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"Hij gaat niet zonder zijn muis."

Translation:He is not going without his mouse.

4 years ago

21 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/talideon
talideon
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That's loyalty.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/colfin_96
colfin_96
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Sounds like a dedicated programmer

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/talideon
talideon
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Ah, I'm fine with a trackball or trackpad, myself. :-)

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ThibautLeg

Amour, quand tu nous tiens...

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AnUnicorn
AnUnicorn
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Mouse: never leave home without it.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/EstelleTweedie
EstelleTweedie
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Could this be a computer mouse too?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Susande
Susande
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Yes.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/mahankr
mahankr
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This reminds me of "Diamonds Are Forever" when James Bond says, "I was just out walking my pet rat and seemed to have lost my way." :)

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/WakaPX
WakaPX
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Oh the Green Mile

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JohannSuarez

Mr. Jingles!

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/IntegrationAsh

Mortimer!

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MichaelOffner

I'm fairly certainly that "He goes nowhere without his mouse" should be a viable answer as well.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/shatov72
shatov72
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I typed the same answer too, but I think that it is different. The context would make all the difference here - for example, this could occur in a conversation about cheese eating contest. In that context, 'nowhere' wouldn't be right.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Luscinda
Luscinda
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That's true but then the answer provided would also be decidedly odd.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Jazzybard
Jazzybard
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But as we're being asked to translate sentences without being given any context, shouldn't the expectations be somewhat flexible? To translate anything, you have to assume a context. Not everybody's going to assume the same context.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/shatov72
shatov72
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That's a good question. What Duolingo is good at is a type of 'grammar-translation' style of language learning, where the focus is on repetition of the translation of particular grammatical features. Context doesn't enter into that method very much, as the focus is on a particular 'correct' answer. Duolingo is more flexible than most grammar-translation style tests, but it is still following roughly that style.

The focus on context and the appropriacy of your response follows a more humanist methodology, where the learner is considered as a whole person and the language is part of a communicative act, rather than a contextless translation. This style of language teaching has been very popular in Europe and the USA for the past 20+ years. And this is the style of language teaching that I work in.

But I do think that for the focus that Duolingo has - grammatical accuracy - the contextless rigidity of grammar-translation is a good thing. Duolingo is training, in a fun manner, a level of grammatical accuracy that I really struggle to achieve any other way, and which I see my students struggle to achieve.

I wouldn't say that the Duolingo style of learning on its own will result in someone being fluent in a language - but as a solid basis for my study of Spanish and Dutch, Duolingo is giving me an excellent start in those languages. The next step I have taken after several months with Duolingo is to introduce context for practicing using the language for communication. That is the point at which I would expect more flexibility in meaning & translation.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Porckchop

That isn't a correct grammatical construction in English, you cannot isolate 'go' without adding a destination such as "anywhere" or "to the library". It in fact is being used in the same context as "He does not go without his cup of tea." which refers to someone being deprived of something. What they mean to say (I think) is that "He does not go without TAKING his mouse". In any case it is nonsensical in English, you would have to write for example "He does not go to the opera without his mouse" for it to make sense. You could also write, "He doesn't LEAVE without his mouse." As a native speaker of English this is a correct translation, Duolingo's is wrong IMHO.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/StuartHeslop

I'm a native English speaker as well, and although I do think your suggestions work, "He does not go without his mouse" is not nonsensical, it still works. While it may be misinterpreted, it means the same thing, and would still be accepted if someone said it. "He is not going without his mouse" works a little better (it could work the same as previous, but is less likely to be considered habitually taking a mouse, and more likely just this once."

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Porckchop

We'll have to agree to disagree on that one, it may not be incorrect per se but it is a sentence that would rarely ever occur in day-to-day English, it smacks of someone taking what would be a perfectly acceptable sentence in say, Dutch and then transposing it into English :)

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/favoprocione
favoprocione
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I would argue that it's sensical, partly because English is crazy and fluid and partly because with the appropriate context, most things are sensical eg. "We're going to the theatre and pets aren't allowed." "NOOOOOOOOO I won't go without my mouse you fiend." (fill in your own context for why this person is so loyal to their mouse)

(it's like 2 in the morning i'm sorry)

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Judi.MD

The destination can be omitted if the meaning is clear (caveat below). This is called an abbreviated form and is oft used in text or conversation: Wilma: "Are you going to the library?" Fred: "I do not go without my mouse."

But I agree that it would be better for learning programs to stick with non-abbreviated forms to reduce confusion, or at least notice the user when they are being used. (Footnote?) Learning a new language is challenging enough! We do not know whether Dutch abbreviated forms are formal, or colloquial.

As you have noted, the meaning is unclear (to at least one user) - and therefore a destination should be included (for the sake of learning a new language). It is natural to bring along our trusted (English) toolset of rules and regulations.

2 years ago