV series Designing Women went something like this: at a high society function the main character asked a lady, “where are y’all from”? The lady stuck her nose in the air and said, “I’m from where we don’t end a sentence with a preposition”. The questioner rephrased with, “Oh, where are y’all from b****?”


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/maria2s

I agree with you Edith. Proper English is: "From where are they?"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Avellana620325

But have you ever heard anyone say this?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/liron1

why not "Dai dove sono?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Chris123456

Try looking at exactly why you want to write "Dai" I suspect that you won't find a good reason and that will be why you can''t use it. Hope this helps :)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/brienza112

Then how about "da dove sono?"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/fgrinaldi

"Da" is used with the venire word. The phrase usually explains a place where the person has just come from (i.e. I come from the bookstore).

"Di" is used with the essere word. It usually explains a nationality of someone (i.e. I am from Jamaica).


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Noa562432

But: Leonardo da Vinci - means that Leonardo is originated in Vinci. So...


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Dennis264156

I gather that venire takes "da"--so it's Leonardo comes from Vinci.

And: Di dove Leonardo? Leonardo di Vinci. Let's go visit him.

I think. We all need Italian speakers to check this stuff with.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/sharondipiazza

Thanks for the clear explanation.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/VultureX

di = of. Di dove sono? = Where am I of? da = from. Da dove vengo? = Where do I come from? I think that's just how they say it.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Stsmi

Is this true: dov'e = where is
dove = where

Thanks


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mariaelena256

yes and dove sono = where are.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JaniceQuinn0

why can't sono be either you or they?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ParkerCL

In English, ending a sentence with a prepostion is bad. It's the kind of thing up with which I will not put.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SamiaELSharkawy

so di means of and about and from.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Beata467111

There is a mistake in aplication. Appers that it should be a translation


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/WilliamM.G

Incorrect English to end a sentence like this, using "from". From where are they should have been accepted. Now it causes me to retype the whole think again. No, grazie.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/WilliamM.G

From where am I? Why is this incorrect?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ronscopa

According to duolingo: di dove sono and da dove sono mean " where are they from". Makes no sense to me.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PaulSkeoch1

I swear the voice is saying "suono", not "sono"

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