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  5. "Excuse me, who are you?"

"Excuse me, who are you?"

Translation:Anteeksi, kuka sinä olet?

June 24, 2020

40 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/WhiskeyFlames

Can I omit 'sinä'? Would that make the sentence informal? :)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/pieni_chilipalko

Yes you can, and no it wouldn't. "Kuka olet?" is as formal as "Kuka sinä olet?". If you said "Kuka sä oot?" or "Kuka oot?" that would be informal. Other informal alternatives also exist, but the two above are the ones I'd most likely to use. :)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Zzzzz...

You can omit it, but that makes it more formal not less. The various spoken Finnish varieties do not usually drop the subject pronouns. What the pronoun looks like depends on the area you are in, but sinä is the one that is considered neutral everywhere. :)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/5nfrm

Yes, you can drop it, but it doesn't make the sentence informal. It's still formal to say 'sinä' and 'olet'. In colloquial the sentence could be 'Anteeks, kuka sä oot?'


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Patsyish

"Kuka olet?" is a bit blunt, "Kuka sinä olet?" is nicer.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MikaPerl

Yes you can, it won't make it informal though. On the contrary actually. Maybe little theatrical.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/akw_005

Yes, you can also say "kuka olet" but usually it's just "kuka sinä olet"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/violinist4qro

For the little I know, yes, the pronoun can be omitted since the form of the verb already explains itself who is doing what


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Mirza.Ahmed

I don't have a way of writing the ä in sinä using my keyboard. Will they add clickable special characters like they have in other courses?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Lassi492061

That would be a good thing. Still, you can install a Finnish keyboard. Then you will find ö in the place of [ ; ], and ä in the place of [ ' ] (in the middle row to the right of the letter L).


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/pieni_chilipalko

I think they already requested that "ä" and "ö" be added, but it just takes a bit of time for the changes to show.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/John507097

If on a phone, hold down the letter and you get options. If not...


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Tor_Heyerdal

Assuming that you're on a desktop Windows PC, you can type ‹ä› by holding down the left alt key, and then pressing 0228 on the numpad, and then releasing the left alt key. Numlock has to be turned on for this to work, and you do have to use the numpad. The numbers on the left side of the keyboard above the letters won't work for this. Likewise, you can do 0246 for ‹ö›. Another option is to just copy "äö" to your clipboard with ctrl+c, and then just paste them every time you want to use one and backspace the one you don't need.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Hacu.

For the plural 'you', this would be "keitä (te) olette?"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Zzzzz...

The plural version is accepted. :)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/klettari

"Kuka sinä olet" translated literally is "who you are", not "who are you", so I'm assuming in Finnish the order of words doesn't change for a question. Is it so?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Juha757388

I think if there's a question word at the start it doesn't. But if you ask with the verb, e.g. "oletko maksanut lipun?"="have you paid the ticket?", then it obviously does.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RickS_NL

@klettari: "Litteral" translation only makes sense between closely related languages. Finnish is not closely related to any other European languages except Hungarian and Estonian. It's an Uralic language, which has its roots in Asia. Not only has it a different word order, but also it structures relationships between words in a totally different way. It has over a dozen cases, very few propositions, and vowel harmony. Advice: Try to familiarise yourself with the Finnish way of thinking through the examples Duo presents, and do not try to create Finnish "sentences" using linguistic characteristics of English, especially if you are not a native speaker of that language. Happy learning! (Sep 2020)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Juha757388

This is a bit excessive, I think it's certainly possible to make literal translations for most words and sentences, but you're right that they don't really extend to the word order, which should really be considered separately for the different languages.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Tor_Heyerdal

In the "Tips" section, it says this:

The question word kuka, "who", is followed by words in the same order as if they were in a statement.

I am interpreting this to mean that, when a question contains a question word (who/what/where/etc), the question word goes at the start, and then the rest of the sentence is simply arranged as though it weren't a question at all. I am also interpreting this to mean that, if a question does NOT contain a question word, then the syntax (order of words) probably does change. And Juha757388's comment above would seem to support that.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/-Jellyfish-

I've only been learning Finnish for 10 minutes and I can already see why Finland is one of the happiest countries in the world.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Julie37582

How do I add the accents when typing? I'm using and English keyboard.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Juha757388

As a Finnish native, I've pretty much only used the Swedish/Finnish keyboard all my life, so I only just learned the US doesn't have the double dots even as an accent key. I would recommend installing some keyboard layout which adds it but doesn't change the basic keys you're used to, at least not too much. The Canadian French layout might be a good choice due to its similarity to US QWERTY.

