"You have a call!"

Translation:¡Tienes una llamada!

5 years ago

16 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/laurney13

I thought Ustedes is plural, so it would not be a correct choice here for "You have a call"

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MardukSky
MardukSky
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Exactly. In english it could mean both things. But in spanish "TieneN una llamada" y "tieneS una llamada" are conjugated differente. The first is for plural you and they, and the second sentence for single you. Have a nice day

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/t.winkler
t.winkler
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i think she refered to the point that a few people get one call...

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MardukSky
MardukSky
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Ok, I think I got the hint, In english you (sing) and you (pl) have no differences, in other Duolingo Forums, (french and italian) to clarify to english speakers the difference between them they use (addapted to spanish): Tú (sing) = You. Usted (formal sing) = you. Ustedes (pl, formal and informal)= you all. This sentence would be more undestandable if you translate it as: You all have a call. As I said before "Vous" and "Voi" (pl you in french and italian) accept "you all" as a correct translation, to avoid confussion. I don't know if the spanish course accepts it as correct for "ustedes". Have a nice day :D

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/tessbee
tessbee
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I think you just basically said the same thing as was in your first reply. I believe t.winkler was correct in assuming that laurney13 was pointing out the fact that in the plural "you" it would be odd that more than one person would get one call (una llamada for more than one person).

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/RamNagel

Conference call. On air news team or a call-in radio show host with guests. A family whose child has been abducted being informed by the police. The point is to translate the Spanish, learn the declensions, the vocab, the conjugations. It's not to go on about how you cannot imagine an appropriate context for the sentence.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/NancyLouiseD

Could i say, tu tienes una llamada?

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/rocko2012
rocko2012
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Yeah but you need the accent "tú".

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/danielinform

Can you explain "tu" vs "tú" ?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/rocko2012
rocko2012
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They are two different words.

tu = your

tú = you

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/lynettemcw
lynettemcwPlus
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Any one syllable word with an accent indicates that there is another word without one. Él-he, el- the; Sí-yes, si-if; qué-what, que-that. Of couse the last example brings up another group of multi-syllabic words with paralells without accents (all the interogatives with accents have associated relative pronouns without) You will notice that the accent in these does not affect pronounciation, it is simply a writing convention to identify the meaning. Tú and tu (you and your) is just one case.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MardukSky
MardukSky
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Yes, you could say It. It is also not very usual. You could say that when in a group, you're saying several things. That's when you use the pronouns, to emphasize the person referred.

Tú tienes que sacar la basura, tú lavas el baño y tú lavas los trastes. (refering to three persons in the same place).

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/lepzon

I'm pretty sure the verb shouldn't be bent to 'tienen' when we're talking about 'you' getting a call. Anyone can confirm?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/lynettemcw
lynettemcwPlus
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No, tiene is the appropriate verb with the noun llamada when it means phone call. See definition 2A

http://www.spanishdict.com/translate/Llamada

Of course using ustedes surprised me a bit, but it almost always does for something like this. But in this day of business meetings taking place among many people remotely remotely over the phone it makes more sense.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/lepzon

Yes, but the example you're pointing towards also uses the verb in its formal 'you' form though. "Tiene una llamada en la línea dos...", meaning 'tienen' is not used there either

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/lynettemcw
lynettemcwPlus
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OK. When I first read your post I thought you were questioning whether tener una llamada was a valid expression. If you are just questioning the Ustedes form, it certainly is more unusual. But, as I say, we now live in the age of conference call. Whether it is all together in a conference room talking over one of those those strange small spaceship like sound stations or a video conference, or people sitting at their own desks on their computers or smart phones on something like Go To Meeting, many times you will have many people in one office on the same call. In that situation ustedes would be correct

http://www.polycom.com/voice-conferencing-solutions/conference-phones.html

1 year ago
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