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  5. "I am Elsa."

"I am Elsa."

Translation:Minä olen Elsa.

June 23, 2020

24 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MiGmailEs_falso

Finnish pronounciation's is veryyyyy similar to Spanish.

Way to go because I am Spanish :D so the pronounciation won't be a pain at all x)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/HastaLaVista83

In the Greek course they say Greek is like Spanish, in the Finnish course they say Finnish is like Spanish. Come on guys...


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Ces.10

They probably mean the pronunciation is straightforwars, as opposed to the English system, which has 0 logic.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/astgarrido

Missä on Arendelle? Onko se Suomessa?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/vaseaaa

its based on a castle in Norway :)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/OskarLearns

"Mä oon Elsa"! If I can use "I'm" when translating into English then I should be able to say "mä oon" when translating into Finnish!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rk5I3

Then I would like to have "Mie oon" too. I never use "mä" in speech or messages, not to mention formal documents. Unlike English "I'm," Finnish "mä oon" is actually regional/dialectal.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/_Fyri_

Is it common in spoken Finnish to leave pronouns out? I know it's acceptable, but I keep imagining saying "Olen Elsa" is like contracting "I'm" in English. Would I be a laughing stock if I spoke like this? XD


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/pieni_chilipalko

Well, in spoken Finnish pronouns are actually fairly common, but they do not look like "minä", "sinä" etc. but get shortened in some way, depending on the region. (Of course there are people who do use "minä", "sinä" etc. but you chance sounding pompous if you use them.) However, no one would laugh at you for using "olen", although it would usually get shortened to "oon".

The way I'd shorten the forms (capital region):

"Minä olen" -> "mä oon"

"Sinä olet" -> "sä oot"

"Hän/se on" -> "se on"

"Me olemme" -> "me ollaan"

"Te olette" -> "te ootte"

"He/ne ovat" -> "ne on"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/_Fyri_

Awesome! This is super interesting! And I notice it is probably possible to drop "mä/sä/etc" and just say "oon/oot/etc" but that's not entirely common or is it almost as common as using the spoken pronouns?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/pieni_chilipalko

Yep, you can drop them too. :) I'd say, without having done any research on the matter, that it's slightly more common in spoken language to include the pronouns than leave them out, but it depends a great deal on the sentence.

The only instance that comes to mind where you really ought to include the pronouns is if it's some sort of comparison, because the verbs by themselves might not be strong enough, in a way, to highlight the contrast...


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Valeria689430

Do you know how to add accents to my keyboard? Thanks in advance :)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Kaimikk

If you're using your phone hold the letter and slide your finger to the correct titled letter. (I think the dots are called a title)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ChristianS46072

The two dots over Ä and Ö are called umlauts and Å has a ring(overring).

The more you know


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/cleantrash

If you're on Windows you can go into language settings on your PC and add a language to your keyboard. You can search it on google if you can't figure it out.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Graeme440919

Minä olen Anna


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/_Fyri_

MINÄ OLEN OLAF!!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/imaKid2

MINÄ OLEN SAMANTHA!!!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/wduck3

Is "minä" necessary here or would "Olen Elsa." work as well?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/pieni_chilipalko

Yes, you can leave the "minä" out, just like with first person plural "me" (we) and 2nd person singular and plural (sinä, te).

(minä) olen - I am

(sinä) olet - you are

(me) olemme - we are

(te) olette - you are

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