Or you could just install the Finnish/Swedish layout as an option too, but that has more changes to where various symbols etc. can be found.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Tor_Heyerdal

Assuming that you're on a desktop Windows PC, you can type ‹ä› by holding down the left alt key, and then pressing 0228 on the numpad, and then releasing the left alt key. Numlock has to be turned on for this to work, and you do have to use the numpad. The numbers on the left side of the keyboard above the letters won't work for this. Likewise, you can do 0246 for ‹ö›. Another option is to just copy "äö" to your clipboard with ctrl+c, and then just paste them every time you want to use one and backspace the one you don't need. If you don't want to do that, then you'll need to either install a foreign keyboard layout to your machine or you'll need to make a custom keyboard layout. I've taken the latter route. On my keyboard, due to the custom layout I've created, I can type ‹ä› by typing altgr+a and I can type ‹ö› by typing altgr+o. "Altgr" (alt grade) is the "alt" key which is on the right side of the space bar. It's very, very handy. You can create your own custom keyboard layouts using an easy-to-use program called Microsoft Keyboard Layout Creator 1.4. It's free, too.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/LaKatoGranda

/antēksi kuka sinæ olet/?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Lassi492061

Doctor Wolmar Schildt (Kilpinen) proposed in the 19th century a "stretch script" (venykekirjoitus) that resembled the orthography of LaKatoGranda (except that long vowels were marked ê, not ē). Schildt invented lots of new words that are now in common use, for example: esine, henkilö, jalostaa, kirje, myymälä, määritellä, neliö, opiskella, sairaala, suhde, taide, tiede, uskonto, vankila, yleinen, ympyrä.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Juha757388

If this was meant to be IPA, the ē for long vowels is a new notation for me (but understandable as /e:/), but more importantly, the Finnish is not /a/ iirc, but one of the other a sounds. There likely won't be any confusion even if someone uses /a/, however.

edit: however, as /a/ is somewhat (not exactly, but somewhat) between Finnish ä /æ/ and Finnish a /ɑ/, anecdotally many speakers whose native languages only have /a/ do have trouble differentiating between those two vowels.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Tor_Heyerdal

Yes, you're right. The Finnish letter ‹a› is associated with the phoneme /ɑ/, not /a/. It's a back vowel, not a front vowel. Though, like you say, there shouldn't really be any confusion, I think, if you use /a/ instead. However, additionally, my understanding is that the Finnish letters ‹e›, ‹ö›, and ‹o› are technically associated with the phonemes /e̞/, /ø̞/, and /o̞/, respectively. They're, like, mid, not high-mid/close-mid. Though, again, using /e/, /ø/, and /o/ shouldn't really cause any confusion.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/marg272761

How do I put in accents?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Juha757388

Ä and ö are not considered accented letters or diacritics in Finnish, but full letters in their own right. Accented e's and such do show up in some surnames, but probably not in any words on the Duolingo course.

If you're on mobile, you should be able to easily install alternative keyboards which include them. Look for a Finnish or Swedish keyboard, they should be identical. On PC, you can do the same in Windows but if your physical keyboard doesn't have enough buttons using the alternative layouts might be tricky. You can learn so-called alt codes for them or set keyboard shortcuts to type the alt codes with a simpler combination like alt+a and alt+o. Or you could just copy-paste them from somewhere when they're needed, but that's a lot of work.

Also, there was already advice on how to type them above. Read the rest of the thread if my comment wasn't clear enough; maybe someone else wrote it better before.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Enthugger

Wouldent that be a weard question to ask just randomly


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Sellu_12

Olenko ainoo suomalainen tääl>;)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Lassi492061

Kai me ollaan kumminkin vähemmistö.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Juha757388

No toivottavasti. Kielen oppimiseenhan tämä on tarkoitettu.

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