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"Hay un concurso mañana."

Translation:There is a contest tomorrow.

4 years ago

22 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/Talca
Talca
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el concurso - game show (TV). Y un concurso de belleza - beauty contest. These are additional common uses of the word.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/janice919512

so why didn't "there is a game show tomorrow" work?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Talca
Talca
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Not in their database which is exactly why I wanted to add my comment. Duo doesn't have a lock on the Spanish language.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ejcasey
ejcasey
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Agreed. Error reported again 1/5/18. Let's see if it takes another 3 years to fix this error...

8 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/13371453
13371453
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Is there any meaning of "concurso" that has to do with bankruptcy?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/GisleHannemyr

Yes. There is a legal term ("juicio de concurso") that explicitly refers to the legal process of handing over the assets of an insolvent debtor to its creditors.

However, "concurso" by itself means "competition or "contest". The term "bankruptcy" is usually written"la bancarrota", "la quiebra" - or (colloquially) "la ruina".

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Ollie_P
Ollie_P
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"Concurso" by itself does not seem to have anything to do with bankruptcy, but I did find the phrase "juicio de concurso" on Word Reference which is translated as "bankruptcy proceedings".

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/13371453
13371453
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So depending on the context it has to do with that? I was wondering because the German "Konkurs" has nothing to do with Duo's explanation even though the words are almost equal.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Ollie_P
Ollie_P
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I'm not sure if I quuiiite know what you're asking. It's not really that it depends on the context, it's just that the phrase that Spanish speakers use to refer to what we call "bankruptcy proceedings" happens to literally translate as "trial of tender" (tender being another translation of concurso and not in itself having anything to do with bankruptcy). I don't see anything else related to bankruptcy that seems to use the word "concurso", just that particular phrase at least from what I've seen.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/RogerJames5
RogerJames5
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In Norwegian "konkurs" means bankruptcy. Contest would be "konkurranse" - running together. Language is fun!

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Happytimes777

So "concurso" only means "pageant" when it's paired with "de belleza"?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/roselaw
roselaw
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Yes, same question -- why is it OK in "beauty pageant" but not accepted as "pageant" on its own?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/tu.8zPhLD72zzoZN
tu.8zPhLD72zzoZN
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This is because the word "pageant" on its own does not mean "contest" nor "competition", but a "beauty pageant" besides being a show and a display or exhibition of beautiful women (or men or children) is also a competition or contest. http://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/pageant

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/roselaw
roselaw
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Ah thanks, that makes sense.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Pigslew
Pigslew
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Why isn't "competition" acceptable when offered as an alternative? Reporting.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/LaszloPozs
LaszloPozs
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Or "race"?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DavidMoore622957

This is less directed at that sort of contest than at shows (game shows, beauty contests, etc.). A race is a carrera.

10 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/elizadeux
elizadeux
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Competition is now accepted. June 2018.

3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/NEGenge

I got the green screen for this one, but, I still don't feel I have it quite right?

Generally, I'm used to seeing mañana, hoy, and ayer at the beginning of sentences. Likewise, I'm used to finding adjectives immediately after the nouns they describe, ie. "botella clara" for a clear bottle. Certainly, there are exceptions like gran and buen before nouns, but, generally, they follow. We had a similar sentence earlier, "Hay un espectáculo mañana," "There is a show tomorrow." In both these cases, my brain was substituting mañana for morning, because it follows the noun. "There is a morning show."

Mañana hay un concurso. Tomorrow there is a contest.

Hay un concurso mañana. There is a morning contest.

So, if this isn't a morning contest, how would I put that together? "Hay un concurso de mañana?" That doesn't seem quite right either? Any enlightenment gratefully received!

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/alezzzix
alezzzix
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Mañana is never an adjective, only a noun and an adverb, in this case it's an adverb, you can place it at the beginning or at the end and it would make no difference. To translate morning as an adjective you have to use another adjective like matutino or mañanero, as in concurso matutino.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DavidMoore622957

I like how alezzzix answered. However, it's quite common to see phrases such as "en la mañana" to distinguish morning from tomorrow. It's not an adjective. It just says in the morning. So, morning contest could be identified with something like, "Mañana hay un concurso en la mañana" = "Tomorrow, there's a contest in the morning" or "Mañana por la mañana hay un concurso" = "Tomorrow morning there is a contest."

10 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Annievlord

concurso is translated differently in different sentences. I translated it as a game show previously and it was correct. Why not now?

1 year ago