"Tu n'as mis ni la nappe ni les assiettes."

Translation:You didn't set either the tablecloth or the plates.

June 24, 2020

25 Comments
This discussion is locked.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/enathanael

I think this one should also accomodate the 'neither-nor' answer as it is more natural in English.

"You set neither the tableclothes nor the plates"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RuthLOlsen

It's terrible English! We don't 'set' the tablecloth nor plates. We use them to set the table before a meal. Duo, where do you find your English?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/GraemeSarg

How can you not see that you are contradicting yourself?!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/CSA_GW
  • 1798

I was shown a correct answer "You DID set NEITHER the tablecloth OR the plates."

This ENGLISH is not correct at all.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JohnV770857

You set neither A nor B. Or - You didn't set A or B either. But the problem is that you "set" a table. I don't think I have ever heard of "setting" the tablecloth. You "put" the tablecloth on the table. Or, you "lay" the table. This must be a special language for waiters.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/GraemeSarg

If the table does not yet have a tablecloth on it then that becomes part of either "laying" or "setting" the table!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/TeazleF

Yes, in British English, it's common to say lay the table, put on the cloth, put out the plates. Please allow more options. Also, you haven't laid the table should surely be accepted. :-)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Michal941272

It's quite bad.. the English translation means that either one or the other action wasn't performed but we aren't sure which.

It's like: the thief entered either through the window or the backdoor.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/GraemeSarg

It does not mean that, unless you omit the "either".

In your thief example it does not make any difference whether you omit "either" or not, since Physics prevents him from simultaneously entering through both apertures.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mlertym

Worst English translation ever!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RussellHod2

Set the tablecloth???


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Sara24179

You haven't put out either the tablecloth or the plates was rejected despite 'put out' being in the hints


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jmottern

"You didn't put out either..." shouldn't have anything wrong with it.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SusanWashi1

You set neither the tablecloths nor the plates. The way duo has written this sentence does not make sense.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Sunny928610

Non-English translators should not be creating these lessons. Really quite shocking. Unfortunately, no one in charge reads these discussion boards.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Gabb318_PHL

It's cause English is a very weird language. English not accepting double negatives is just stupid.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/GraemeSarg

You can have as many negatives as you like in English, but my wife dislikes it when I go above three or four.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/dosrac

Would someone @duolingo please fix all these *neither...nor" translations? They're awful.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/BoSwicegood

These items could also be placed on the table.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/rose830046

I think 'laid' should be accepted as equivalent to 'set'


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/GraemeSarg

You are right.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DaisyTyler

It says "didn't" is a typo for did not. Why is that?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Goldie003

There was no option to choose "did not," only "didn't."


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Tom692084

You have set neither tablecloth nor plates" is correct English grammar


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/GraemeSarg

"You have set neither the tablecloth nor the plates." is the correct English grammar to match the French. We are discussing a specific tablecloth and specific plates.

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