"Bacchus vinum in mensa videt."

Translation:Bacchus sees the wine on the table.

June 19, 2020

15 Comments
This discussion is locked.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Bailey39

Is it just device's audio, or is it this (male) speaker - I keep hearing Bacchus as Marcus.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JohnReagan

Same here I reported it.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/enttiuni

Bacchus vinum bibere velit.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DavidPNash

Vesperi, Bacchus vinum bibit; noctu, Bacchus cum psittaco ebrio in colloquium venit.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ThomasClarke9

Here we go again...a new war is bound to start.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/TadeRulf

Bacchus ebrius cum psittacus ebrius bellum gerunt


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/shriadevarakonda

Bacchus sees wine at the table - wrong english? It isnt my first language but seems right to me


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Bradly-B

"...on the table" would be correct english if the wine is literally on the table. At is still technically correct but is more general, as in "on, under, or around"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/G55NCMS3

I translated: at the table. This might be a shortage of my knowledge of the English language, but I am learning Latin and this is not a fault in Latin.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DavidPNash

Native English speaker here, who hears the difference between the two like this:

"Bacchus sees the wine on the table": there is some wine on the table. Bacchus, who may or may not be close to the table, sees the wine from wherever he is.

"Bacchus sees the wine at the table": Bacchus is close to the table (likely sitting next to it). He sees some wine, and it's implied that the wine is on the table or at least very close by.

The Latin sentence is closer to the first of these two. (Thanks to flexible word order, the Latin sentence could also mean Bacchus himself is on the table and also sees wine, but that's a much less likely possibility.)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/HarrietLearns

I'm assuming it's the wine that is on the table. Is there any way the sentence would be different if it was Bacchus on the table? E.g. if he was standing on it?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Moopish

You could use a relative clause to specify where Bacchus is specifically. Bacchus qui in mensa est vinum videt (Bacchus, who is on the table, sees the wine). I apologize if I made any mistakes.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Neel_4312

Is Bacchus actually the god of wine?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Bradly-B

Yes, he was a god of wine among other things such as fertility and pleasure.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RyanFrey6

Pretty sure the wine did not just stay seen with Bacchus around.

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