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  5. "– Onko sinulla kuuma? – On."

" Onko sinulla kuuma? On."

Translation:– Are you hot? – Yes, I am.

June 23, 2020

37 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/LightningEagle

It doesn't accept "warm" in place of "hot", how would "Are you warm?" translate into Finnish? I suppose 'warm' might confer a state of pleasant warmth where 'hot' could indicate being too warm hence changing the intended meaning?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Zzzzz...

The warm/hot division is usually tied to the context, but in this type of sentence "warm" is actually more closely connected to "cold" than "hot". If the weather is cold, or you work in some cold place like a meat locker, or you are having shivers because you are sick, the question Onko sinulla lämmin?, "Are you warm?" is posed to inquire whether you are able to cope with the weather, the meat locker, or the illness. Maybe you need long johns because the wind is blowing straight from Siberia, or a break from work with a cup of coffee, or an extra blanket, or someone to tell you how the thermostat works. Onko sinulla kuuma? is the better option if someone needs a cold drink after carrying furniture to a flat on the 7th floor or needs to dabble with the air conditioning during a heatwave. To put it shortly, LÄMMIN is used when cold is the source of potential discomfort, KUUMA is used if heat is the most likely problem.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/demoographics

I think "I am" is an idiomatic answer to the question in English (leaving the "yes" implicit).


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Zzzzz...

"I am" is among the accepted answers on our end. If it's not accepted yet, it's because it has not been integrated into the course yet. Please remember to use the flag to report any translation that is missing. :)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/LeenaNiemela

Technically, "Yes I am" should be "Jo, on", right?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Zzzzz...

Kyllä on, joo on, and juu on are all acceptable answers. Jo means "already", so it's not accepted. :)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/LeenaNiemela

right, yes, that my misspelling :0 Jo and joo


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/CthvlhvsMagnvs

Can you say 'Oletko sinä kuuma?' in a certain other sense?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Zzzzz...

In certain areas and age groups, yes. But it sounds even cornier in Finnish than in English and getting misunderstood is more likely, since it's not used by everyone. ;)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/pieni_chilipalko

Yes, but people do use "kuuma nainen/mies" if someone is very good looking, i.e. hot.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Zzzzz...

Yes, they do. Particularly among people from the capital region who are 20-30 years old. It seems to be slowly going out of fashion though. :)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/austeraR

I'd always wondered about that. It's in the course to illustrate (idiomatic?) phrases like 'minulla on kiire', right?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Zzzzz...

It is not in the course. Pay attention to the pronoun form, since it determines whether you are talking about the effects of temperature or how attractive someone is. The adessive form (-lla/llä) + on means "to have" and when you combine this with cold, warm, or hot, you are talking about how you are reacting to temperature. The phrase used by @CthvlhvsMagnvs has a nominative object and a conjugated verb and is about being attracted to someone. :)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Gregorius877608

Yeah, that way it's understandable as "sexy" or also "trendy", but it's not that common and yes, corny.

Also note that while in English the answer stays the same, in Finnish the answer changes to mirror the verb. "Onko sinulla kuuma? On." "Oletko sinä kuuma? Olen."


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/derpberd

I definitely know this sentence at this point but I get it wrong half of the time because I can't hear the difference between kuuma and kylmä in the audio. Does anyone else struggle with this, or is it just me? 8/


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Grade_Zero

Yep I've definitely been wrong a few times for that reason. Eventually I just guess one and cross my fingers


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/simon486678

Absolutely. I have the same problem, and it's only clear in the slow version.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/zamlet

One thing I'm curious about - you'd use something like "Minulla on kuuma" to express a certain level of discomfort with the weather or the high ambient air temperature. Would you express "I am hot" in the same way to a doctor when you're telling him/her that you think you have a fever even though it's -10° out?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Zzzzz...

