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  5. "Etsin laturia, koska akku on…

"Etsin laturia, koska akku on loppu."

Translation:I am looking for the charger, because the battery is dead.

June 24, 2020

13 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rk5I3

In English it's not, but in Finnish it is.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AGreatUserName

Yep, but that doesn't mean that the comma should be there in the English sentence.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rk5I3

I agree. The German course doesn't have them in English, so why should the Finnish course have?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/morbrorper

This can also be "I was looking...".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mpre53

True, but you would probably also say "koska akku oli loppu".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rene_Nyyrikki

Would empty instead of dead be alright?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mpre53

It's not what most English speakers would say, but imo it's perfectly correct. It's an idiomatic expression, and there are often multiple ways to interpret them, depending on one's preference.

It's a carry over from the days before rechargeble batteries, when dry cell ones that had been drained of power were useless and thus, "dead".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rk5I3

I think Mia attempted to reply to you, but I'll just write it here: "the battery is empty" is "akku on tyhjä" in Finnish. They carry the same meaning though, in this case.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MiaT1956

In Finnish, I would say "akku on tyhjä".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SherryWade

Would it also be correct to say "I am looking for a charger? Funny, I've been searching for a charger for my new phone today!! Since it is an I-phone I have to find "the" right charger. I had to order it, once I figured out exactly which charger to get!!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/romanecml

Why is it not "laturin" if it translates by "THE charger" ? I understand that "laturia" is "A charger"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mpre53

There are a number of Finnish verbs that require their objects to be in partitive case, at least in present tense, because they're irresultive. Etsiä is one of them. Looking for something doesn't necessarily result in finding it.

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