"to have fever" is lla on kuumetta. kuumetta is the partitive singular form of kuume, "fever". If you are not sure about the fever, you can use the verbs luulla and taitaa to shape expectations. If you suspect your discomfort is caused by a heart problem, menopause, or some other medical concern than fever, minulla on kuuma works fine. If you just don't know what's going on, minulla on kuuma is perfectly fine. :)

  • Minulla on kuumetta. I'm running a fever.
  • Minulla taitaa olla kuumetta. I think/suspect I'm running a fever.
  • Luulen, että minulla on kuumetta. I think/reckon/suspect/suppose I'm running a fever.
  • Minulla on kamalan kuuma koko ajan. I'm horribly hot all the time.

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/zamlet

Thanks for the explanation! I've often wondered this, but never while I was sitting at my computer until yesterday... :)

So, to be clear, I can say "Minulla on kuuma" in the sense of "I feel hot" (i.e. feverish) or "Feel how warm I am", and I probably won't confuse anyone, but if I were fluent, I'd probably choose another way of expressing this. Am I understanding this correctly?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Zzzzz...

I would stick to Minulla taitaa olla kuumetta if you suspect you're getting sick, or you might get misunderstood. If you want someone to touch you, Kokeile(tko minun) otsaa is spoken Finnish for "(Could you) feel my forehead" (kokeilla = lit. "to try"). There is also another fever related expression you could opt for: Onko(han) minulla lämpöä?, lit. "(I wonder) if I have some warmness". I would avoid the expression with kuuma if you have even the slightest suspicion of running a fever. :)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/zamlet

I take it there may be additional meanings there for "kuuma" that I might want to avoid implying... ? Like, maybe, I don't want to inform the doctor that I'm good-looking (The jury is out on this one) or something, when I'm trying to say I have a fever?

As an aside, it seems obvious to me that the words "kuuma" and "kuume" are closely related, with the common element of "heat". Is there any chance this is not correct?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Zzzzz...

The lla on structure does not allow for that interpretation. If you want to refer to someone's looks (and be tacky about it), you use the nominative subject. For example, sinä olet kuuma, "you're hot".

The two words are indeed related. kuume is a relatively new word too. It was coined in the 19th century. :)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MathWizard7

Why do we say "Onko sinulla kuuma?", Rather than "Oletko sinä kuuma?"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/erikamc94

I'm curious why it's on instead of olen, for I am.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/anotherkentfan

Because it's not "sinä" but "sinulla", same form as when talking about ownership, if you remember from the other lessons. So technically you're saying something along the lines "is heat at you/do you have heat" instead of "are you warm". This is a pretty barbaric way of explaining it but I hope it helps.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DerekBScott

Surely 'kuuma' also means 'warm?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Zzzzz...

Please see my answer to LightningEagle in this same discussion. :)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DerekBScott

I can’t find your answer to LivingEagle.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Zzzzz...

In that case, I'm serving you some hot copypasta:

The warm/hot division is usually tied to the context, but in this type of sentence "warm" is actually more closely connected to "cold" than "hot". If the weather is cold, or you work in some cold place like a meat locker, or you are having shivers because you are sick, the question Onko sinulla lämmin?, "Are you warm?" is posed to inquire whether you are able to cope with the weather, the meat locker, or the illness. Maybe you need long johns because the wind is blowing straight from Siberia, or a break from work with a cup of coffee, or an extra blanket, or someone to tell you how the thermostat works. Onko sinulla kuuma? is the better option if someone needs a cold drink after carrying furniture to a flat on the 7th floor or needs to dabble with the air conditioning during a heatwave. To put it shortly, LÄMMIN is used when cold is the source of potential discomfort, KUUMA is used if heat is the most likely problem.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DerekBScott

Thanks, Zzzzz - that comprehensive explanation certainly gets a lingot from me!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Tim113080

Wouldn't "I am" be "Olen" target than "On"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/demoographics

No - because you say "I am hot" with "Minulla on kuuma" (hence the question being "Onko sinulla" not "Oletko sinä"), you reply with "on" - think of it as a contraction of the full sentence you'd use.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/luizdemello

"Are you hot" sounds like a strange translation to be standard. Unless I am being flirty or facetious, I don't think I'd ever say it that way to ask if someone is feeling too hot right now.

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